Best Golf Drivers For Distance 2022

We review and compare the best golf drivers for distance that offer long carries through high launch and low spin

Best Golf Drivers For Distance
(Image credit: Future)

Best Golf Drivers For Distance

In case you weren't aware, the Tour pros are hitting the ball a bit further these days. Thanks to the top drivers out there, the top players are hitting the ball a long way largely because of brand new technology and research by golf club manufacturers.

The likes of Bryson DeChambeau, Wilco Nienaber and Dustin Johnson have all strived for more distance using the drivers listed below. Although we can't promise any of the following models will deliver you quite the numbers these pros can, there's no doubt that technology can help ramp up your own carry distance in 2022.

So what exactly makes a driver ideal for distance? Well first this can vary depending on the level of golfer but a common theme is getting the best optimization of launch possible, and making sure the spin characteristics are where they should be because if a driver spins the ball too much, it will balloon in the air. 

In this guide we've tested the best golf drivers for distance to give you an idea of how they could perform for you. Our best drivers 2022 video, below, offers an insight into how 21 different models performed. We hit all the low spin models designed with distance in mind and you can see how our launch monitor data compared between different brands.

As we've mentioned, lower spin is often the key ingredient for longer drivers, so we've highlighted the models in 2022 that offer this through positioning weight in different parts of the head and often making a more compact driver shape. However, this sort of set up won't suit every golfer, and the lower spinning, more compact heads in the drivers listed below are much less forgiving than the most forgiving drivers or best drivers for beginners.

Our expert club testers have personally tested every model we list below, so be sure to read the full reviews if you want to take a deeper dive into any of the models we've chosen. Our reviews include comparisons to older models as well as other models in the currents ranges to help you decide which driver will best suit your game. Also be sure to check out other guides of ours on drivers - such as the best golf drivers for mid handicappers, or the best high handicap drivers.

Best Golf Drivers For Distance

Cobra LTDx LS Driver Review

(Image credit: Future)

Specifications

Lofts : 9°, 10.5° & 12
Adjustable Hosel: Yes
Stock Shaft: HZRDUS Smoke iM10 60, HZRDUS Smoke RDX Blue 60 & UST Helium Nanocore 40/50
Left Handed Option: Yes, in all available lofts

Reasons to buy

+
Plenty of distance on offer for faster swingers
+
Impressice forgiveness for a low spin model
+
Sleek aesthetics 

Reasons to avoid

-
Lack of carry on offer for slower swingers

As you might expect, the LS in the Cobra (opens in new tab) LTDx name stands for low spin and as such, this driver is aimed squarely at those faster swinging players looking to control their flight and shape. Whilst we gained 3 yards through the air with the standard head, the lower flight of the LS version actually delivered one extra yard of overall distance.

Down behind the ball, this has a traditional shape and sleek aesthetic. The matte black crown that we saw in the Radspeed LS driver is back and to be honest the differences in terms of the visuals at address are minimal at best. We also like the small pops of orange around the head as well.

The forgiveness was also impressive for a lower spinning model and as such there is plenty of distance and consistency on offer here. 

Titleist TSi3 driver pictured outdoorsEditors Choice 2022

(Image credit: Future)

Specifications

Lofts : 8°, 9° & 10°
Adjustable Hosel: Yes
Stock Shaft: Kuro Kage Black DC 5G, Tensei AV Blue, HZRDUS Smoke Black RDX, Tensei AV White Raw
Left Handed Option: Yes, in all available lofts

Reasons to buy

+
Improved shaping at address
+
More effective adjustability

Reasons to avoid

-
Some may need more alignment assistance

The best Titleist drivers (opens in new tab) are often complete packages and the TSi3 continues that trend. It features a more compact, pear-shaped profile and a new SureFit CG Track positioned around the rear skirt, allowing players to alter their shot shape and launch characteristics.

We believe many golfers will also prefer how the sole weight setting is now visible – with the TS3 you had to unscrew and remove the weight to see what it was. With the multitude of settings and shafts available, some of which made it into our best driver shafts (opens in new tab) guide, a custom fitting is a must to get the most out of it, but with its more varied adjustability and extra forgiveness on offer it will appeal to a range of golfers, not just the better player. If you like the look of the best Titleist drivers, but don't like the idea of a lower spinning driver, the TSi2 driver will be a lot more forgiving. 

TaylorMade Stealth Plus Driver review

(Image credit: Future)

Specifications

Lofts : 8°, 9° & 10.5°
Adjustable Hosel: Yes
Stock Shaft: Kai'li White 60 & HZRDUS Smoke RDX Red
Left Handed Option: Yes, only in 9° or 10.5°

Reasons to buy

+
Consistently impressive ball speeds
+
Compact aesthetics will suit better player
+
Premium, modern look

Reasons to avoid

-
Red face will divide opinion

Over the last few years, golfers have become used to seeing TaylorMade (opens in new tab) introduce new driver technologies in a bid to unlock more distance off the tee. For 2022, this promise comes in the shape of an all new carbon fibre face. To highlight this new technology, the face of the Stealth driver is red. Whilst this might not be to everyone’s taste, the chosen color is not too bright and down behind the ball is fairly recessive. We liked it. 

For the better player searching for a low-spin option off the tee, TaylorMade has produced the Stealth Plus. Returning after a year away from the SIM2 range is the moveable weight positioned just behind the face of the driver which can encourage a certain type of shot shape. This driver is aimed at those faster swinging golfers or those looking for a driver set-up to promote a certain shot shape.

In the same loft and shaft set up, the Stealth Plus was the lowest launching and spinning of the three new TaylorMade heads. For us, it was also the longest, producing outstanding ball speed, carry and total distance performance. So if you like the look of the Stealth range and are looking for pure distance from your driver, look no further. 

Callaway Rogue ST Max LS Driver Review

(Image credit: Future)

Specifications

Lofts : 9° & 10.5°
Adjustable Hosel: Yes
Stock Shaft: Mitsubishi Tensei AV Blue (55 or 65), Mitsubishi Tensei AV White (65 or 75) & Fujikura Ventus Blue 5
Left Handed Option: Yes, in all available lofts

Reasons to buy

+
Consistently high ball speeds offer impressive distance
+
Attractive, compact shape at address
+
Improved sound and feel

Reasons to avoid

-
Slightly higher spinning than we were expecting

Designed to offer low spin within a high MOI head for greater forgiveness, the Rogue ST Max LS features many of the same technologies as the Callaway Rogue ST Max while being aimed at those confident, fast-swinging golfers off the tee. 

The number that really stood out during our testing was the raw ball speed. At 168mph, it would be fair to say this was one of the fastest drivers we have ever hit. Interestingly, we did hit some shots off centre but they didn’t cause a huge drop-off in ball speed. We think this is a very playable but also very long driver. It offers hugely impressive distance and comes in a shape that will attract those in search of a classic, compact look down behind the ball.

Although it must be said we weren't huge fans of the clock face graphics on the head, but if this doesn't bother you, then this Callaway (opens in new tab) driver is definitely worth considering if you want a model for out and out distance.

Ping G425 LST Driver

(Image credit: Golf Monthly)

Specifications

Lofts: 9.5° & 10.5°
Adjustable Hosel: Yes
Stock Shaft : Ping Tour 65 (5 other options available)
Left Handed Option: Yes, in all available lofts

Reasons to buy

+
Lower spin created more distance than the Max model.
+
Surprisingly forgiving for a low spin model.

Reasons to avoid

-
Compact look is fairly intimidating at address.

The G425 LST model has a more pear-shaped head that the standard Ping G425 Max driver and measures 445cc to deliver spin reductions of approximately 200 rpm compared to the G410 LST and 500-700 rpm versus the G425 Max.

It employs a 17-gram CG shifter in the same three settings to fit the launch conditions best suited to the golfer’s swing and desired ball flight. We found it offered around 200 rpm less than the Max model which, despite not being a super low spinning model, still offered more distance as well as a surprising degree of forgiveness and consistency given its smaller size. When testing up against the outgoing G410 we also noticed the G425 LST, and indeed the whole range, seemed to generally fly straighter, lose less distance and curve less on mishits.

Honma TR20 440 Driver

(Image credit: Golf Monthly)

Specifications

Lofts : 8.5°, 9.5° & 10.5°
Adjustable Hosel: Yes
Stock Shaft : Vizard Graphite (50g, 60g, 70g)
Left Handed Option: No

Reasons to buy

+
Variety of adjustability
+
Compact looks

Reasons to avoid

-
Lacks off-centre forgiveness

Whilst this particular Honma model may lack off-centre forgiveness, the positives far outweigh the negatives. It features a near-total carbon body around the lightweight titanium frame to help deliver distance and accuracy.

Meanwhile, the sole features three strategically positioned weights, with a possible five options (3, 6, 9, 12, 15g) to optimize launch conditions and swing weight. With a fitting, it's likely to give you some impressive numbers and help maximize distance.  The weight system with the slots front, back and in the heel allows you to add draw bias if you wish, although you could argue the target player would rather want to increase fade bias. That said, there are enough settings to really optimize launch and spin based on your swing speed and delivery to the finest of details. To get the maximum low spin performance out of this driver, you can move the heavier weight to the front. Looks-wise, the simple, traditional crown design also gets the nod.

Tour Edge Exotics C722 Driver Review

(Image credit: Scott Kramer)

Specifications

Lofts : 9.5° & 10.5°
Adjustable Hosel: Yes
Stock Shaft: Fujikura Ventus Red, Fujikura Ventus Blue & Mitsubishi Tensei AV Raw Blue
Left Handed Option: Yes, only in 10.5°

Reasons to buy

+
Fantastic look and sound
+
Crown graphics are really nice
+
Distance is comparable to many competitors, but at a lower price

Reasons to avoid

-
The shaft we tried felt a little whippy, causing the rare miss to draw strongly

The “C” in Tour Edge Exotics C722 driver name stands for a compact 445cc clubhead – which nicely complements the deep face with minimal offset. This is aimed at better players looking for one of the best golf drivers of 2022 but without paying the premium price of some other top brands.

Like its sibling Tour Edge Exotics E722 driver model, this sports a thin “Ridgeback” spine acting as a brace that runs from the clubface center through the crown and connecting with a new sole plate rail, that produces a powerful impact sound. An adjustable hosel allows you to alter the base 9.5- and 10.5-degree lofts by +/- 2 degrees, and lie angle through a range of 3 degrees. And the shaft is scientifically paired for every flex.

In our testing we loved the ball flight. Hit it on the money and your drive goes far. Miss it a little high or low, and it seems to provide plenty of forgiveness in two ways – it gets close to your desired trajectory and it still seems to want to eke out some extra distance.

Srixon ZX7 Driver

(Image credit: Golf Monthly)

Specifications

Lofts : 9.5° & 10.5°
Adjustable Hosel: Yes
Stock Shaft: HZRDUS Smoke Black 60
Left Handed Option: Yes, in all available lofts

Reasons to buy

+
Solid, explosive feel
+
Offers very good value

Reasons to avoid

-
Hosel adjustability system appears complicated

Srixon is a brand that goes under the radar but actually makes some impressive product competing with the very best in multiple categories, including drivers. The ZX7 represents a big improvement over the Z 785 model, thanks in part to the stock shaft but also from the redesign of the clubhead.

It's designed for the slightly lower handicapper, who will like the smaller, more rounded profile. It has a simple, no frills look on top with a glossy carbon crown and a very subtle alignment mark to minimize distractions over the ball.

The numbers were impressive, too, and we topped out at 280 yards. The flight was strong but reducing spin through further tweaks during a fitting could almost certainly eek out some extra yards, especially when you consider the complexity of the adjustable hosel system. 

Callaway Epic Max LS Driver

(Image credit: Golf Monthly)

Specifications

Lofts: 9° & 10.5°
Adjustable Hosel: Yes
Stock Shaft : Mitsubishi MMT 60 and 70
Left Handed Option: Yes, in all available lofts

Reasons to buy

+
Surprisingly high off-centre forgiveness
+
Large profile inspires confidence at address

Reasons to avoid

-
Low spin won’t suit everyone

The Epic Max LS is the better player model within the Epic 21 driver range. It features a 13g sliding weight in the back allows you to tune an exact shot shape of preference, providing 14 yards of shot shape correction. Having the weight at the back of the head instead of the front - see the TaylorMade Stealth Plus' sliding weight - probably makes this one of the most forgiving low spinning drivers in this list, but there's still plenty of distance to be had. The head is powerful, solid and stable in equal measure with a relatively high pitched sound at impact - a sound we really enjoyed.

We found this driver to be the longest and most playable of the three models in the Epic 21 range with the sliding weight allowing us to fine-tune shot shape, so is certainly one to consider if you're thinking about an upgrade in 2022.

How we test drivers

When it comes to product testing (opens in new tab), our reviews and buyers' guides are built upon a rigorous testing procedure as well as the knowledge and experience of the test team. Headed up by Neil Tappin, and assisted by Joel Tadman, both have been testing golf clubs for years and both play to a handicap of 5. Both are also able to efficiently test the vast majority of the biggest product releases and convey the pros and cons eloquently.

Getting into specifics for drivers, we first attend product launches and speak to manufacturer's to understand the technology. We then hit the golf clubs indoors, usually at Foresight Sports and test the products with premium golf balls on a launch monitor.

Outdoor testing is the next port of call and this usually takes place at West Hill Golf Club, a course in Surrey with top-notch practice facilities. Ultimately, we aim to be as insightful and honest as possible in our reviews so it is important to acknowledge that no manufacturer can buy a good review. This is because our team tells it how it is.

What to consider when buying a driver

You've probably already asked yourself whether you need to buy a new driver in 2022, but there's a few key things to consider when investing in a new driver. Hopefully answering these questions will narrow your search down slightly and make comparing between various models much easier. 

What is your priority? - Have a think about what is the most important thing for you when it comes to the driver. If accuracy is what you're after, go for something with a high MOI or adjustable weights to help alter spin and flight characteristics.

If distance is key to you, which is probably why you are on this guide, look at a low-spinning driver to help ensure your ball doesn't balloon too much. Or if you want forgiveness, then a larger head will probably suit you the best. Many brands make different models for different levels of player, this explains why Cobra has three different LTDx heads, and Titleist has the TSi1 to TSi4 range. 

Adjustability - Most models these days come with a degree of adjustability whether it be loft, weight movement, shaft and so on. Therefore have a think about how important adjustability is to you because you can change the characteristics of a club if you want to. Alternatively you can just keep things simple with other models as well.

Looks - You have to like how a golf club looks especially when looking down on the golf ball. So make sure you go and take a look at how different models look in your hands and down by the golf ball.

Budget - Finally be aware of your budget. You can go for more premium models, such as the TaylorMade Stealth, or you can go for cheaper designs from Cobra instead. Wherever you fall in terms of price point, there is something for everyone.

Custom fitting - This is probably the most essential part of the driver buying process, no matter the driver you're after or how good you are at the game. A custom fit session will make sure you get the right flex and length of shaft, correct loft and correct head for your game, meaning you'll finish with a driver that will be as suitable as possible for you out on course.

FAQ's

Which driver gets the most distance?

There is no one simple answer to this question because it will vary for every single golfer. But we have found there are specific models that do go further in our testing and they are included in our specific best drivers for distance guide. 

If you enjoyed this guide make sure you take a look at some of our other driver posts on the best drivers for seniors (opens in new tab), or best budget drivers (opens in new tab)

Neil Tappin
Neil Tappin

In his current role, Neil is responsible for testing drivers and golf balls. Having been a part of the Golf Monthly team for over 15 years and playing off a handicap of 3, he has the experience to compare performance between models, brands and generations. For 2022 he thinks the main trend in drivers is: "In a word, consistency. Whilst all the brands are talking about ball speed (and the new drivers are certainly long), my biggest finding has been how much more consistent the ball flights are. Mishits don't seem to be causing the same level of drop-off or increase in the spin numbers. This means that more shots seem to be flying the way you want them to!" As far as golf balls are concerned the biggest development is in the, "three piece, non-Tour, urethane-covered section. For regular golfers, these models offer superb performance at both ends of the bag without denting your wallet quite as much as the premium Tour-played options."


Originally working with the best coaches in the UK to produce instruction content, he is now the brand's Digital Editor and covers everything from Tour player interviews to gear reviews. In his time at Golf Monthly, he has covered equipment launches that date back well over a decade. He clearly remembers the launch of the Callaway and Nike square drivers as well as the white TaylorMade driver families, such as the RocketBallz! If you take a look at the Golf Monthly YouTube channel, you'll see his equipment videos dating back over a decade! He has also conducted 'What's In The Bag' interviews with many of the game's best players like Rory McIlroy, Dustin Johnson and Jon Rahm. Over the years, Neil has tested a vast array of products in each category and at drastically different price-points. 

Neil is currently playing: Driver: TaylorMade Stealth Plus Fairway Wood: Titleist TSi2 Hybrid: Titleist TS3 Irons (4-9): Mizuno JPX 919 Forged Wedges: Titleist Vokey SM7 46˚, 50˚, 54˚, 60˚ Putter: Odyssey Triple Track Ten Ball: Titleist Pro V1X

With contributions from