Best Voice Caddie Rangefinders 2023

We run through some of the best Voice Caddie rangefinders, including GPS watches and lasers, currently available on the market

Best Voice Caddie Rangefinders
(Image credit: Golf Monthly)

Best Voice Caddie Rangefinders

The golf technology industry has certainly grown in the past 10 years, with it clear that amateur golfers are now able to benefit from some of the high quality data and analytics tools that were once only available to professional golfers. Due to there being an array of companies on the market that specialize in golf technology, it can be difficult to decide on which brand to go for. One of the leading manufacturers is Voice Caddie, a brand that is constantly pushing the boundaries on what golf gadgets are capable of. 

From some of the best golf watches (opens in new tab) to some great portable launch monitors (opens in new tab), the brand is well known in the golf world for the quality it packs into its products. One category the company is particularly well known for is its excellent laser rangefinders - we recently crowned the SL2 Active Hybrid as the best golf rangefinder this year. Voice Caddie produces a range of premium lasers that are both durable and range in cost, catering to different budgets a golfer may have. 

In this guide, we take a look through the best Voice Caddie rangefinders, with its products also featuring among some of the best budget rangefinders (opens in new tab), best rangefinders with slope (opens in new tab) and best rangefinders for under $100.

Best Voice Caddie Rangefinders

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Voice Caddie SL2 Active GPS Hybrid Laser ReviewEditors Choice 2022

(Image credit: Future)
A stunning blend of aesthetics, GPS technology and functionality

Specifications

Range: 1,000 yards
Magnification: x6
Protection: N/A
Battery life: Laser mode 45 hours, GPS mode 20 hours

Reasons to buy

+
Combines GPS and laser functionality
+
Lots of extra, useful features
+
Easy to use
+
Premium look and feel

Reasons to avoid

-
Battery life could be improved

The cutting edge SL2 Active GPS Hybrid from Voice Caddie is sure to be popular amongst Tour players and club golfers who are keen to shoot lower scores and improve their game. To begin with, there are numerous features available in what is a state-of-the-art device. Arguably, the most impressive parts are the hole layouts and green yardages, with the rangefinder providing a bird’s eye view of the hole to help you to identify danger. It also gives you a green light of when to attack. 

However, what really sets this model apart is the undulation data that it provides. Each green looks like a heat map, with different colors highlighting the severity of the slopes up ahead on the putting surface. Finally, the design team at Voice Caddie took its inspiration from luxury yachts and, as such, it has white leather and aluminum exterior which really is premium. The case adds to that allure as well.

Voice Caddie L5 Rangefinder

(Image credit: Mark Townsend)
Perfect for those who want a simple to use rangefinder

Specifications

Range: 1,200 yards
Magnification: x7
Protection: N/A
Battery Life: N/A

Reasons to buy

+
Pin mode very quick to hit the target
+
Great price
+
Simple and straightforward

Reasons to avoid

-
No option for metres

When it comes to a rangefinder, some just want it to be simple to use and, with this Voice Caddie L5, that is certainly the case. Like many other models, it has Slope Functionality and it also has two modes - Normal and Pin, with the former useful for continuous scanning so, if you're picking out certain bunkers to avoid, then this is a great addition.

In Pin mode, the main reading that it gives you is the one that's been calculated with the Slope so below it will tell the actual distance and how much it's playing up or downhill. All distances come in yards and are even given in decimal places for that extra level of detail if you want it. 

The last noticeable aspect of the L5 is its size. It fits so easily into one hand that it makes it so straightforward to use. The case is sturdy and easy to get in and out of through an elasticated opening but, if you just want to have it quickly to hand, then it's so small that you can leave it in your pocket.

Voice Caddie T9 Golf GPS Watch Review

(Image credit: Tom Miles)
A user-friendly package with technology rarely seen in a golf watch

Specifications

Courses preloaded : 40,000+
Battery life: 27 Holes – 10 days Golf Mode - 27 holes
Screen size: 3cm
Weight : 48g

Reasons to buy

+
Bright, responsive touch screen
+
Plenty of strategy-enhancing features
+
Versatile for off-course wear

Reasons to avoid

-
Green undulations weren't always accurate
-
Automatic shot tracking wasn't obvious

Our first impression of the T9 was a good one. This watch is slick, modern and lightweight. With its shiny silver bezel, it has the off-course versatility that enhances its value. The LCD color touch screen is bright and readable in all light conditions and super responsive - it hardly requires any repeat swipes unless wearing a glove. 

It has the basics covered in terms of yardages on the main screen - front, middle and back - but you’ll notice a slope icon on the left. This is because it factors in slope on the distances for enhanced accuracy. It even shows green undulations via a heat map as well as telling you how much uphill or downhill a selected putt is! What's more, the main screen also displays the hole number and par as well as your current score, assuming you’re entering it as you go along.

Voice Caddie A2 GPS Watch Review

(Image credit: Howard Boylan)
Great value for money to be had with this user-friendly watch

Specifications

Courses preloaded: 40,000+
Battery life: 10 days/Golf Mode (GPS) 10 hours
Screen size: 1.9"
Weight: 50g

Reasons to buy

+
Simple to use
+
Interactive color hole maps
+
Option of slope adjusted distances

Reasons to avoid

-
Course can sometimes take a long to locate

This stylish, modern and waterproof sports watch is noticeably lightweight and the flexible white strap with a significant amount of buckle holes allows for a secure yet comfortable fit. Along with the fit, it is extremely easy to use. This is thanks to the A2 using a combination of the color touch screen and four corner buttons. You can use either, depending on your preference - for example, the right hand buttons double as up and down functions on certain menus, but you can swipe the screen up or down to achieve the same thing. 

Lastly, the touch screen itself is responsive enough and becomes brighter when you lift it up to look at it, a clever feature that no doubt saves on battery life too, with the A2 crammed with features and technology. It's a little more basic than the T9 and the price reflects this, but for most golfers it provides more than enough information to select the right club on every shot.

Voice Caddie Swing Caddie SC300i Launch Monitor

(Image credit: Future)
A compact, versatile radar-based option that can be used indoor and out

Specifications

Technology: Doppler Radar
Data: Swing/Ball speed, launch, apex, smash, carry
Weight: 437g
Battery life: 20 hours

Reasons to buy

+
Accurate, especially outdoors
+
Large display
+
Fairly easy to set up
+
Video feature with stats overlay on app

Reasons to avoid

-
A little larger and heavier than the competition, so not quite as convenient to put in a golf bag

This ultra-portable, doppler radar launch monitor is a new model that improves on what we saw with the SC300 by using atmospheric pressure sensors to provide more accurate data. 

It connects directly to the free MySwingCaddie V2 app on your smartphone or tablet via Bluetooth so users can track their performance in real-time. There's a voice output option of distance and a remote control that enhances the user convenience. It even includes video playback and analysis as well as increased battery life of up to 20 hours.

VC4 Voice Golf GPS

(Image credit: VC4 Voice Golf GPS)

Voice Caddie VC4 Voice Golf GPS

A very cool piece of tech that clips onto your hat and calls out distances

Specifications

Tech: V-algorithm
Weight: 28.5g
Battery life: 54 holes

Reasons to buy

+
Delivers accurate distances
+
Active green information 
+
Has a great battery life

Reasons to avoid

-
Doesn't display readings visually

Perhaps one of the most innovative rangefinders on this list, the VC4 Voice Golf GPS delivers readings to players verbally, making it an excellent product for those who don't want to have to keep looking at a screen. It comes in at 28.5g and is about two times the size of a standard golf ball marker. That means it can be clipped nicely onto your hat or belt and you won't even feel like its there!

You can then use it's V-algorithm software to calculate accurate distances to your target. It comes pre-loaded with over 40,000 golf courses and can map slope distance and carry distance to the green. It'll also help you read the greens too, providing dynamic assistance from wherever you're playing from on where best to chip the ball to. The final thing to mention is the smart battery on this device. While it aims to provide you with an impressive coverage over 54 holes in one charge, when its running low on juice, it'll also tell you how many holes you have left until the device is dead. 

How we test rangefinders?

At Golf Monthly we have a comprehensive testing procedure (opens in new tab) around DMDs (Distance Measurement Devices). As you would expect, this involves using different models out on the course, over a number of rounds and importantly in different conditions too because this gives us an idea on how particular models deal with sunlight, rain and wind. 

As the entire team are regular golfers, DMDs usually get a thorough testing and often get compared to one another side by side to test for things like accuracy, waterproofing, durability and other features. That way we can give honest and insightful feedback to you, the reader. The final thing we wanted to mention in this section is no manufacturer can buy a good review. Our testing team reviews golf equipment and makes its own opinion on how good or bad the product is. 

What to consider when buying a rangefinder?

Rangefinders don't come cheap. Especially if you're looking to buy one with all the latest bells and whistles, the best lasers on the market can set you back a fortune. And that's why you need to make sure you're buying the right DMD for your needs. When it comes to Voice Caddie, it's hard to go wrong! But here are some handy tips and things to bear in mind when buying your next laser rangefinder.

1. Accuracy

Nowadays, it's hard to find a laser rangefinder that is not accurate to one to two yards. Some cheaper models (opens in new tab) can be a little less reliable compared to some of the high-spec rangefinders on the market. So, if you're planning on hitting the greens from long range, you'll want to have a DMD that'll give you precise yardages to the hole. Be sure to check out our guide on the best rangefinders (opens in new tab) for more advice on top-spec models.

2. Distance 

Different rangefinders deliver different maximum distances and depending on the type of courses you're playing or what you're planning on using your DMD for, you may want to consider the distance it offers. The greater the distance, the better chance you'll have of getting accurate readings on greens that are far away. 

3. Slope

Do you want your model to offer slope measurements too? If so check out the technical specifications of certain models. Always be careful here though, because if a model is not clear on whether it is in slope mode or not, if you use it in competition you could be in trouble. 

4. Waterproofing

A good model will work just as well in the rain as it will in the sun, which makes waterproofing important. Here we would recommend doing research on which models offer full waterproof protection, and those that are only water-resistant as that can be a big difference especially if you play a lot of golf in the rain.

5. Convenience

Speaking of convenience, rangefinders have to be quick and easy to use. Get it out, measure the flag, put it away in its case. If a laser is complicated or takes a while to display a measurement, then it adds time rather than saves it. To work this out, we would often recommend trying out some models in retailers and pro shops.

If you're looking for some amazing deals on golf technology, then why not also check out our guides to the best GolfBuddy rangefinders (opens in new tab), best Garmin golf watches (opens in new tab) and best Bushnell Golf Rangefinders (opens in new tab).

FAQs

What distance can rangefinders measure?

A golf rangefinder can usually measure from 1 yard up to 900 yards in distance, with most picking out the flag from up to 450 yards away. That allows players to gain accurate distances from their ball to the green pretty much wherever they are on the course. 

Should I buy a rangefinder with slope settings?

That depends on whether you like to play tournament golf or not. Slope settings can be a great way to help you ascertain distances that are up and down hills on courses. But you often are not allowed to use slope rangefinders in tournaments. Rangefinders without slope can sometimes be cheaper too, but you can also find products that allow you to turn the slope settings on and off. 

Do rangefinders tell you what club to use?

Typically, no. They only tell you the distance from where you are currently stood to the hole or the point of interest you are looking at. But that enables you to work out what club you want to use to get you to the green. That does rely on you knowing the distances you hit each club, but you can work that out by using a rangefinder.

Ed Carruthers
Writer

Ed has been playing golf for as long as he can remember and is obsessive about the sport. He is regularly sought after by family members and friends for advice on what equipment to buy and uses his background, having written extensively on golf in the past, to produce equipment orientated content for Golf Monthly.  

Having obtained a Masters in Law with Medicine from the University of Liverpool, Ed has recently changed paths into journalism and just last year achieved his NCTJ Sports Journalism Diploma with the Press Association. 

He has written for a variety of media outlets over the years and has interviewed some big names in sport, including Premier League managers, All Blacks Coaches and Grand Slam tennis superstars. He has also worked on some huge sporting events, including the 2021 Australian Open and the 2022 FIFA World Cup. And when he's not writing for Golf Monthly, you'll find him producing news and feature articles for the MailOnline's sports desk, where he covers everything from football to rugby union. 

During his weekends off, you'll likely find Ed heading out for a round at one of his local golf clubs with his friends, and was, up until recently, a member at the Leatherhead Golf Club in Surrey. Ed also plays the saxophone, can tell you some pretty terrible dad jokes and can knock up a very tasty carbonara!