Best TaylorMade Putters
(Image credit: Golf Monthly)

Best TaylorMade Putters

Given some of the world's best players, like Dustin Johnson (opens in new tab), Rory McIlroy (opens in new tab) and Collin Morikawa (opens in new tab), use TaylorMade putters, it should come as no surprise how successful the brand has been. Those players are not ones to take their equipment setups lightly so we think this shows clear as day that the brand makes some of the best putters in the business.

What might surprise you is the variety in the family, with all manner of shapes, styles and colours to suit both your eye and your putting strokes. There is most definitely something for everyone in the range. As such we have taken a look at the best TaylorMade putters currently on the market below.

Alternatively, if TaylorMade is not for you, then we have also created guides on other brands, such as the best Ping putters (opens in new tab), best Scotty Cameron putters (opens in new tab), even the best Odyssey putters (opens in new tab) currently on sale.

Best TaylorMade Putters

TaylorMade Spider GT PutterEditors Choice 2022

(Image credit: MHopley)

Reasons to buy

+
High MOI in a compact head
+
Excellent insert sound and feel
+
Stylish design 
+
Good choice of hosels

Reasons to avoid

-
Alignment line could be longer

The flagship of TaylorMade's new line of Spider putters, the Spider GT recently featured in our Editors Choice awards for 2022 (opens in new tab), as a high-performance putter that provides excellent stability and responsivity around the greens. The club has been updated from the Spider X which was made of a predominantly steel frame that had tungsten weights in its rear corners. The Spider GT now looks to further improve the distribution of weight on the club, through its two steel wings, which move the weight of the club away from its center, increasing its MOI and making it more stable through impact.

On testing, we felt the putter provides a good roll and felt solid on impact thanks also to its new Pure Roll 2 face insert. The club also interestingly places the shaft towards the central alignment line on the putter, which may or may not be to every golfer's tastes, but it did make it seem like it was easier to line up the putt with our hands. 

As for style, TaylorMade have given this club a very sleek, sci-fi finish, which adds to the quality of the club. Its top aluminum plate comes in red, silver or black, and when flipped over, you'll reveal the bright red and yellow Spider logo which completes the great finish this club has. Its sleek design and performance-enhancing qualities mean this is one of the best putters (opens in new tab) currently available on the market. 

TaylorMade Spider X Hydro Blast Putter

(Image credit: TaylorMade)

Reasons to buy

+
Premium finish
+
Clear alignment tools 
+
Great durability
+
Great balance

Reasons to avoid

-
No changed much from the 2020 Spider X

TaylorMade has refreshed its incredibly successful Spider X putter with a new colorway and a new finishing process. The Hydro Blast has a smoother and very premium-looking finish thanks to the high-pressure application of water to the aluminum body. And TaylorMade says a by-product of this process is added durability with the risk of blemishes and scratches being minimized due to the absence of paint. 

Meanwhile, TaylorMade have placed two tungsten weights on the rear edges of the putter to increase the MOI this putter provides and help reduce the amount how much the club twists through each putting stroke. The club's face also improves on its stability, with its Pure Roll insert providing a smooth feel and nice sound on impact with the golf ball. It is certainly a very clean and more durable finish than what we saw in 2020 and Hydro Blast itself is one of TaylorMade's most popular clubs of all time.  

TaylorMade Spider GT Split Back Putter

(Image credit: MHopley)

Reasons to buy

+
Clear alignment lines
+
Solid feel at impact from insert
+
Stbale and forgiving

Reasons to avoid

-
Forward shaft lean could be less

Utilizing the same perimeter weighting design on the TaylorMade Spider GT putter (opens in new tab) the Splitback aims to push most of the club's weight away from its center, to increase its MOI and stability through impact. While the GT has an aluminum cover over the gap between the wings, the Splitback features an open style back cavity which has a very clear alignment line that we used to help square up the ball. 

During our testing, we found that the club felt very solid on impact and sounded great too, giving off a pleasant ping noise, due in part to its tuning fork style head design. Like the GT, the face also features a Pure Roll 2 insert that is set at a 45º angle to improve the roll of the ball at impact, which might we add was very smooth. While some golfers may not like how your hands will sit slightly ahead of the ball on this putter, we found the Splitback to be one of the best mallet putters (opens in new tab) currently on the market, thanks to its excellent design, perfect weighting and useful alignment tools. 

TaylorMade Spider GT Rollback Putter

(Image credit: MHopley)

Reasons to buy

+
Generous head size
+
Good alignment lines
+
Forgiving on off-centre hits

Reasons to avoid

-
Feels lighter than other GT models

This club is designed to help you hit clean shots through its 'Stability Roll Bar' around which is situated around the rear of its head. This moves the center of gravity back, creating a more forgiving club that doesn't twist if you strike the ball off-center. With the weight being around the back there is not as much stability support through the stroke as the other mallet in the range, the TaylorMade Spider GT Notchback putter. But this club is a very forgiving offering that also features some very clear alignment lines on the back of its head. 

While it features the same Pure Roll face insert as the Spider X putter, you'll notice this ball does feel slightly firmer and sounds a pitch higher on impact. Interestingly though, the head is the same weight as the other Spider GT putters but does play a little lighter and that could be more beneficial for those who need more forgiveness or prefer a simple clean mallet putter. If you are one of those people, make sure to check out our guide on the most forgiving putters (opens in new tab).

TaylorMade Spider GT Notchback Putter

(Image credit: MHopley)

Reasons to buy

+
Excellent stability
+
Large head for more forgiveness
+
Good feel from Pure Roll 2 insert
+
Great alignment lines

Reasons to avoid

-
Quite a thick top line

Similar to the TaylorMade Rollback putter, the Spider GT Notchback is a larger mallet putter that aims to provide more stability through your putting stroke. The main difference between this and the Rollback though comes in the form of a notched back section at the rear of the club, which moves weight further away to the edges of the putter to help increase stability through your stroke. It also features a long alignment line on the back of the clubhead which acts as a handy aiming tool helping golfers get the ball closer to the hole.  

It does feel slightly heavier than the Rollback, which we thought was another great aspect of this club and can help improve the tempo of your putting stroke. But the club does come across a little chunky thanks to its thick leading edge that might not appeal to all golfers.  

This club is suitable for all golfers but will really suit those who struggle with alignment and putting consistency. Its tungsten stability bars keep the clubface square through impact, which is a great feature that helps ensure even your off-center hits have a good chance of getting to the hole. If you're in the market for a new mallet putter then be sure to check out our guide on the best mallet putters (opens in new tab)

TaylorMade TP Hydro Blast Bandon 3 Putter, putter with grass background, sole of putter

Reasons to buy

+
Elegant style
+
Provides a solid, stable feel
+
Squares up naturally 
+
Suitable for a variety of strokes

Reasons to avoid

-
Produces sun glare from certain directions

The first thing we noticed with the Bandon 3 is its looks, the club really does look outstanding thanks to the sandstone finish. A true premium design. Dustin Johnson seemed to agree too as it is a model that has occasionally frequented his tour setup. The fang design lends itself to easy alignment, and this is enhanced by the black sightline. Indeed the putter also sits flush to the ground and the winged shape helps players square the club to the golf ball at impact too.

Overall we felt it had a similar feel to a blade putter but in a mallet form which means it may suit a wide range of players. Off the face, it feels solid and offers up a surprisingly firm and loud sound at impact given the deep grooves on the face insert.

TaylorMade Spider S Putter, taylormade putter with golf ball, putter with grass background

Reasons to buy

+
Lovely new alignment option on the crown
+
High levels of forgiveness and stability

Reasons to avoid

-
Not much different to last year's Spider S

Not much has changed versus last year's Spider S, but the 2021 refresh has brought with it a new alignment tool on the top of the crown and a new, slightly softer face insert. The new TruPath alignment, which can also be found on the Spider SR, is the exact width of a golf ball and provides golfers a great focal point on the putter head in which to consistently line the ball up and strike it out of the center of the face.

Being a mallet, this is a very stable and forgiving putter and the new alignment only helps in striking the ball consistently on the greens. With the placement of tungsten throughout the putter, the club really excels on feel and distance control, making it very effective when putting from long range. 

TaylorMade Spider EX Putter, taylormade putter with golf ball, putter with grass background

Reasons to buy

+
Sounds and feels good on clubface
+
Great over longer putts 
+
Vivid alignment cues
+
Very forgiving on miss-hits

Reasons to avoid

-
Curved shape might not suit all

The TaylorMade Spider EX is another great addition to the incredibly popular Spider family of putters and there are some key inclusions that make it stand out. The new True Path system on the top of the head makes it much easier to aim thanks to the reflective white dots that dominate the eye-line. These three dots between the dual rail also make lining up the ball super simple and help keep the face square at impact.

Away from alignment, the Spider EX is also a remarkably forgiving putter when you don’t strike it out of the centre. This is thanks to the aluminium frame and carbon composite head that increase the MOI for a more consistent roll and forgiveness across the face. The adjusted Pure Roll insert has a softer feel and the new Fluted Feel shaft made in conjunction with KBS has added to the altogether lovely and comfortable feel of this putter. It is slightly less angular than last year’s Spider X and is a very forgiving and easy to align mallet putter.

TaylorMade Spider SR Putter, putter with golf ball, taylormade putter with grass background

Reasons to buy

+
Incredibly stable 
+
Creates a consistent roll off the face
+
Premium looks

Reasons to avoid

-
Not great for those who like to roll the putter

Another member of the TaylorMade's popular Spider family, the Spider SR is designed to be one of the most stable putters in the Spider range. SR stands for Stability Refined and that stability comes from the Tour-inspired winged shape which features two back weights for the highest MOI performance.

The Spider SR has the same TPU Pure Roll face insert that is used in the Spider EX, making for a soft feel with consistent roll allowing golfers to maximize their pace control on the greens. The biggest difference between the Spider SR and the rest of the Spider range is, of course, the looks. But they also help to aid your aim, with the SR’s arrow alignment tool being very helpful at keeping the clubhead square through impact. If you’re after a forgiving mallet, then you should definitely consider the Spider SR which is also featured on our list of the most forgiving putters (opens in new tab) currently on the market.

TaylorMade TP Patina Collection Juno Putter

Reasons to buy

+
Classic blade shape and finish
+
Tour proven performance
+
Excellent balance

Reasons to avoid

-
May not be the easiest to align

This is one of the most traditional and clean-looking putters in TaylorMade’s line-up and was in the bag of Collin Morikawa (opens in new tab) when he landed the PGA Championship in 2020. In fact he still uses a putter with the Juno shape today. The American had been searching high and low for the right putter and he’d been through the range when he settled upon the Juno.

With his particular putter they flattened the lie angle a touch and off he went. The TP Patina Collection comprises a mix of classic blades and modern mallets to suit a variety of strokes and preferences. They offered a firm solid feel with a loud pop sound at impact which we enjoyed. Feel is enhanced by the SuperStroke Pistol GT 1.0 grip while the stepless KBS CT Tour steel shaft tops off what is an excellent all-round putter offering very good value.

truss-putters-rear-web

(Image credit: Future)

Reasons to buy

+
Blade putter with malet-like assistance
+
Technology hidden nicely at address
+
Great for providing smooth ball roll

Reasons to avoid

-
A fairly pricey club

Dustin Johnson (opens in new tab) is renowned for mixing things up at the putter end of the bag and he first tried the Truss mallet before putting the TB1 into play and winning at the Travelers. He has grown up using a blade but enjoys the benefits of a mallet so this was ideal and it offered him more stability.

To enhance the quality of the roll all the Truss putters have the same Surlyn insert found in the Spider putters while the grooves are designed to get the ball rolling rather than skidding. According to TaylorMade’s data, this Truss TB1 blade deflects 61.5% less than a standard heel-toe blade while the center-shafted TB2 is up at 80.3%. As such we also included the Truss in our most forgiving putters (opens in new tab) guide.

How We Test Putters

When it comes to product testing, our reviews and buyers' guides are built upon a rigorous testing procedure as well as the knowledge and experience of the test team. We test the putters outdoors on real greens with premium golf balls to get a thorough understanding of design features, feel, sound and looks. 

Ultimately, we aim to be as insightful and honest as possible in our reviews so it is important to acknowledge that no manufacturer can buy a good review. This is because our team tells it how it is. To learn more about testing methodology, see how Golf Monthly tests products (opens in new tab) in our guide. Putter testing is also headed up by Golf Monthly writer Martin Topley (opens in new tab), who is ably assisted by other members of the team including Technical Editor Joel Tadman (opens in new tab).

What to consider when buying a new putter

Considering the greens are where most golfers gain the most shots, the putter is arguably the most crucial clubs in your bag. We cannot stress the importance of having a good putter that gives you confidence when you address the golf ball and helps you sink putts. While TaylorMade are one of the best putter manufacturers, with several of their putters on the list above providing high-performance alternatives for golfers, there are a number of things every golfer needs to look out for when looking to purchase a new putter. 

Head Design

Putters come in a traditional blade, mid-mallet or a mallet design. All three styles have positives and negatives to them for every player and luckily lots of brands implement technologies across all three.

Mallet putters tend to be much larger than blades and they usually come in various shapes and sizes. This helps in a number of ways. A lot of the time most of the weight in a mallet putter can be found in the clubface however because of its design, weight can then be redistributed to other parts of the head which can help stabilize your stroke. The weight of the putter in the perimeter of the club-head offers better balance than what can be offered from a blade putter.

Mallet putters tend to also have a larger sweet spot which can be beneficial if you are a player who struggles to consistently strike your putts out of the middle of the face. The weight in the clubhead also helps here because it diminishes the twisting of the putter throughout the stroke too.

Additionally, if you struggle with alignment, a mallet putter could be the way to go as they usually have longer alignment lines. Alignment plays a crucial part in putting because it is all about accuracy and a mallet putter can be beneficial here by helping your eyes line up the putt.

A blade putter is a lot simpler in terms of design and will suit the traditionalists among you a lot more than some of the mallet putters pictured above. Blade putters also tend to suit players with an arc in their putting stroke because of the toe-weighted nature of the club-head.

Feel

Here, we're talking not just about the feel and sound the ball makes coming off the face, but how the putter feels in your hands.

A quieter sound contributes to a softer feel, whereas a louder sound usually translates into a firmer feel. A firmer feel is often the product of shallow grooves or no grooves at all on the face, where sound can't be dissipated as effectively. They work better with softer feeling golf balls, whereas soft-feeling putters work best with firmer golf balls.

You can get putters with adjustable weights in the sole that will alter the feel of the putter. For example, if your stroke is quite smooth and slow, a heavier putter will encourage that more. Jerky putters may prefer a lighter putter, although opting for more weight may reduce it, depending on what your goals are.

The putter grip plays a huge roll in the confidence you feel with a putter. Get one that feels right and sits in your hands comfortably while allowing you to return the putter back to the ball squarely and consistently.

Looks

You should get a putter that you like the look of as the aesthetics can play a role in inspiring or diminishing confidence on the greens. Blades won't offer as much alignment assistance but are still popular because of how they feel and the levels of forgiveness are increasing every year.

Mallet putters have more real estate, and can therefore provide more help to set the face squarely. Mid mallets are somewhere in the middle, offering a decent level of assistance without looking too cumbersome.

Value

Our final tip is to think about price because while there are some premium designs out there, there are also some models which offer excellent value. All putters will propel the ball towards the hole, but they do it in different ways. If performance is more important than looks or feel, there are lots of cut-price options out there that will do a good job and you can spend more money on other areas of your bag.

FAQs

What Tour pros use TaylorMade putters?

Several PGA Tour professionals, including Dustin Johnson, Colin Morikawa, Rory McIlroy and Sergio Garcia all use TaylorMade putters. 

What TaylorMade putters do the pros use?

TaylorMade's Spider X putter is one of the most popular among some of the worlds best golfers. 2020 Masters champion Dustin Johnson is currently playing with a limited edition Spider X Putter, while four-time major champion Rory McIlroy is currently using a Spider X Hydro Blast putter.

What are the most forgiving putters?

Mallet putters are the most forgiving putters. They are weighted towards the heel and the toe which helps to prevent the clubhead from twisting as you strike through the ball. That also improves the roll of the ball across the green. Take a look at our guide on the most forgiving putters (opens in new tab) for more information. 

A golfer for most of his life, Sam started playing the game to prove he was the best player out of his father and two brothers.
He quickly became a golf equipment expert and has always been the one family and friends come to for buying advice, and spends a lot of his time putting golf gear, apparel and shoes to the test.  
He is a graduate of Swansea University where he studied History and American Studies, and he has been a part of the Golf Monthly team since February 2018. He also previously worked for World Soccer and Rugby World magazines.

A jack of all trades across print and digital formats, Sam now spends most of his time testing and looking after golf gear content for the website. He also oversees all Tour player content as well. 

Unfortunately, Sam is not a member of any club at the moment but regularly gets out on the golf course to keep up the facade of having a handicap of five. 


Sam is currently playing:
Driver: Titleist TS3
Fairway Wood: TaylorMade M5 (15 degrees), Nike Covert Tour 2.0 (19 degrees)
Irons (4-PW): Titleist AP2
Wedges: Titleist Vokey SM7 54˚, 58˚
Putter: Scotty Cameron Circa 62 #6