Best Cheap Putters 2022

In this guide, we delve into the market of entry-level putters and pick our favorites

Best cheap putters

Best Cheap Putters 

It’s not just the latest drivers or the best golf irons that can put a fairly sizeable dent in a golfer’s pocket nowadays. Most clubs that make it to market - whether online or in-store - have had plenty of resources dedicated to their design and manufacture, and that is reflected in their price.

Cost can be one of the big deterrents for first-time players looking to get into the game. But we think golf should be as accessible for everyone and that’s why we’ve created this guide to the best cheap putters that won't break the bank. While the models included won’t come with all the bells and whistles you might see on some of the absolute best putters (opens in new tab) on the market, what you will find on the list below is a range of clubs that will do exactly what you need them to. 

As you improve and start to play more golf, the option to upgrade will always be available. For that, we have guides to the best Scotty Cameron putters (opens in new tab) as well as the most forgiving putters (opens in new tab), or even a guide on the best putters for high handicappers (opens in new tab). If you're completely new to golf, you may also want to take a look at our guide on the best putters for beginner golfers (opens in new tab)

Best cheap putters

Why you can trust Golf Monthly Our expert reviewers spend hours testing and comparing products and services so you can choose the best for you. Find out more about how we test.

Odyssey White Hot OG Putter

(Image credit: Future)

Reasons to buy

+
Classic looking putter
+
Feels great
+
Provides stability 

Reasons to avoid

-
Can sound a bit clunky at times

Paying homage to the much-loved putter series that launched nearly 20 years ago, the Odyssey White Hot OG 5 putter is an update on a classic that certainly can help you perform on the greens. It is one of the best Odyssey putters (opens in new tab) for beginner golfers and is also one of the most stylish putters on this list. It features a stunning red shaft that contrasts against the silver steel finish on the clubhead, which has a half-moon crescent shape that makes it a very forgiving putter. 

The OG 5 putter is very stable through impact and suits golfers with a slight arc or straight stroke thanks to its face-balanced clubhead. That also makes it a very forgiving club that can control miss-hits and shots going awry, thanks to the bigger sweet spot on its face. That makes it an excellent putter for beginner golfers that can both help you look good on the course and sync more putts. 

TaylorMade hydroblast

(Image credit: Future)

Reasons to buy

+
Premium looks
+
Suits a variety of strokes
+
Great for high handicap golfers

Reasons to avoid

-
Can produce some sun glare

Off the face, TaylorMade TP Hydro Blast Bandon 3 feels solid and offers up a surprisingly firm and loud sound at impact given the deep grooves on the face insert. This remained consistent across its length, though, and the speed was enough to impart a short, controlled stroke and still get the ball to the hole. 

The Bandon 3 has more of a toe hang so is ideal for players who want to have the forgiveness of a mallet and are perhaps moving from a blade. For those who prefer a face-balanced putter, the Bandon 1 will be the perfect match and is one of the best TaylorMade putters (opens in new tab) for beginners.

Inesis High MOI Putter

(Image credit: MHopley)

Reasons to buy

+
Clear alignment system
+
Sits very well at address
+
Forgiving performance
+
Excellent grip

Reasons to avoid

-
Face grooves more style than substance

The Inesis High MOI putter is the top of the range putter from the French owned Decathlon’s range of own brand putters. At just under £150 it is £50 more than the blade versions in the range, but still great value as you get more putter in a multi-material head.

Featuring a high Moment of Inertia, it means the putter is less likely to twist if hit off centre and this makes it more forgiving. The deep head also enables weight to be positioned back in each of the corners to make this possible and the Inesis High MOI is a very stable putter.

Wilson Infinite Buckingham

(Image credit: Future)

Reasons to buy

+
Counter-balance technology provides for smoother putting strokes
+
Comes with an oversize grip
+
Great value

Reasons to avoid

-
Design and size won't suit everyone

This putter is an addition to the excellent Wilson Staff range of clubs (opens in new tab) and a very recognizable head shape that has become increasingly popular in mallet putters across the market, and one of the most forgiving putters too. As with all the Infinite range, the Buckingham features counterbalance technology which combines a heavier head and grip weights, moving the balance point closer to the hands for a smoother and more controlled putting stroke.

The Buckingham also comes with an oversize grip as standard which is great for golfers who use a claw grip, or golfers who find themselves gripping too hard on a thin grip and want a softer feel. At a very competitive retail price with a premium look and feel, the Wilson Staff Infinite Buckingham is a great option at an excellent price. 

Cleveland Huntington Beach Soft #4 Golf Putter

Cleveland Huntington Beach Soft #4 Golf Putter

Reasons to buy

+
Excellent feel
+
Produces brilliant roll
+
Deep milling produces a quiet, soft sound

Reasons to avoid

-
Might intimidate higher handicappers

We were surprised to find this range of putters available at this price point, so of course, it had to be included on our list of the best cheap putters. Cleveland’s Speed Optimized Face Technology (SOFT) is brilliant and delivers really consistent ball speeds, even when the strike isn’t optimal. Not only that, but the CNC milling produces a pure roll which helps massively when it comes to judging distance from range. 

Another thing definitely worth mentioning is the aesthetics. Made from stainless steel and featuring a classic head and hosel shape, this is one of the finest-looking putters you’re likely to come across. It’s available in a range of length and grip options and will suit golfers with a slight to moderate arc to their stroke. Golfers who have an arc in their stroke are typically better off using a blade putter, so take a look at our best blade putter guide (opens in new tab) for a few other clubs that are similar to the Cleveland Huntington. 

Rife RG3 Putter

Rife RG3 Putter

Reasons to buy

+
Offers a solid, stable feel
+
Plenty of alignment assistance
+
Offers great forgiveness

Reasons to avoid

-
Head shape will split opinion

One of a number in the range, we’ve chosen the Rife RG3 because of its slightly unique design. It’s a winged mallet but not like most on the market that seem to be a variation of the popular ‘fang’ putter made famous by Odyssey. We found it looked inviting at address, which is the least you want when on the greens. 

There is also some technology that comes into its own on this model. Rife’s milled face system features scorelines that minimise skidding and encourage the ball to roll quicker. We could feel this at work and also really liked the black finish and alignment aids supplied. It won’t dazzle like some of the best Odyssey putters for example, but at less than a hundred dollars, you could do far worse than get your hands on one of these.

Wilson Harmonized M3 Putter

Wilson Harmonized M3 Putter

Reasons to buy

+
Throwback design inspires confidence
+
Ideal for golfers with a strong arc in their stroke

Reasons to avoid

-
Forgiveness is somewhat lacking

This is almost a throwback to the Wilson putter Nick Faldo wielded to such devastating effect. In modern terms, the Wilson Harmonized M3 is simple-looking, but don’t let that fool you. The alignment aid covers the topline as well as the back of the mallet head which gives handy feedback as to how the putter is sitting on the ground - if the lines don’t blend together then something has gone awry. 

When hitting putts the feel certainly won’t blow you away but it’s solid enough for beginners, higher handicappers or those on a budget to find the cup on a few occasions and avoid the dreaded three-putt more often than not. It also comes with a one-year warranty although you’ll need to source your own headcover. If you like Wilson putters and are looking for the next step up in the game, take a look at our review on the Wilson Buckingham Putter (opens in new tab) featured above on this list.

MacGregor MacTec X #1 Putter

MacGregor MacTec X #1 Putter

Reasons to buy

+
Looks great at address
+
Provides a firm feel 
+
Gives excellent speed

Reasons to avoid

-
Color scheme quite garish

The head shape on the MacGregor MacTec X #1 is a classic mallet and looks great at address. It’s also got a nice noticeable alignment aid that stands out and is long enough to make a difference. On the face, the ARC Tech milling offers quite a nice feel and as a result of its coverage, it also delivers on the forgiveness front making it one of the best mallet putters on the market (opens in new tab)

At the top end, we enjoyed the thick 3.0 parallel grip that really helped to take the hands out of the stroke and promote more of a pendulum action with the shoulders. An added benefit to this option is the one-year warranty it comes with as standard.

Wilson Michigan Ave Infinite Putter, Best cheap putters

Wilson Staff Infinite Michigan Ave Putter

Reasons to buy

+
A very well balanced putter
+
The black finish is very sleek 
+
Alignment lines are great for aim

Reasons to avoid

-
Might be too 'bladey' for some golfers

One of the best features of the Wilson Michigan Ave Infinite putter is the balance - this alone makes it one of the best putters under $120. With a heavier grip and higher balance point, it feels like the weight is distributed evenly along the entire length of the club. For us, anyway, that is an attribute we really liked. 

Another plus point is the aesthetics. It’s a slightly bigger blade head but retains the classic appearance that is still a favourite among golfers. The dark finish also looks the part and does a great job of reducing glare and contrasting with the three white alignment lines. For those who like to see more club behind the ball, there are a range of shapes available. The face is double milled, meaning we found it easy to judge distance consistently thanks to the pureness of the roll created. That makes it one of the most forgiving putters on this list (opens in new tab)

Cleveland HB Soft #10.5 Putter, Best cheap putters

Cleveland HB Soft #10.5 Putter

Reasons to buy

+
Lots of alignment assistance
+
Very stable off centre
+
Large sweet spot

Reasons to avoid

-
Not suited to arced strokes

This range from Cleveland is brilliant, and at around $120 dollars, this deal represents truly great value. In the HB Soft #10.5, you have a square-back mallet that just looks great at address. It’s got a classic stainless steel finish and the black alignment line contrasts that really nicely. 

Onto the performance and the Speed Optimized Face Technology (SOFT) works well to deliver consistent ball speeds, even on off-centre strikes. On top of that, the CNC-milled face produces such a good roll, minimising the amount of skid and allowing for easier distance control. It also comes in a variety of lengths to suit a player’s needs. One thing to bear in mind is that it’s a face-balanced putter so is more suited to those with a straight back and through stroke.

Benross Tribe MDX3 Black Putter

Benross Tribe MDX3 Black Putter

Reasons to buy

+
Produces a smooth roll 
+
One of many head shapes available
+
Sleek design

Reasons to avoid

-
Feel is on the firm side

The face on the Benross Tribe MDX3 Black putter is milled so it produces a nice roll across quite a large hitting area. While the feel is a little firmer than a more premium product, it’s something we think golfers can quickly adjust to and find consistency with making it a great putter for beginner golfers (opens in new tab). We also think it is quite appealing to look down at and the single-track alignment aid is long and stands out well against the black finish. It also comes with a one-year guarantee as well as a nice pistol grip for those that favour that style. 

Inesis 100 Mallet Putter

Inesis 100 Mallet Putter

Reasons to buy

+
Superb entry-level model
+
Long white lines assist with alignment

Reasons to avoid

-
Tinny sound at impact

This is the most inexpensive model that’s made this list. And there’s a reason for that. When we put the Inesis 100 Mallet up against the Scotty Cameron Phantom X 12 in our cheap vs expensive putter test, the results were interesting to say the least.

While it obviously didn’t compare in terms of the looks and feel, for those on a modest budget, you can’t go too far wrong with the Inesis. At impact it feels a little tinny and the looks won’t blow your mind but for less than 15 quid, the performance is hard to fault. It’s a perfect putter for newcomers or those who can only get out on the course sparingly. 

Fazer XR2 P425 Putter

Fazer XR2 P425 Putter

Reasons to buy

+
Shape frames the ball nicely
+
Face grooves enhance feel and roll

Reasons to avoid

-
Busy color scheme

The shape of the Fazer XR2 P425 putter is what we’d call a modern classic. The ‘winged mallet’ design, made popular by Odyssey, frames the ball really nicely and allows for a putter to be packed with tech intended to make this part of the game a little easier.

It might be a new name to some, but this Fazer offering comes with a new face insert and score lines to generate a pure roll and enhance feel. While it isn’t in the same league in terms of looks and feel of the best mallet putters or the best blade putters, it does a great job at this price point. We were pleasantly surprised at the feedback we received at impact and quickly got into a pretty consistent rhythm with it. An added bonus is the one-year warranty that comes as standard in case anything should go wrong.

How we test putters

When it comes to product testing, our reviews and buyers' guides are built upon a rigorous testing procedure as well as the knowledge and experience of the test team. The putter section is headed up by Martin Hopley, one of the foremost UK equipment reviewers with over 20 years of experience. Other members of the Golf Monthly team contribute to the putter tests too and all writers are able to efficiently test the vast majority of the biggest product releases and convey the pros and cons eloquently.

Getting into specifics, we test putters outdoors on real greens with premium golf balls to get a thorough understanding of design features, feel, sound and looks. Ultimately, we aim to be as insightful and honest as possible in our reviews so it is important to acknowledge that no manufacturer can buy a good review. This is because our team tells it how it is. To learn more about our methodology, take look at our guide on how Golf Monthly tests products

What to consider when buying a putter

While golf is one of the most expensive sports to play, cheap putters are not hard to come by. There are plenty of great putters on this list for those who are just getting into the game or are looking for a slightly less expensive alternative to the flagship flatsticks that some of the big golfing brands produce. If you are looking for a cheap putter, there are a few things to consider before purchasing that club. As the putter is one of the most important clubs in your bag that can save the most shots off your round, you will need to think carefully about what you're purchasing before you go ahead and buy that club. For that reason, we have set out below a list of five considerations you need to keep in mind when purchasing your next putter. 

1. Head Design

Putters come in lots of different head designs whether that be blade, mallet, or mid-mallet and all have their positives and negatives. For beginner golfers, we recommend using a mallet putter because they tend to be much larger which helps to improve the forgiveness of the club. That is done through redistribution of the club's weight to the extremities of the clubhead, which stabilizes the club and increases its MOI. 

MOI stands for 'moment of inertia' and the higher the MOI, the less your club head will turn through impact, creating a more smooth and even stroke. For that reason, mallet putters typically offer better balance compared to blade putters and are therefore more suitable for less experienced players or those looking for more forgiveness in their club. Additionally, because of this size, mallet putters tend to offer larger sweet spots which are beneficial for players who may struggle to consistently strike the ball. 

Blade putters, meanwhile, are better for those putters who have an arc in their stroke. Players who like to feel how the ball reacts off the face may opt to use a blade putter over a mallet to give them greater responsivity. Some argue that blade putters provide slightly better control over distance, but ultimately, that varies from player to player and putter that works best for you. 

2. Feel 

This is a very important factor to consider because when putting, feel is everything. Some putters offer a firmer feel off the face whilst others are soft, some are heavier than others too so you need to find a model that fits well in your hands. The putter grip plays a huge part in the confidence you feel with a putter. Get a putter with a grip that feels right and sits comfortably in your hands while allowing you to return the putter back to the ball squarely and consistently. You may also want to think about the shaft too and how much vibration you get from the club, for example, if you prefer that to be nerfed or you prefer to feel good feedback from the ball on the clubface. 

3. Looks

You have to like what you are putting with because this will give you confidence when you're standing over the ball. Confidence is king on the putting greens, so get a club that is going to boost your confidence levels. In terms of mallets, there are loads of classic and futuristic designs above so it is purely a case of finding a model you like the look of. 

4. Alignment tools

It's also worth thinking about the alignment tools the putter can offer you. While some golfers may not prefer to have any aiming guides on the back of their putters, most players can benefit from having an aiming line on the back of their putter which can also help to improve your focus on the ball and help you strike through the shot more square. 

5. Price 

Our final tip is to think about price because while there are some premium designs out there, there are also some models which offer excellent value, as the selections above show. Sometimes less experienced players should steer clear of the more expensive offerings currently on the market which may actually not be very forgiving and may not be suitable for your swing style.

If you're a beginner golfer looking at purchasing more equipment that wont cost you an arm and a leg, take a look at our guides on the best budget golf drivers (opens in new tab), the best golf irons for beginners (opens in new tab) and the best cheap golf balls (opens in new tab)

FAQs

How much does a good putter cost?

Putters are the most important club in your bag because as many golfers will know, they can help you save shots on the greens. While we would say a good putter is priceless, you can pick up deals on putters for as little as $20 dollars but spend more than $400 on a top of the range club.

What type of putter should a beginner use?

Beginners should use a putter that offers a high degree of forgiveness and stability. For that reason mallet putters are generally the best putters for beginners as the offer higher MOI's and have larger sweet spots on their club face.

Why should I buy a new putter?

Generally, the greens are where golfers lose the most shots during their rounds. Three-putting is the bane of every golfer and it is the one area on every player's scorecard where they can save shots. For that reason it's important to have the right equipment that can help you hit sweeter, much more accurate putting strokes. That's why it may be more beneficial for a golfer to invest in a new putter over any other type of club.