Best Golf Balls for Slow Swing Speeds

Most club golfers aren't blessed with tour pro swing speeds, hence the need for our guide to the best golf balls for slow swing speeds

best golf balls for slow swing speeds
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Best Golf Balls for Slow Swing Speeds

Although swing speed is talked about more than ever before, many golfers won’t really know what theirs is. So, what might be considered a slower swing speed?

How far you hit it off the tee with a driver is certainly a major clue. TrackMan data accumulated over several years has revealed that the ‘average’ mid-teen-handicap, male golfer has a swing speed of 93.4mph with the driver and hits it 214 yards.

If you don’t hit it as far as that, your swing would be in the slower half of golf’s swing speed spectrum, and you could be just the sort of golfer to benefit most from the ball models we showcase here.

While many club golfers lean towards the best golf balls, their slower swing speeds won’t reap maximum benefit from those models when it comes to distance.

The superior short-game performance those balls also offer may still make that a price worth paying for some, but for others, getting as much distance as possible out of their swings will be a more pressing priority. Thankfully nearly all ball manufacturers make models designed to help them do just that.

If you’re aware that you’re not up there with the big boys (or girls) in terms of swing speed, whether that’s down to age (old or young), technique or perhaps injury, there are plenty of balls on the market that will help you squeeze a little more mileage out of what you do potentially have in the tank.

And the good news is that, because these are typically not the tour-calibre models, you’ll be shelling out less for your ammo too.

Read on to find out more about nine of the best golf balls for slow swing speeds. You might also find other models of interest in some of our other ball guides, such as the best distance golf balls or the best golf balls for beginners.

Best Golf Balls for Slow Swing Speeds

Callaway Supersoft Max golf balls

Callaway Supersoft Max golf balls

Reasons to buy
+An ideal all-round performer for average swing speeds+Some may find its extra size confidence-inspiring and therefore easier to it
Reasons to avoid
-Others may not be able to adjust to the ball’s larger-than-standard size

Magna becomes Max in the latest incarnation of Callaway’s larger-than-standard low-compression golf ball, which you’ll be pleased to know conforms to the Rules of Golf.

The Callaway Supersoft Max features a high-speed, low-compression core for better energy transfer at slower swing speeds and a super-soft feel.

Its Tri-Blend ionomer cover helps further on the speed front, while also promoting a high-launching, low-spinning ball flight for more distance.

The oversize design is said to bring forgiveness too by increasing confidence over the ball and promoting more consistent contact.

TaylorMade Soft Response golf ball

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Reasons to buy
+Strong, true flight even in windy conditions+Shallower U-shaped dimples decrease drag and increase lift
Reasons to avoid
-Not quite as much spin control as the sister Tour Response model

The TaylorMade Soft Response is one of two Response models sitting beneath the brand's premium TP5 product, along with the Tour Response ball.

Soft Response has been designed with moderate swing speeds in mind, offering all-round performance with a softer feel, courtesy of a soft but durable ionomer cover.

The ZnO Flex 35-compression core helps maximise energy transfer at impact, with the Extended Flight Dimple pattern promoting decreased drag and increased lift. This allows the ball to stay in the air for longer at lower spin rates. Available in white, yellow or pink.

To have an in-depth look at the current TaylorMade ball range, have a read of our best TaylorMade golf balls guide.

Mizuno RB566 golf ball

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Reasons to buy
+Extra hang time keeps the ball in the air for longer+Ideal choice for mid to low swing speeds in warm conditions
Reasons to avoid
-The cover is highly durable but not the softest

A large, high-energy core, the unique 566-dimple cover and a soft-compression design hold the keys to the Mizuno RB566’s excellent distance credentials and prolonged ball flight.

The core generates a straighter, more stable ball flight while the 566 micro-dimple design delays the rate of descent to eke out more yards

One of the best golf balls for slow swing speeds. Available in white, yellow or orange.

Titleist Tour Soft golf ball

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Reasons to buy
+Impressive hang time even in windy conditions+Brighter finish makes this ball stand out more for added confidence
Reasons to avoid
-Won’t quite match the short-game spin of the flagship Pro V1

The latest Tour Soft features Titleist’s largest-ever core and an ultra-thin 4CE grafted cover, which combine for more distance and more short-game spin than the previous model.

The new spherically-tiled 342 cuboctahedron dimple design is geared up for a penetrating ball flight that’s more stable when the wind gets up.

The Tour Soft ranks among the very best non urethane-covered balls for feel, so is highly playable around the greens too.

Given its performance during testing, we found this to be one of the best soft feel golf balls out there and it also comes with a reasonable price tag too so we included it in our guide on the best mid price golf balls as well. Definitely a model to consider.

Honma TW-S golf ball

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Reasons to buy
+Specifically aimed at swing speeds of around 85mph+Particularly good in windy conditions
Reasons to avoid
-May launch a little low for some golfers

Honma has launched the TW-S ball as a sister product to the TW-X model, targeting those with slightly slower swings speeds (around 85mph rather than 90mph+ for the TW-X). Its fast core promises faster ball speeds off the clubface.

The TW-S differs from the TW-X is two key ways. It has a softer feel, which many golfers prefer particularly as they get closer to the green.

And it offers higher spin with a lower launch, making it a good choice for slower swingers who typically find themselves battling the wind at their home course. 

Srixon Soft Feel golf ball

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Reasons to buy
+This 12th generation model is the longest Srixon Soft Feel to date+Thin cover improves greenside feel and spin.
Reasons to avoid
-May feel a little too soft off the face for some

Srixon’s latest Soft Feel model has been engineered to help slower-swinging golfers max out their distances while retaining excellent greenside feel.

At the heart of the Soft Feel lies Srixon’s softest FastLayer Core, which is soft in the centre and firmer around its outer edges. Srixon says this design snaps the ball back into shape more quickly after impact for added ball speed.

It also helps reduce long-game sidespin meaning improved accuracy on certain misdirected shots. The 338 Speed Dimple Pattern reduces drag and increases lift for better performance in windy conditions.

Inesis Soft 500 golf ball

Inesis Soft 500 golf ball

Reasons to buy
+Low compression helps slower swinger create better energy transfer+An extremely inexpensive option
Reasons to avoid
-Only claims to offer moderate grip around the greens

This Inesis Soft 500 two-piece ball from Decathlon has a low compression, so those not blessed with the fastest of swings can optimise their distances. The low compression allows them to generate better energy transfer at impact, which then translates into those added yards.

Despite its name, it’s not the softest ball, but is eminently playable around the greens. Perhaps the biggest attraction, though, is its price – less per dozen than some lake balls! This makes it a good option for those who prefer to play with new balls but don’t have a limitless budget.

Available in white, orange, yellow and a very vivid pink in both standard and matte finishes.

Pinnacle Soft golf ball

Pinnacle Soft golf ball

Reasons to buy
+Designed for added distance off both driver and irons+Should go slightly further than the sister Rush model at slower swing speeds
Reasons to avoid
-Slightly softer than previous generations which may not appeal to all

The Pinnacle name has long been associated with good-value distance golf balls and the latest Rush and Soft models are no exception.

The high-energy core drives performance, generating faster ball speeds with every club. The icosahedral dimple design, with 332 dimples in a soft, durable ionomer cover, promises a consistent, powerful ball flight.

Slower Swingers may eke a little more distance out of the Soft model, while also enjoying its softer feel around the greens.

Vice Drive golf ball

Vice Drive golf ball

Reasons to buy
+One of the best budget-priced balls for low to mid swing speeds+Cut-resistant Surlyn cover promises excellent durability
Reasons to avoid
-That durable cover may feel too firm to some around the greens

The Vice Drive ball is specifically targeted at low to mid swing speed golfers, with its soft Energy Speed Core helping them generate extra distance. As such it also made it into our guide on the best golf balls for seniors as well.

The cut-resistant Surlyn cover boosts durability, while wedge spin rates are higher in the latest Drive model for improved control from closer range.

If you found this guide on the best golf balls for slow swing speeds informative, browse the Golf Monthly website.

Jeremy Ellwood
Jeremy Ellwood

Jeremy Ellwood has worked in the golf industry since 1993 and for Golf Monthly since 2002 when he started out as equipment editor. He is now a freelance journalist writing mainly for Golf Monthly across the whole spectrum from courses and Rules to equipment and even instruction despite his own somewhat iffy swing (he knows how to do it, but just can't do it himself). He also edits The Golf Club Secretary Newsletter, has authored or co-authored three books and written for a number of national papers including The Telegraph and The Independent. He is a senior panelist for Golf Monthly's Top 100 UK & Ireland Course Rankings and has played all of the Top 100 plus 89 of the Next 100. He has played well over 900 courses worldwide in 35 countries, but put him on a links course anywhere and he will be blissfully content. On his first trip to Abu Dhabi a decade ago he foolishly asked Paul Casey what sort of a record he had around the course there. "Well, I've won it twice if that's what you mean!" came the reply...