Best Golf Balls For Beginners 2022

Our guide to the best golf balls for beginners recognises that most will be looking for decent all-round performance that doesn't cost the earth

Best Golf Balls For Beginners
(Image credit: Golf Monthly)

Best Golf Balls For Beginners

Those starting out in the game will very often be looking for a golf ball that, yes, offers decent performance, but more importantly, comes at a price that won’t break the bank. But it's worth pointing out that beginners, like other golfers, are blessed with very different swings, swing speeds and launch characteristics that mean a ball that is perfect for one may not be the best for another. It would be wrong to assume that all beginners will be looking for extra distance – a powerful, well-built rugby player starting out in the game may need little help on that front, for example!

Some beginners may want to use the very best golf balls on the market from the outset, but they will be outnumbered by those who choose to invest a little more cautiously in their early golfing years. So, while acknowledging that not all beginners’ needs are the same, the most common ball requirements will be: something to help you optimise your hitting distances; adequate feel for those shots around the green; and a price that won’t dent your bank balance too much.

Acknowledging that, here is our guide to the best golf balls for beginners. We do also recommend checking out some of other golf ball guides too, such as the best distance golf balls, best golf balls for slow swing speeds or the best value golf balls.

Best Golf Balls for Beginners

This Wilson Velocity Distance Ball really does gain you yardage

(Image credit: Future)

Specifications

Construction: Two-piece
Construction: 1 (white)

Reasons to buy

+
Excellent value for those starting out
+
Dimple pattern enhances power
+
Great distance all-round
+
Very durable

Reasons to avoid

-
Cover may feel too hard on putts

This low-compression Wilson ball promises extreme distance through a hard ionomer cover material that optimizes trajectory for maximum yardage and roll. And from our testing, we can vouch that this ball certainly delivers. The enhanced aerodynamic dimple pattern really does add to the power potential from the tee. These balls are very durable and won't mark up easily, even when it bounced off the cart path. Although the Wilson Velocity Distance is a low-compression ball overall, its mid-compression core introduces an element of greenside playability too.

The Velocity Distance is also up there as one of the best value golf balls (opens in new tab)on the market, thanks to the three extra golf balls you'll find in the box. While most other brands provide only 12, we were surprised to find 15 in the Wilson Velocity Distance package. Overall, it is the perfect golf ball that can help recreational golfers reach higher distances off the tee.

Titleist TruFeel golf ball, titleist trufeel packaging and golf ball, titleist golf ball on grass

(Image credit: Golf Monthly)

Specifications

Construction: Two-piece
Colors: 3 (white, yellow, red)

Reasons to buy

+
The least expensive option from golf’s premier ball brand
+
Soft sound and feel
+
Good control for this type of ball

Reasons to avoid

-
Less driver distance at higher swing speeds

Leading the way in this guide is the latest Titleist TruFeel incarnation which continues to be the softest golf ball in the Titleist range. Why is it a good golf ball for beginners?

Well the ball design got updated at the beginning of 2022, with a new TruFlex cover, and a larger TruTouch core, both of which combine to make a ball that has been designed to offer distance as well as soft feel. Importantly it has a lower spinning nature which might help beginners gain some distance and straighten out some of their shots as well. Additionally, if you prefer a softer sound and feel then the Titleist TruFeel 2022 is the one to go for as it certainly won’t hurt your ears on and around the greens. 

It is available in white, optic yellow and also a matte red design in October 2022. If you want to check out the rest of the Titleist ball range, have a read of our best Titleist golf balls (opens in new tab) guide.

Callaway Warbird golf ball

(Image credit: Golf Monthly)

Specifications

Construction: Two-piece
Colors: 2 (white, yellow)

Reasons to buy

+
Impressive distance combined with a degree of greenside feel. 
+
HEX aerodynamics in the cover reduce drag for added hang time and distance
+
Excellent value for money.

Reasons to avoid

-
For some, it won't offer quite enough spin around the greens.

Callaway has used the Warbird name for several decades now, and it has become synonymous with distance and speed in its ball range. The latest model uses a two-piece construction with an extra-large, high-energy core to promote distance with a high launch at different swing speeds.

All of that sounds ideal for a beginner golfer who struggles to get the ball in the air and also wants more distance, but what was the performance actually like? Well in our testing we found there were extra yards to be had, especially on iron shots into the greens, but its firmish ionomer cover provides less check and control than some might want greenside.

However we feel this tradeoff is worth it because of the distance on offer. 

Srixon ad333 golf balls, srixon ad333 ball packaging

(Image credit: Golf Monthly)

Specifications

Construction: Two-piece
Colors: 2 (white, yellow)

Reasons to buy

+
AD333 has been offering economical all-round performance for 17 years now
+
A particularly good performer in crosswinds

Reasons to avoid

-
Cover perhaps scuffs up a little quicker than some

Srixon’s AD333 was first launched in 2003 and is now into its ninth generation. Such longevity is testament to its rightly gained popularity. Given how long it has been around, it is unquestionably one of the best Srixon golf balls (opens in new tab) and is a great option for those relatively new to the game who can’t justify premium prices but want as much all-round performance as a lower budget allows.

The latest AD333 features a new FastLayer Core that maximises speed and keeps spin low by being softer in the centre and then progressively firmer towards its edges. Closer to the green, Srixon’s Spin Skin technology and Slide Ring Material (SeRM) increase friction at impact to maximise spin.

What was the result in testing? Well distance was solid and the flight was strong and consistent which was a pleasure to see. With the wedges, the lower compression was more obvious. It feels more jumpy and springy off the face than the previous AD333, with a quieter sound contributing to a softer feel. On the greens we also liked the blue alignment stamp on the side of the ball too.

Ultimately we like this ball so much because of the value on offer. The good performance coupled with the fact it will last a long time thanks to the durability, the AD333 is perfect for those beginners who want to get as much out of their golf balls as possible, without having to spend a lot. 

Srixon UltiSoft golf ball

(Image credit: Golf Monthly)

Specifications

Construction: Two-piece
Colors: 1 (white)

Reasons to buy

+
Feels suitably soft around the greens where many less expensive balls struggle.
+
Good distance as well.
+
Performs well even for beginners blessed with faster swings

Reasons to avoid

-
High trajectory will help some golfers but won’t be right for all.

The second Srixon ball in our selection is more expensive than most here but may appeal to beginners happy to spend a little more without venturing into the realms of premium-priced balls. The Srixon UltiSoft is the brand's lowest-compression and softest golf ball ever courtesy of an innovative new core that produces softer feel while still maximising energy transfer at impact for more long-game distance.

Designed primarily with low to mid swing speed golfers in mind, the Ultisoft performs well at faster swings speeds too. We carried out testing side by side with a premium model and, to be honest, it was much harder to tell the difference than we had perhaps expected it to be. Not only was distance good but the ultra-low compression core did limit sidespin and brought our dispersion in which beginners will find very useful. Around the greens we felt it was more than soft enough to inspire confidence on a variety of shots.

Volvik Power Soft Golf Ball Review

(Image credit: MHopley)

Specifications

Construction: Two-piece
Colors: 5 (white, yellow, green, orange, red)

Reasons to buy

+
Designed for a mid-high launch with the driver
+
Vibrant colour options can improve visibility

Reasons to avoid

-
Cover may feel too firm to some on and around the greens

The Volvik Power Soft is an inexpensive ball available in a wide palette of colour options. Its oversized Power Core promises high ball speeds off the face for strong performance with the driver thanks to low spin and a mid-high launch. A super soft ionomer cover adds in a suitable degree of greenside control too.

We recently reviewed it and were pleasantly surprised with the performance on offer. It is a competitive ball for the money because it is durable, has good feel for a 2-piece ball and enough spin to enable you to control it on and around the greens. Plus of course you can get it in whole range of colours to brighten up your round as well as your scorecard.

Inesis Soft 500 Golf Balls

Inesis Soft 500 Golf Balls

Specifications

Construction: Two-piece
Colors: 6 (white, yellow, green, pink, orange, red)

Reasons to buy

+
Nice soft feel on all shots
+
Surprisingly durable for the price

Reasons to avoid

-
Limited spin control on offer

For mid to high handicappers, the Inesis Soft 500 ball delivers an extra-soft touch with good all-round performance.

Available in six colours of white, yellow, red, orange, green and pink, golfers can also add some personality to their rounds while teeing up a reliable, high-launching ball ideal for the slower swinger and new comer to the game looking for something more affordable. Indeed we think the biggest attraction is its price – less per dozen than some lake balls! This makes it a good option for those who prefer to play with new balls but don’t have a limitless budget.

honma a1 golf ball

(Image credit: Golf Monthly)

Specifications

Construction: Two-piece
Colors: 4 (white, yellow, orange, red)

Reasons to buy

+
Low-priced option from one of golf’s premium brands
+
Super soft core is designed to reduce sidespin and counter a slice

Reasons to avoid

-
May feel too soft to some off the clubface

Honma may be at the super-premium end of the club market, but the new A1 ball is anything but premium-priced and could represent an excellent option for beginners.

It’s lighter and around 20% softer than Honma’s D1 ball thanks to a newly developed super-soft core. The brand says this reduces sidespin and can help counter the dreaded slice with which many beginners (and others!) are afflicted. Our testing did seem to suggest this worked. Slicing off the tee, a common problem that can affect the best of us, went reasonably unnoticed, so the A1 ball will definitely assist golfers who are struggling to find distance. 

As you would expect with a ball revolved around distance, feel is compromised a bit but for beginners this will be a minor thing. Finally it is available in white, yellow or orange plus a multicolour pack option including pink.

Pinnacle Rush golf ball and packet pictured

(Image credit: Future)

Specifications

Construction: Two-piece
Colors: 1 (white)

Reasons to buy

+
Great distance
+
Nice feel off the face
+
15-ball packs add to the value

Reasons to avoid

-
Greenside spin is almost non-existent
-
May be better options for cheaper

The Pinnacle name has long been associated with good-value distance golf balls and the brand's latest edition, the Rush, is no exception. Its high-energy core drives the performance of this golf ball, which generates faster ball speeds with every club. When testing, we found that this ball delivered high-quality distance straight away with both our drivers and our iron shots into the greens. It ball offers a nice high flight and doesn't feel clicky or loud as you might expect an out-and-out distance ball to feel. 

An icosahedral dimple design, comprising 332 dimples in a durable ionomer cover, promises a consistent, powerful ball flight with more than a hint of feel. It is quite firm on the clubface and won't dazzle on approach shots or around the greens, but that isn't this ball's MO. You know what to expect and it produces exactly that - in spades.

How we test golf balls

Our testing procedure for golf balls, as well as all other golf gear, revolves around several key commitments;

In terms of specifics for golf balls, we use several members of the Golf Monthly team, who play at a variety of levels, to put golf balls to the test out on the golf course. The entire team are regular golfers and therefore balls are used over a number of rounds because that is how you can test for things like distance, feel, durability, spin and so on. Often we hit new models alongside previous generations, or competing models to see how the performance differs as well. 

We then seek to be as honest and insightful as possible in reviews and guides to help you be more informed.

What to consider when buying golf balls

What factors should you consider when buying golf balls as a beginner? We take a look here.

Durability - When it comes to beginner golf balls this is one of the most important factors. Occasionally cheaper models don't last as long because they cut up, or the cover isn't a high quality. Therefore they do not perform as well, for as long as other models. If you want durability to be a key factor, then check out balls that have firmer covers because they will be resistant to cuts and scrapes. Alternatively if feel is more important than durability, go for models with soft covers.

Long game or short game? – Linking with the above point, which aspect of the game is most important to you as a beginner? Do you want to get as much distance as possible out of your golf ball or would you prefer a model that allows your short game to flourish thanks to improved feel?

For the former player, firmer and harder golf balls are better for distance. Or, if you put a real premium on feel then a model like the Honma A1 is the way to go. Whatever you value, there is a model for you. (Also read our best soft feel golf balls guide for more models designed for feel.)

Color - No longer do your golf balls have to be white, instead they can be different colors like yellow, red, or even green.

Budget - In the beginner section of the golf ball market there are still different levels and different price points so be aware of how much you want or are willing to spend.

Number of balls - Of course given how cheap some of the models are above, you can occasionally find deals on models that mean you can get 24 or sometimes even 36 golf balls for a cheap price. It is always worth checking this because we could always do with more golf balls in the bag right? Beginners tend to lose golf balls more quickly so it makes sense to get as many as possible. 

FAQ's

What types of golf balls should a beginner use?

Ultimately this will vary for every different player out there but we have found the most common ball requirements for beginners are - something to help get the ball into the air and hit it further, adequate feel for those shots around the green; durable enough to deal with marks and dents during the round, and a price that won’t dent the bank balance too much.

How many golf balls does a beginner need?

This is a difficult question to answer but it will depend on a couple of factors. For a start, what level of beginner are you? Have you been playing for a bit and can occasionally strike the ball well, or are you just heading out onto the golf course for the first time? Second this answer will depend on the golf course too. Is it wide open or are there lots of bushes, ditches, and water hazards to deal with which will result in immediate lost balls? As a basic rule of thumb, it might be best for a beginner to think about if they lost 1-2 golf balls a hole, and carry a number preparing for that. Or we would recommend carrying less and having a good scout around trying to find balls on the course!

Do golf balls matter for beginners?

We think golf balls matter at every level of the game. There would be no point in a beginner using a Titleist Pro V1 or any other Tour-level golf ball because they wouldn't be able to consistently utilise what the ball has been designed for. 

Therefore it is important to go for models that have been designed for specific sections of the golf market. The beginner sector tends to be more about distance, durability and value so it makes sense for beginner players to choose a golf ball in that area. 

We hope you enjoyed this guide on the best golf balls for beginners. For more golf ball content, check out the Golf Monthly website. 

A golfer for most of his life, Sam started playing the game to prove he was the best player out of his father and two brothers.
He quickly became a golf equipment expert and has always been the one family and friends come to for buying advice, and spends a lot of his time putting golf gear, apparel and shoes to the test.  
He is a graduate of Swansea University where he studied History and American Studies, and he has been a part of the Golf Monthly team since February 2018. He also previously worked for World Soccer and Rugby World magazines.

A jack of all trades across print and digital formats, Sam now spends most of his time testing and looking after golf gear content for the website. He also oversees all Tour player content as well. 

Unfortunately, Sam is not a member of any club at the moment but regularly gets out on the golf course to keep up the facade of having a handicap of five. 


Sam is currently playing:
Driver: Titleist TS3
Fairway Wood: TaylorMade M5 (15 degrees), Nike Covert Tour 2.0 (19 degrees)
Irons (4-PW): Titleist AP2
Wedges: Titleist Vokey SM7 54˚, 58˚
Putter: Scotty Cameron Circa 62 #6