Best Golf Drivers For Beginners 2022

A closer look at some of the best golf drivers for beginners...

Best Golf Drivers For Beginners
(Image credit: Future)

Best Golf Drivers For Beginners

If you're new to golf...welcome, you're going to have a great time. By now you've probably realised that the golf equipment market is vast with huge array of different brands and fully dictionary worth of technical jargon to wade through. We're here to help though and this guide on the best golf drivers for beginners aims to be a helpful, jargon-less guide to point you in the right direction of which driver is best for your game. 

The golf driver is probably one of the most fun clubs in the bag to use, but it is also one of the most difficult to master consistently. If you've borrowed a friends or rented one at the driving range you'll know how much fun they are to hit when it goes right, but how frustrating it can be to strike well. 

Beginners especially will take some time to learn how to master the longest club in the bag. It's also one of the most expensive single clubs you can buy, so finding one at the right price is key too. Price doesn't mean exclusivity though, and even the more expensive drivers in this list are made with beginners in mind, not just lower handicap golfers. In short, even the most expensive drivers can suit your game and this list covers an array of drivers from across all price points. 

Most new golfers have a tendency to slice the ball - that's a shot shape that goes left-to-right if you're right handed. Beginners, too, will often struggle to to get enough launch angle to maximise distance. These models - which vary in price but are mostly towards the lower end - won't save the poorest of swings, but they are designed to help; they will certainly give you a little more margin for error - plus a confidence boost standing on the tee.

Look out for drivers with adjustable hosels too. The hosel is the part of the club that connects the shaft to the head and drivers have developed over time to allow this part of the club to be adjusted. This functionality allows you to adjust the loft of your club higher or lower. Having this means you can tinker to find just the right set up for your swing while also increasing the lifespan of your driver as you get better. That should be the only piece of jargon in this guide, but look out for it as a key feature of some of the drivers listed below. 

There are still a number of drivers that have been announced that aren't yet available at retails, so check out our list of the drivers we're most excited about for 2022 at the bottom of this guide. Once they become available, we'll add them to our main list, so keep a close eye on this guide to see when you'll be able to get your hands on some of the most exciting drivers coming this year.

So without further ado let's take a look at some of the best golf drivers for beginners. We also recommend taking a look at our guides on the most forgiving drivers, best high handicap drivers, and the best golf drivers for distance.

Best Golf Drivers For Beginners

TaylorMade Stealth HD Driver resting on the ground

(Image credit: Dominic Smith)
Most Innovative Driver For Beginners

Specifications

Lofts : 9°, 10.5° & 12°
Adjustable Hosel: Yes
Stock Shaft: Fujikura Air Speeder 45
Left Handed Option: Yes, in 9° and 10.5°

Reasons to buy

+
Very strong overall performance
+
Outstanding shelf appeal
+
Consistent ball flights, especially in the wind

Reasons to avoid

-
Less confidence inspiring than outgoing SIM2

Over the last few years, golfers have become used to seeing TaylorMade introduce new driver technologies in a bid to unlock more distance off the tee. For 2022, this promise comes in the shape of an all new carbon fibre face. To highlight this new technology, the face of the Stealth driver is red. Whilst this might not be to everyone’s taste, the chosen colour is not too bright and down behind the ball is fairly recessive. We liked it. 

The version we have highlighted here is the Stleath HD, with HD standing for high draw. Beginner golfers have a tendency to slice the ball with their driver (that's a left to right shot shape if you're right handed and the other way if you're a lefty) so this driver has a built in draw-bias to help encourage a draw shape off the tee. During our testing we found that the majority of our shots finished left of target, which is ideal for a right handed golfer struggling with a slice. While it may be a little more high pitched than the outgoing SIM2 driver, it still sounds great in our opinion. During our testing, we managed to deliver an extra three miles per hour in clubhead speed with the Stealth compared to the SIM2. As you’d expect, this (along with a reduction in spin versus the original SIM) translated into more distance. 

While we'd recommend the HD version for beginners, the standard Stealth should also suit most beginner golfers. We think the Stealth HD will suit the broadest range of beginner golfers as the slice shot is most common amongst those who have just taken up the game. Whichever head you go for, we are seriously impressed with the aesthetics, performance and feel of this revolutionary new driver.

Callaway Big Bertha B21 Driver

(Image credit: Golf Monthly)
Technology-packed head

Specifications

Lofts: 9.5°, 10.5 & 12.5°
Adjustable Hosel: Yes
Stock Shaft: Callaway RCH 55 Graphite
Left Handed Option: Yes, in 9° or 10.5°

Reasons to buy

+
Stable feel
+
Blue carbon crown and red lines add modern touch

Reasons to avoid

-
Appeal limited to golfers with a slice

Callaway claims its use of Artificial Intelligence (AI), a new face material, and Jailbreak has unlocked extra performance for the high handicappers who struggle with a slice.

The larger A.I. Designed Flash Face SS21 has been made of a super strong, heat treated TA-15 titanium, which allows for the complex face architecture required to promote optimal speed, forgiveness, and spin characteristics.

Clearly this driver is designed for golfers who tend to utilise a large portion of the face over the course of a round. It feels light, partly down to the 55g shaft, but when you find the middle of the clubface it also feels incredibly explosive and stable, even on mishits.

Cobra LTDx MAX Driver Review

(Image credit: Future)
Refined Aesthetics

Specifications

Lofts: 9°, 10.5° & 12°
Adjustable Hosel: Yes
Stock Shaft: Project X HZRDUS RDX Blue 60, HZRDUS Smoke iM1060 & UST Helium Nanocore.
Left Handed Options: Yes, in all available lofts

Reasons to buy

+
More refined aesthetics versus the last generation
+
Improved sound
+
Impressive forgiveness and consistency

Reasons to avoid

-
Marginal gains versus last year's Radspeed range

Launched right at the start of 2022 to replace the Radspeed range of the clubs, the new Cobra range of drivers features three heads: the LTDx Max we've featured here for beginners as well as the standard LTDx and LTDx LS, both draw bias and lower spinning models respectively. 

We've highlighted the Max here as it will suit beginner golfers the most. The Max head features a 3g weight positioned toward the heel of the head to help encourage a draw shape. The LTDx Max sits less closed behind the ball than some other draw-biased drivers you’ll find this year. For us, that meant we were able to swing confidently at the ball without worrying about hitting a hook and ultimately, we were pleased by how consistent the Cobra LTDx Max was. If you're a beginner golfer who doesn't slice the ball too much, we think you'll find the standard LTDx head as useful so it's worth trying both. 

The aesthetics have become more refined - this year’s LTDx features a very similar-looking matt black carbon crown to last year’s Radspeed (why change it - for us it was one of the best looking drivers of 2021).

The LTDx has a much lower pitched, quieter impact sound than the Radspeed. For us, it was significantly better - creating a satisfying ‘crack’ through impact that felt very powerful. As tends to be the case with Cobra drivers, the RRP is a decent chunk lower than the competitors from TaylorMade and Callaway, all with very little difference in performance between the three brands. Stay tuned to this guide to see which of the three LTDx heads we select in our best of list. 

Ping G425 Max DriverEditors Choice 2022


(Image credit: Golf Monthly)
Most Forgiving Beginner Driver

Specifications

Lofts: 9°, 10.5° & 12°
Adjustable Hosel: Yes
Stock Shaft: 6 options
Left Handed Option: Yes, in all available lofts

Reasons to buy

+
Increased forgiveness and accuracy over G410
+
Better fitting options across three models
+
Great choice of shafts

Reasons to avoid

-
No obvious gains in distance over G410 on centred hits

To achieve the new performance levels in the G425 Max, Ping has implemented a new 26-gram tungsten movable weight called a CG Shifter, which is made possible by weight savings from advancements in the driver’s dragonfly crown design.

The weight can be secured in one of three settings – neutral, draw or fade – to influence forgiveness and shot shape. The average MOI increase is 14 per cent across the three weight positions compared to the G410 Plus.

There are two other heads available in the range alongside the Max. The LST head will no doubt the slightly better drivers of the ball looking for a low spin option whist the SFT head will undoubtedly suit a beginner golfer who tends to slice the ball off the tee. So while we'd recommend either the Max or SFT head for beginners, Ping has created a range of drivers that can fit for every player type to maintain distance while finding more fairways. Ask yourself what is more important to you - distance or accuracy - and the G425 will likely become an enticing prospect.

Inesis 500 Driver

Inesis 500 Driver

Custom Fit Yourself

Specifications

Lofts: 12°
Adjustable Hosel: No
Stock Shaft: Two different lengths (1 and 2) as well as three different speeds (Slow, Medium and Fast)
Left Handed Options: Yes, available in all three speeds

Reasons to buy

+
Solid feel at impact
+
Great value
+
Simple fitting process 

Reasons to avoid

-
Sounds very loud

Here’s a driver that has been created in two lengths, which, the manufacturer says, meet the needs of 90 per cent of people's morphologies. Its golf team creates clubs to reflect how golfer's move, and not the other way round and they are largely made specifically for golfers new to the game. 

It means there are two shaft lengths: size 1 if your hand/ground distance is less than 78.5 cm, and size 2 if your hand/ground distance is more than 78.5 cm. There are also three shaft options for three speeds, too: low, medium and high speed. Inesis recommends your shaft speed by working out what club you would hit into a green that is 135 meters (150 yards) away. Low speed is recommended if you would normally hit a 5-iron or hybrid club from that distance, medium speed if you hit a 6 or 7-iron from that distance and then fast speed if you'd use a 8-iron or less from that distance.

Whilst this is not an exact science, it is a great way for a beginner golfer to make sure the shaft is the right flex for their swing speed. It will also the driver is easier to hit and more consistent when you're using the right sort of shaft. At this price, there's no other driver with so many options in length and shaft. Further research is said to demonstrate that 12° of loft enables intermediate golfers to achieve the longest distances with a driver. If you’re new to the game and would rather not spend big on one club, the Inesis 500 is well worth considering.

Wilson Staff D9 Driver

(Image credit: Golf Monthly)
Best For Simplicity

Specifications

Lofts: 9°, 10.5° & 13°
Adjustable Hosel: No
Stock Shaft: Mitsubishi Tensei CK Blue A (50g), R (50g), S (60g)
Left Handed Option: Yes, 10.5° only

Reasons to buy

+
Satisfying impact sound
+
Ample off-centre forgiveness

Reasons to avoid

-
 Limited shaft options

The design of the D9 driver comes from computer modelling software used to simulate hundreds of different clubhead variations to find the most effective design. It also features a three-layer composite crown which helps deal with vibration and reduce the weight of the club.

A 10-gram sole weight comes as standard or there is the option for a super-lightweight 3-gram weight, giving the player the ability to fine-tune the moment of inertia and forgiveness on offer.

Benross delta x driver


(Image credit: Benross)

Benross Delta X Driver

Great Value

Specifications

Lofts: 10.5 & 12°
Adjustable Hosel: No
Stock Shaft: Fujikura Ventus Blue

Reasons to buy

+
Grey/black matte finish reduces glare
+
Arrow on crown helps alignment

Reasons to avoid

-
Doesn’t feel as solid as some of the others on this list

The Benross Delta X driver is certainly one for beginners to consider. It's the manufacturer's most forgiving driver, courtesy of a new CT-Face design which means golfers should find the ball still travels a good distance, even when a tee shot isn't middled.

In addition, the Delta Sole Structure stiffens the body of the driver through optimised rib design, increased stability and efficient energy transfer at impact. This stability is something beginners will really benefit from, helping them to gain in confidence as they play more.

Tour Edge Hot Launch E521 Driver

(Image credit: Golf Monthly)
Best For Accuracy

Specifications

Lofts: 10.5°, 12° & 15°
Adjustable Hosel: No
Stock Shaft: Fubuki HD Graphite
Left Handed Option: Yes, only in 10.5°

Reasons to buy

+
Draw-biased flight corrects a slice
+
Noticeably high-launching

Reasons to avoid

-
Unusual shape at address

The “E” in its name stands for extreme, which refers to extreme game improvement, aiming to be one of the best drivers for high handicappers. Therefore, it has an inviting yet plain-Jane look at address that many golfers may covet: a shallow-faced clubhead with classic shaping.

The “Houdini” sole places weight low and deep in the head, so that launching the ball high and with forgiveness becomes the norm. That’s why the company bills this as the “easiest driver you will ever hit” on its website.

This driver will be ideal for beginner who simply want to find the fairways on a consistent basis. The reason why we think this driver will be super accurate for beginner is its shaft is only 44.5 inches long - that’s about an inch shy of many driver shafts in popular models these days. A shorter shaft is more controllable, which translates into straighter tee shots because you will hit the centre of the clubface more often at impact.

MacGregor V Foil Driver and headcover

(Image credit: Future)
Best Value For Beginners

Specifications

Lofts: 10.5 and 12°
Adjustable Hosel: No
Stock Shaft: MacGregor Lightweight Graphite
Left Handed Option: No

Reasons to buy

+
Stretched-out look inspires confidence
+
Cutting edge looks from every angle

Reasons to avoid

-
Other drivers feel more solid
-

Sporting a stylish matte black 460cc full titanium head with elegant lines, the V Foil Speed sits perfectly behind the ball, inspiring confidence at address. The ultra-thin face delivers significant ball speed and distance gains while the expanded sweet spot, bespoke premium lightweight graphite shaft and high MOI design add in the perfect combination of distance, control and forgiveness off the tee.

Finished off with a soft compound MacGregor grip that has been designed to provide the perfect combination of comfort and secure connection to the club, the V Foil Speed driver is packed with performance features perfectly suited to the high handicap golfer.

Yonex Ezone Driver

(Image credit: Future)
Best Stock Shaft Option

Specifications

Lofts: 10.5 and 12°
Adjustable Hosel: Yes
Stock Shaft: Yonex M55 Lite Graphite Shaft
Left Handed Option: No

Reasons to buy

+
Very stable off centre
+
Adjustable hosel allows loft and face angle to be optimised

Reasons to avoid

-
Blue crown design won’t appeal to all

The Yonex Ezone Elite 3.0 driver uses In-Core Groove technology, which is designed to improve the flex of the face, crown and sole of the golf club, creating faster ball speeds across the face with lower spin rates. Updated Octoforce technology in the driver removes weight from the crown and upper face of the driver, lowering the centre of gravity to promote a high, forgiving launch and maximum carry for high handicap golfers.

The metallic blue isn't going to appeal so much to those who like a classic, black crown, yet it does have a way of helping you to focus on the ball at address, as do the two alignment arrows. In fact, the blue 'glow' actually starts a few centimetres back on the crown as you look down, which - and whether this was the idea we're not sure - actually frames the ball nicely.

Callaway Rogue ST Max D driver pictured outdoors

(Image credit: Future)
Technology-packed design

Specifications

Lofts : 9°, 10.5° & 12°
Adjustable Hosel: Yes
Stock Shaft: 3 options (Mitsubishi Chemical Tensei AV Blue, Project X Cypher Black 50 & Fujikura Ventus Blue)
Left Handed Option: Yes, in all available lofts

Reasons to buy

+
Confidence inspiring look at address
+
Powerful sound and feel
+
Comfortably aids a draw shape

Reasons to avoid

-
Sits slightly closed at address, which won't suit all golfers

The Rogue ST range is sold alongside the Epic Speed range and comes in four different heads: Rogue ST MaxRogue ST Max D (draw bias), Rogue ST LS (low spin) and Rogue ST Triple Diamond LS. 

We're highlighting the Rogue ST Max D head here as this is the option we think will suit beginner golfers the most thanks to its in-built draw bias weighting. For 2022, Callaway’s new driver range has extended its use of A.I. to optimise its Flash Face for launch and spin as well as ball speed. So while this is still a forgiving driver, it goes a long way too.

Down at address, the Rogue ST Max D has a new matte crown which we really liked, although we didn’t care much for the clock-style graphics at the rear. The face looks flatter and is lighter in color, making it more visible and therefore easier to align. The Rogue ST Max D has the longest profile from front to back to inspire maximum confidence and the draw bias will help beginners who tend the slice the ball avoid the right side of the course. If you're a beginner who doesn't slice the ball, we'd recommend the Rogue ST Max from this range to get you started.

Cleveland Launcher XL Driver outdoors

(Image credit: Future)
Suits A Broad Range Of Golfers

Specifications

Lofts: 9°, 10.5° & 12°
Adjustable Hosel: Yes
Stock Shaft : Project X Cypher 50
Left Handed Option: Yes, in all available lofts

Reasons to buy

+
Very generous head size inspires confidence 
+
Modern, premium finish

Reasons to avoid

-
Quite high pitched through impact

Aimed at mid handicap golfers and higher, the Launcher XL will definitely suit the true beginner golfer too. The drive-benefits from a larger driver head and an incredibly confidence inspiring look at address. The length of the head from front to back has increased by 6% and the contrasting crown and face finishes mean you can see all of the loft from address. Performance wise, the Launcher XL gave solid carry distance on an easy swing. For the wide range of players this driver is aimed at, the spin rates created with this driver will help keep the ball in the air and provide good carry distance.

With a recommended retail price of $399/£379, the Cleveland Launcher XL offers a significant saving over what you’ll find from the likes of Callaway, TaylorMade and Titleist this year. But it still has plenty of competition from the likes of Cobra with its LTDx range of drivers. 

How we test for the best golf drivers

When it comes to product testing, our reviews and buyers' guides are built upon a rigorous testing procedure as well as the knowledge and experience of the test team. Headed up by technical editor Joel Tadman, and assisted by Neil Tappin, both have been testing golf clubs for years and both play to a handicap of 5. Both are also able to efficiently test the vast majority of the biggest product releases and convey the pros and cons eloquently.

Getting into specifics for drivers, we first attend product launches and speak to manufacturers to understand the technology. We then hit the golf clubs indoors, usually at Foresight Sports and test the products with premium golf balls on a launch monitor.

Outdoor testing is the next port of call and this usually takes place at West Hill Golf Club, a course in Surrey with top-notch practice facilities. Ultimately, we aim to be as insightful and honest as possible in our reviews so it is important to acknowledge that no manufacturer can buy a good review. This is because our team tells it how it is.

What to consider when buying a new golf driver

You've probably already asked yourself whether you need to buy a new driver in 2022, but there's a few key things to consider when investing in a new driver, especially as a beginner. Hopefully answering these questions will narrow your search down slightly and make comparing between various models much easier. 

When purchasing a new big stick, it is crucial to ask yourself just what you need from it. Is distance your main priority or are you looking for something to help you find more fairways? We'd always recommend a custom fitting with a PGA Pro but if you know what you're looking for you can make an informed decision. As a beginner, we'd recommend going down the forgiving route to start as drivers that are built to produce out-and-out distance can be harder to hit consistency well. Our guide on the most forgiving drivers has an extensive list of drivers made for just that.

FAQs

What is the best driver for a beginner golfer?

We are confident that all the drivers in our guide will suit a wide range of beginner golfers. The best driver for a beginner golfer will have a large head and face - making them more forgiving - whilst also inspiring confidence at address. They will also tend to be 

What degree driver should a beginner use?

The driver is one of the hardest clubs for beginners to hit so getting the right loft is essential. The rule of thumb is that more loft means more forgiveness, making the driver a bit easier to hit. With that in mind we recommend a beginner using a 10.5° or 12° driver. Many drivers have adjustable loft sleeves too which will allow you to change the loft as you see fit. 

What is the most forgiving driver to hit?

You can find a great selection of forgiving drivers in our most forgiving golf drivers guide, but there are a few key things to look out for. The most forgiving drivers 

Dan Parker
Dan Parker

Dan is a Staff Writer and has been with the Golf Monthly team since early 2021. Dan graduated with a Masters in International Journalism from the University of Sussex and primarily looks after equipment reviews and buyer's guides on the website. Dan was a custom fit specialist at American Golf for two years and has brought his expertise in golf equipment to a huge range of buyer's guides and reviews on the website. A left handed golfer, his handicap index is currently 9.8 and he plays at Fulford Heath Golf Club in the West Midlands. His golfing highlight is shooting 76 at Essendon Golf Club on his first ever round with his Golf Monthly colleagues. Dan also runs his own cricket podcast and website in his spare time. 


Dan is currently playing: 


Driver: Ping G425 Max 

Fairway: Ping G425 Max 

Hybrid: TaylorMade Rocketballz 

Irons: Ping i59 (4-PW) 

Wedges: Ping Glide Forged Pro

Putter: Wilson Staff Infinite Buckingham 

Ball: TaylorMade TP5 Pix