Best Yellow Golf Balls 2022

With color now much more in vogue on the golf ball front, we pick out the best yellow golf balls across the performance spectrum

Best yellow Golf Balls
(Image credit: Golf Monthly)

Best Yellow Golf Balls

Just a decade or so ago, the yellow golf ball would have been regarded as inappropriate by some of the golfing community; a lesser alternative that somehow conveyed the wrong message about you as a golfer. The question many golfers have faced over time is should you play a yellow golf ball? (opens in new tab) The answer is, well yes, that's if you want to! The good news is that those days are long since gone! ‘Real’ golfers now play yellow, aided in no small measure by some of the best golf balls (opens in new tab) on the market introducing yellow options, including the all-conquering Titleist Pro V1 (opens in new tab). A number of players on the game’s top tours have even ventured away from time-honored classic white golf ball to bring a little color to the professional fairways.

There’s a whole palette of different yellows on the market that would do Dulux proud. From matte and high-gloss finishes to vibrant, pearlescent and soft shades – though Dulux would no doubt come up with fancier names for them! The color of your golf ball is, of course, a personal preference, but on a practical level, there’s no doubt that yellow balls can be easier to spot when there’s a dusting of frost on the ground.

Conversely, they might be a little harder to spot in strong sunlight during autumn when the semi-rough is adorned with millions of golden leaves, but then, what ball is easy to spot in those conditions? In this guide, we'll be rounding up some of the best yellow balls on the market taking in a variety of different price points and target audiences. But why not also take a look at some of our other golf ball guides, on the best value golf balls (opens in new tab), best golf balls for high handicappers (opens in new tab) and the best goofballs with unique markings. 

Best Yellow Golf Balls

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Titleist 2021 Pro V1 Golf Balls

(Image credit: Titleist)
Most-played golf ball on the world's tours

Specifications

Construction: Three-piece
Colors: 2 (white, yellow)

Reasons to buy

+
Has enjoyed top-level tour validation for 20+ years
+
Provides superb all-round performance with impressive distance
+
Excellent control into the greens

Reasons to avoid

-
Consistently high demand means bargain prices can be hard to find

One of the best golf balls money can buy, the Titleist Pro V1 is available in a yellow finish which makes it our top pick in this guide. With its biennial upgrade, the ball got a reformulated 2.0 ZG Process Core which was implemented with more distance in mind. Additionally, the cover was noticeable when we first got our hands on some. The number of dimples increased from 352 to 388 and it is also made from a new softer urethane elastomer for spin and control. 

The result of these design changes? Well, the ball got five stars from us and it comes as no surprise that many Tour professionals have put the ball into play. It launches lower and spins less than the Pro V1x and overall it provides superb all-round performance. A couple of other key difference between this and the Pro V1x is the Pro V1 feels fractionally softer and offers a lower peak height. You can also get the Pro V1x (opens in new tab) and other premium Titleist golf balls like the AVX (opens in new tab) and Tour Speed (opens in new tab) in yellow as well. 

callaway chrome soft yellow golf balls

(Image credit: Callaway)
Premium performance at a sub-premium price

Specifications

Construction: Four-piece
Colours: 2 (white, yellow) inc Triple Track versions

Reasons to buy

+
Solid, all-round performance
+
Soft feel around the green
+
Low spin off the tee

Reasons to avoid

-
Drop-off in short game spin versus the X version

The 2022 version of the Chrome Soft is also available in yellow, as well as a Triple Track design. As you would expect the yellow version produces the same performance as the white model, which is very solid indeed. With the driver, we felt it produced a high launch and relatively low spin combination which gave our tester good distance. We also enjoyed the softer feel of the standard Chrome Soft over the X and LS versions which are a touch firmer. 

In conclusion, the Callaway Chrome Soft for 2022 is a good all-around golf ball and one of the best in the entire Callaway range (opens in new tab). The stand-out performance elements in our testing were the soft feel in the short game and the low spin but high launch flight off the tee. We should also acknowledge that you can get the X (opens in new tab) and LS (opens in new tab) versions of the Chrome Soft in yellow now as well.

TaylorMade 2021 TP5x golf ball

(Image credit: TaylorMade)
The perfect hi-visibility choice

Specifications

Construction: Five-piece
Colors: 2 (white, yellow) + Pix option in white only

Reasons to buy

+
Firmer feel
+
Good stability in the wind
+
Premium urethane cover

Reasons to avoid

-
Only faster swing speeds will get the most out of the TP5x model

One more premium, Tour-level ball we wanted to include here is the TP5x from TaylorMade. A five-piece model in the bags of many top professionals, it got five stars from us in our review (opens in new tab)

The TP5x is firmer than the TP5 model and is faster, longer and higher-launching in the right hands – namely those of faster swingers. But its new, slightly softer urethane cover provides better wedge-groove grip too for added greenside spin with a lower launch. The ball performed really well in all conditions on test and this hi-visibility yellow version is one of the most vibrantly colored around.

Srixon ad333 yellow golf ball packaging

(Image credit: Srixon)
Great all-round performer for the price

Specifications

Construction: Two-piece
Colors: 2 (white, yellow)

Reasons to buy

+
Provides excellent distance off the tee and on iron shots
+
A decent-value, good all-round option

Reasons to avoid

-
Paint on the logo seems to comes off quite easily

The latest incarnation of this ever-popular Srixon ball has undergone a number of design tweaks, including a lower compression and the introduction of the FastLayer core from Srixon’s Z-Star tour-preferred range (opens in new tab).

Straight out of the box it has a classy look to it, particularly in this Tour Yellow version which has a pearlescent, almost shimmery finish. It delivers good distance, particularly on mid-to-long approach shots, coupled with a strong and consistent flight. Around the greens, that lower compression does bring a noticeably quieter sound and softer feel than previous Srixon golf balls (opens in new tab)

Previous AD333 models have perhaps scuffed up a little more easily than some in this sector, and while durability does seem better in that regard, we did notice some wear to the paint finish on the logo after a couple of rounds.

Wilson Staff Duo Optix ball

(Image credit: Golf Monthly)

Wilson Staff Duo Optix ball

For those who like a matte finish

Specifications

Construction: Two-piece
Color: 4 (matte yellow, red, green. orange)

Reasons to buy

+
Low compression makes it ideal for more moderate swing speeds
+
Decent feel around the greens for an inexpensive ball

Reasons to avoid

-
Matte finish and color in the yellow model make it hard to see the dimples in certain lights

Thanks to a smaller polybutadiene core, the latest Wilson Staff DUO Optix promises more distance and accuracy than ever along with an enhanced feel around the greens. In our testing, we found it more than held its own in most departments and had a noticeably softer feel than many balls at this price for greenside recovery work.

The matte finish certainly eliminates sun glare as promised, but our yellow test model did prove a little elusive in among the autumn leaves when we strayed from the fairway, so one of the brighter options might be wiser at that time of year. The finish and color also gave it a slightly disconcerting dimpleless appearance over the ball in duller light, but these are minor issues relative to the performance on offer at this price.

volvik power soft golf ball

(Image credit: Golf Monthly)
A nice durable model

Specifications

Construction: 2-piece
Colors: 5

Reasons to buy

+
Designed for a mid-high launch with the driver
+
Some golfers may find the vibrant color options easier to follow and find

Reasons to avoid

-
Cover may feel too firm to some on and around the greens

The Volvik Power Soft is an inexpensive ball available in a wide palette of color options. Its oversized Power Core promises high ball speeds off the face for strong performance with the driver thanks to low spin and a mid-high launch.

A super soft ionomer cover adds in a suitable degree of greenside control too. We think this is such a good ball that we also included it in our guide on the best golf balls for beginners (opens in new tab) too.

Bridgestone e6 Golf Ball

(Image credit: Bridgestone)
Great performance for the price

Specifications

Construction: Two-piece
Color: 2 (white, yellow)

Reasons to buy

+
Perfect blend of distance and feel for moderate to slow swingers
+
This latest model is now easier to compress at moderate swing speeds

Reasons to avoid

-
It’s not the softest-feeling ball for more delicate greenside work

The Bridgestone e6 is engineered to provide the best of both worlds to those with moderate swing speeds - the extra distance they crave but with plenty of feel. It achieves this via a reformulated two-piece construction that makes the ball easier to compress to help more modest swing speeds reap maximum benefit. In our testing, we wouldn’t rank it among the softest-feeling balls around the greens (opens in new tab), but generating distance with a soft feel isn’t the easiest of tasks and overall this ball does it pretty well given its modest price tag.

Titleist Trufeel 2022 Golf Ball

(Image credit: MHopley)

Reasons to buy

+
Soft sound and feel
+
Good control for this type of ball

Reasons to avoid

-
Less driver distance at higher swing speeds

The Titleist TruFeel 2022 is the softest ball in the Titleist range and the latest version has a larger core to maximise the speed at launch using a new material called TruTouch core.

The cover is now thinner for better feel and more spin control and the TruFeel will suit mid to low swing speed players who want less spin or a softer feel. The new, improved TruFeel represents a very good Titleist all-rounder at an affordable price, and also one of the best golf balls for beginners (opens in new tab) too.

Read our full Titleist TruFeel 2022 golf ball review

Read our Titleist TruFeel v Srixon Soft Feel comparison review

Wilson Staff Duo Optix ball

(Image credit: Golf Monthly)

Wilson Staff Duo Optix ball

For those who like a matte finish

Specifications

Construction: Two-piece
Colous: 4 (matte yellow, red, green. orange)

Reasons to buy

+
Low compression makes it ideal for more moderate swing speeds
+
Decent feel around the greens for an inexpensive ball

Reasons to avoid

-
Matte finish and color in the yellow model make it hard to see the dimples in certain lights

Thanks to a smaller polybutadiene core, the latest Wilson Staff DUO Optix promises more distance and accuracy than ever along with an enhanced feel around the greens. In our testing, we found it more than held its own in most departments and had a noticeably softer feel than many balls at this price for greenside recovery work.

The matte finish certainly eliminates sun glare as promised, but our yellow test model did prove a little elusive in among the autumn leaves when we strayed from the fairway, so one of the brighter options might be wiser at that time of year. The finish and color also gave it a slightly disconcerting dimpleless appearance over the ball in duller light, but these are minor issues relative to the performance on offer at this price.

volvik vivid ball

(Image credit: Golf Monthly)
Yellow plus a whole host of other vivid colors!

Specifications

Construction: Three-piece
Colors: 8 (matte white, yellow, orange, green, purple, red, blue, pink)

Reasons to buy

+
Designed for a high-launch, low-spin driver flight
+
Some of the vibrant color options could improve visibility

Reasons to avoid

-
Some golfers may still not be convinced by matte-finish golf balls

Volvik’s Nano Bi high-energy, resilient core paves the way to the low-spin, high-launch recipe that leads to more distance off the tee at low to mid-swing speeds (opens in new tab). Available in a whole rainbow of vibrant colors developed to improve visibility in flight and on the ground, so you will hopefully follow your ball better and find it more easily.

The matte finish may still not yet appeal to all golfers, but we're growing to like it. The yellow version certainly stands out, and we suspect some of the other colors may stand out even more.

Best yellow golf balls - Inesis Tour 900 yellow

(Image credit: Decathlon)
Best-value urethane-covered model

Specifications

Construction: Three-piece
Colors: 2 (white, yellow)

Reasons to buy

+
Very good spin control on iron shots and around the green
+
One of the best-priced urethane-covered balls on the market

Reasons to avoid

-
Will spin too much for some players off the tee, especially into the wind

The appeal of Decathlon's Inesis Tour 900 ball is 1) a great price for a three-piece urethane-covered ball and 2) excellent spin control and performance on approach shots and chips. This ball has a lustrous finish with a handy alignment side stamp. We particularly liked the feel of the cover in the hand – slightly tacky to the touch, conjuring up visions of controllability around the greens. In testing, it felt suitably soft off the clubface too.

In essence, it offers performance up there with the best mid-price balls, and not far off some premium models, at more of a budget price – an all-around performer that doesn't scuff up too much and offers plenty of durability.

Snell Get Sum Golf Ball in front of Snell packaging and boxes

(Image credit: Future)

Snell Get Sum Golf Ball

Specifications

Construction: 2-piece
Colors : Yellow

Reasons to buy

+
A fantastic golf ball for distance
+
Excellent value
+
Very easy to flight

Reasons to avoid

-
Doesn't offer the best control around the greens 

If you're looking for a golf ball that will maximize distance and consistency off the tee then this offering from Snell is a great option. Coming in at excellent value too, the Get Sum golf ball is perfect for individuals looking for a high-performance golf ball that won't cost them a bomb. Made from a soft Surlyn material, the Get Sum golf ball is designed to help players get the ball up in the air more easily. It also spins less than many other offerings on the market, to help you strike the ball straighter and further. 

It is a no-nonsense golf ball that might not offer a lot of control around the greens, but will certainly help you improve in your long game. Check out our guide on the best distance golf balls (opens in new tab) for more options that will help you tee it high and let it fly. 

Callaway Warbird

(Image credit: Callaway)
A great value for money golf ball

Specifications

Construction: Two-piece
Colors: 2 (white, yellow)

Reasons to buy

+
Eyecatching low price for a top brand
+
Designed for longer carries

Reasons to avoid

-
Feels very firm around the green

Callaway has used the Warbird name for several decades now, and this budget model is essentially an out-and-out distance golf ball. The latest Warbird model generates its distance via the perfect combo of a large, soft, high-energy core plus a low compression. When we tested the ball, with the driver, it felt powerful and delivered a strong ball flight with plenty of roll - so it's hard to dispute that distance gains are there to be had.

Callaway’s renowned HEX Aerodynamics cover design further enhances distance by helping to reduce drag, allowing you to carry the ball further.  Of course, given the focus on distance, the feel is not comparable to the other more premium models above, but another big benefit is the durability. There were plenty of occasions where this ball could have scuffed, yet it seems able to take the odd poor strike without blemishing too severely.

How we test golf balls

Here at Golf Monthly, our highly experienced team of testers play a lot of golf in different conditions throughout the year. While our Digital Editor Neil Tappin (opens in new tab) heads up golf ball reviews on our site, most of the Golf Monthly team have been working in the golf industry for more years than they care to remember, so have a wealth of experience to offer. Through our rigorous testing procedures (opens in new tab), our collective goal is to test every golf ball model on the market as soon as it becomes available to us, putting in the hours in all weathers out on the golf course, the practice ground, the short-game area, the practice bunker and the putting green. 

We want to get an idea of how each ball performs in all areas of the game so we can tell you what its strengths and weaknesses are, allowing you to make an informed choice about your next golf ball purchase. Whenever possible, we will also seek to acquire launch monitor data for a more detailed analysis of each ball model's performance. Specifically, when it comes to yellow golf balls, we put each ball through its paces on the range and out on the course. We try and assess the difference between these golf balls compared to other colored golf balls on the market, with a view to ensuring that these balls can provide great value and have as many performance enhancing features as other balls on the market. 

What to consider when buying golf balls

Perhaps the most technical piece of equipment in golf is the golf ball. Brands are innovating all the time to see how they can make their golf balls carry further, spin more and help the modern-day golfer shoot lower cards. For that reason, there is an awful lot of technology crammed into your average ball, whether that's in terms of the ball's dimpled casing or its construction. That means there are a lot of things to consider when purchasing your next box of golf balls and that can sometimes be quite overwhelming for players who are relatively new to the game. To help you purchase the best golf ball for your game, we've set out a few points below that you should bear in mind when you head down to your local golf shop.

1. Soft or firm?

The best premium golf balls (opens in new tab) come in alternative versions that spin slightly less for players who prefer a firmer feel or more control off the tee. We recommend you try both kinds of feel from various distances to find your preferred feel.

2. Cover material

Urethane-covered balls offer the best spin control and feel but do cost more. Experiment with each to see if you notice enough of a difference to justify the extra cost, or whether the best mid-price golf balls (opens in new tab) might be an option.

3. Long game or short game? 

Which aspect of the game is most important to you? Are you looking for maximum distance or something that allows your short game to shine around the greens?

If you value the former then check out our guide to the best distance golf balls (opens in new tab); if you put a real premium on feel, perhaps our best soft feel golf balls (opens in new tab) guide might be a good next step.

4. Color/visuals

Are you very much a classic white ball player, or someone open to playing something a little different as the golf ball world evolves? There's more choice than ever in this regard and if you are reading this guide, chances are you want a slightly different color or look to your golf ball.

5. Price

No buying guide would be complete without at least mentioning price. Thankfully most brands make models at different price points and you can rest assured there is decent performance on offer across the price spectrum. It is also worth considering that personalized balls cost a little more money. 

For more advice on buying golf balls, we have a ton of information on our website that will help you make the right choice for you. If you're after colored balls in particular, take a look at our guide on the best-personalized golf balls (opens in new tab) and our guide on the best 10 golf balls with matte finishes that offer high performance (opens in new tab)

FAQs

Are yellow golf balls better?

From a golf ball performance standpoint in how it reacts to ball-striking and such, there is usually next to no difference really. A white Pro V1, and yellow Pro V1 are going to react the same way. However yellow golf balls are said to be easier to see and find on the golf course. In our testing, we found that off the tee it was noticeable that the yellow color was easier to track through the air than the white. It stayed visible for longer through the sky and this was even more the case in overcast conditions.

Are yellow golf balls allowed?

Yes yellow golf balls are allowed at every level of the game. In professional tournaments, the USGA does not restrict the color of the golf ball but a player is not allowed to switch colors during the round. If a professional golfer starts a round with a yellow golf ball, they will have to use a yellow golf ball for that entire round

Who plays yellow golf balls on Tour?

If honest there are not that many Tour professionals who put yellow balls into play. Bubba Watson was the most high-profile example but he went back to the traditional white reasonably quickly. Kyle Jones Rory Sabbatini and Davis Love III have also dabbled with yellow golf balls as well.