Best Left-Handed Golf Drivers 2024

We run through the best left-handed golf drivers, finding the perfect balance between quality and availability...

A number of different golf drivers in a grid system
(Image credit: Future)

Best Left-Handed Golf Drivers

One of the most annoying things about being a left-handed golfer is equipment availability. In recent years, manufacturers have made great strides to cater for the increasing number of left-handed players who are playing the sport. Right-handed golfers still have it much easier when looking to pick up one of the best golf drivers, but there is good news for lefties, as you'll now find that pretty much every brand out there has left-handed configurations for some of their top-performing clubs. 

Going through the custom-fitting process with your local pro or retailer can be a great way to sample some of the best left-handed options out there right now. But in this guide, we'll be walking you through some of our favorite and most readily available left-handed drivers on the market right now. We must note that, when testing these models, they were tested in right-handed spec, but all are available in left-handed options.

Finally, if you're after a more specific type of driver, check out our guides on the best drivers for slicers or best drivers for beginners for an even wider range of options. Also, if you're a left-hander and are struggling to find other clubs, check out our best left-handed putters guide too. 

The Quick List

Best Left Handed Golf Drivers

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TaylorMade Qi10 Driver

Photo of Taylormade Qi10 Driver

(Image credit: Future)

Specifications

Lofts: 9.0°, 10.5°, 12°
Adjustable Hosel: Yes
Stock Shafts: 2 options (Fujikura Ventus TR Blue 5 & Mitsubishi Diamana T+ 60)
Left Handed Option: 9.0° & 10.5°

Reasons to buy

+
New rounded head shape is excellent
+
Extremely forgiving at this spin level
+
Will appeal to a broad spectrum

Reasons to avoid

-
Only loft adjustability - no moveable weights

Sitting in the middle of the Qi10 range in terms of its spin and forgiveness levels, in theory the Qi10 will appeal to the broadest range of players. One thing that is for certain is that the tech story is pretty simple; TaylorMade has aimed to maximize the MOI without compromising ball speed.

Beginning with the performance; there were notable improvements over its predecessor, the Stealth 2, and we found the dispersion numbers to be tight. What's more, because of the low spin numbers, the Qi10 had a lovely mid-high flight as well as a penetrating ball flight that was super forgiving on off-centre strikes.

It's in the looks department where the biggest changes have been made, with a more subtle and less garish navy color introduced to the face of the Qi10. Along with the color change, TaylorMade has introduced a more rounded shape that will appeal to a wide range of golfers, whilst small touches, like an unobtrusive white accent line, only add to the premium aesthetics. 

Ping G430 Max 10K Driver

The sole of the Ping G430 Max 10K Driver on a green background

(Image credit: Future)

Specifications

Lofts: 9.0°, 10.5°, 12°
Adjustable Hosel: Yes
Stock Shafts: Multiple options
Left Handed Option: Available in all lofts

Reasons to buy

+
Exceptional stability and forgiveness
+
Very tight dispersion
+
Powerful feel and ball speed

Reasons to avoid

-
The stretched out footprint may not appeal to all

The G430 range ranks amongst the best Ping drivers money can buy and, arguably, the best model is the Max 10K, which scored five stars out five in our review. The reason for the perfect score? Well, it combines exceptional stability and forgiveness with extremely tight dispersion, whilst the powerful feel and ball speed is just the icing on the cake.

Before moving to the performance, the G430 Max 10K has a slightly larger footprint but, overall, the aesthetic blends cohesively with the rest of the G430 family, which includes the G430 LST driver and G430 Max driver. We must also add that the Max 10K has a fixed back weight and a Carbonfly wrap on the crown.

It's the performance where this model excels, with the most impressive aspect being how Ping's engineers have created such a stable and forgiving head that provides low spin numbers. In testing, our user noticed that mis-hits barely dropped more than 2mph, which easily puts the 10K amongst the most forgiving drivers. Such was the performance, it was almost impossible to find any faults with this club

Titleist TSR2 Driver

The Titleist TSR2 Driver

(Image credit: Future)

Specifications

Lofts: 8°, 9°, 10° & 12°
Adjustable Hosel: Yes
Stock Shafts: HZRDUS RED CB (6 other options available)
Left Handed Option: 8º, 9°, 10° & 11°

Reasons to buy

+
Impressively long
+
Consistent flight and distance
+
Aspirational aesthetics are classic and confidence-inspiring

Reasons to avoid

-
Not a huge upgrade over the previous generation

The TSR2 driver continues the classic design and feel found on many of the best Titleist golf drivers. Firstly, it is sleek and stealthy and boasts a glossy finish that'll pack in plenty of shelf appeal. Visually, it's not a massive upgrade on the TSi3 driver, but is a great option for any leftie, especially as the range of lofts feature from 8º to 11º.

Ultimately, this club is designed for speed, with the 'S' in TSR standing for 'Speed'. The brand have focused their attentions on making this a very fast-feeling club and, in testing, we noticed the powerful feel off the tee. The main reason for this is due to the improved work on the aerodynamics on the head design, as well as the new multi-plateau variable thickness face design. 

Flight-wise, the shots we hit flew nicely through the air and had a lot of playability, even when we struck the ball pretty poorly. Finally, the distance and usability on offer here makes this one of the best drivers on the market.

Callaway Paradym Ai Smoke Max Driver

The sole of the Callaway Paradym Ai Smoke Driver

(Image credit: Future)

Specifications

Lofts: 9°, 10.5°, 12°
Adjustable Hosel: Yes
Stock Shaft: 2 options (MCA Tensei Blue, Project X Cypher)
Left Handed Option: Available in all lofts

Reasons to buy

+
Great range of CG adjustability
+
Love the rounded head shape
+
Surprisingly low spin rate

Reasons to avoid

-
Very close in performance to the Triple Diamond model

Like the Qi10, the standard Paradym Ai Smoke Max sits between the low-spin, tour-influenced Ai Smoke Triple Diamond driver and the spinnier, draw-biased Max D driver. This means that it should suit a wider range of player, hence why we have included it in our left-handed guide.

Aesthetically, there is a lot to like about the Ai Smoke and, in terms of tech, Callaway's tag line with this product is ‘Sweeter From Every Spot’. Using swing dynamics from reals golfers, their engineers have created a bigger effective hitting area by advancing its Ai Smart Face technology. These swing dynamics include swing speed, club delivery, and face orientation just prior to impact. 

Performance-wise, the forgiveness was the main standout, with the feedback excellent across the whole face. Along with the feedback, the ball speed remained consistent from a wide range of areas and, when it came to feel, it was very lively but not harsh, something which impressed us in the original Paradym.

Cobra Darkspeed X Driver

Photo of the Cobra Darkspeed X driver

(Image credit: Future)

Specifications

Lofts: 9°, 10.5° and 12°
Adjustable Hosel: Yes
Stock Shaft: 5 options (Project X HZRDUS Red CB, UST LIN-Q M40X Red 5, UST LIN-Q M40X Blue 6, MCA Kai'li Blue 60, and UST LIN-Q M40X White 6)
Left Handed Option: 9° (Custom Only) and 10.5° Not in 12°

Reasons to buy

+
Stunning aesthetic
+
High levels of forgiveness
+
Will suit a wide range of players

Reasons to avoid

-
Mostly cosmetic improvements over last year's Aerojet

Given the name Darkspeed, it's only right we begin with the looks, which feature an all matte black profile that provides a seriously sophisticated appearance. We really liked how minimalist it was and, at address, this translated once again, as the neat and tidy looks provided a clean aesthetic when behind the ball. Visually, Cobra has created a 'less is very much more' feeling and we're fully on board. 

Performance-wise, the X produced the numbers we were looking for, with launch and spin sitting around the ideal target. Thanks to the high ball speed, we also saw a really neutral ball flight that had no real curvature bias. We must mention that, although the feel and sound were similar to that of its predecessor, the Aerojet, that didn't matter given that both are amongst some of the best Cobra drivers available right now.

From a tech point of view, it would be a lie to say that the Darkspeed X is a significant leap forward from the Aerojet, but Cobra have done an excellent job of refining their offering, with the Darkspeed X providing a premium driver that is significantly cheaper than its rivals.

PXG Black Ops Driver

A picture of the sole of the PXG 0311 Black Ops Driver

(Image credit: Future)

Specifications

Lofts: 8º, 9º, 10.5º & 12º
Adjustable Hosel: Yes
Stock Shaft: Multiple options
Left Handed Option: 9°, 10.5° & 12°

Reasons to buy

+
Excellent modern visual
+
The sound and feel are excellent
+
Really good all-rounder

Reasons to avoid

-
A little light on ball speed versus some competitors

In testing, when we sat the Black Ops driver down behind the ball, we were greeted with a fairly busy aesthetic, but one that does feel conducive to lining the ball up. Aesthetically, there is a gloss finish on the carbon crown and, like the Qi10, it has a rounded head that is confidence-inspiring when at address. 

From a technology point of view, the two main targeted areas - as normal - seem to be distance and forgiveness. PXG feels it has addressed the distance element through a titanium alloy face that it is referring to as AMF Technology. It claims that the higher strength and flexibility increases face deflection and produces a higher launch and lower spin. In testing, that appeared to be the case but, it's worth noting, that we found the distance to be slightly less than other models in this category.

Overall though, we did like the Black Ops an awful lot. The three adjustable weights on the sole of the club helped dial in launch conditions precisely and the flight and stability were really impressive. Lastly, along with the premium looks and solid acoustics, this is a driver that will help many with their game.

Mizuno ST-Max 230 Driver

Photo of the Mizuno ST-Max 230 driver

(Image credit: Future)

Specifications

Lofts: 9.5°, 10.5°, 12°
Adjustable Hosel: Yes
Stock Shaft: Aldila Ascent Red 50
Left Handed Option: Available in 9.5°

Reasons to buy

+
Classy looking clubhead
+
Nicely subdued feel at impact
+
Very easy to launch

Reasons to avoid

-
Higher spin profile may limit appeal

The Mizuno ST-Max 230 driver promises to be Mizuno’s most stable driver ever, with Mizuno's engineers lowering the profile of the ST-Max head to accommodate spreading and increasing the overall footprint of the driver. This has allowed Mizuno to add weight in more extreme locations to increase that all important MOI number.

What we particularly liked about the ST-Max 230 are the looks, which we thought were extremely premium. Mizuno does seem to have the knack when it comes to creating great looking driver heads and, when down behind the ball, the larger profile is certainly evident, something which many will absolutely adore.

In terms of performance, the impact feel is more subtle than some of the other most forgiving drivers on the market and the audio follows suit. Overall though, the high amounts of forgiveness, MOI and stability make this a very appealing option but, be warned, it only features in 9.5° in the left-handed category.

Srixon ZX5 Mk II Driver

Srixon ZX5 Driver MK II and its silver and black clubhead held aloft on the golf course

(Image credit: Future)

Specifications

Lofts: 9° & 10.5°
Adjustable Hosel: Yes
Stock Shafts: Project X HZRDUS Smoke Red RDX 50 (Multiple options available)
Left Handed Option: Available in all lofts

Reasons to buy

+
Simple design belies tech in head
+
Sounds better than previous model

Reasons to avoid

-
Limited weight adjustability

The ZX5 Mk II driver is an impressive release from Srixon and, compared to its predecessor, the Srixon ZX5, the Mk II version is one of the best Srixon drivers around. It features an all-titanium head construction instead of a carbon crown, with the weight saved being used to help launch the ball off the tee.

In testing, we felt that the ZX5 Mk II could fall under one of the best high handicap drivers, with Srixon also claiming the titanium on the club helps to improve the energy transfer on to the golf ball. Ultimately, it's hard not to agree with the brand as we thought the sound and feel from the ZX5 Mk II was simply excellent. In our testing sessions, the variable face thickness pattern helped us add more speed onto each shot and the trailing edge is also a little higher here, to help keep the club's center of gravity in the right position. 

Along with helping high handicappers, this could be classed as one of the best drivers for slicers as the slight draw bias in the head was subtle enough to keep our shots flying pretty straight. One other thing to note here is how good this club will be for those who struggle to generate a lot of power on each shot, given the lightweight nature of this driver.

Wilson Dynapower Carbon Driver

Wilson Dynapwr driver and its grey and red clubhead on the golf course

(Image credit: Future)

Specifications

Lofts: Carbon head - 9˚, 10.5˚ & 12˚ Titanium head - 9˚, 10.5˚ & 13˚
Adjustable Hosel : Yes
Stock Shafts: Carbon head - Fujkura Ventus Blue - Titanium head - Project X HZRDUS Smoke Red RDX
Left Handed Option: Available in all lofts

Reasons to buy

+
Premium looks
+
Dense, satisfying feel at impact
+
Stable and forgiving off-center

Reasons to avoid

-
Initial ball speed fell short of 2023 marquee launches
-
Hosel settings aren't visible when secured

The Dynapower Carbon driver is a highly advanced golf club that delivers bags of shelf appeal thanks to its stunning clubhead design. It is one of the best Wilson golf clubs on the market due to the fact that it is one of their most adjustable drivers. What's more, it's available in both Carbon and Titanium head options.

When we set the Dynapower behind the ball, we instantly noticed that it was very traditional and inviting at address. When struck, it also produced a neutral to slight fade shot shape bias that will certainly help those who have a tendency to hook the ball off the tee. Also, the off-centre forgiveness was more than ample and we didn't see big drops in ball speeds when we didn't strike the ball out the centre. 

There really is a lot to like about the driver and it's comfortably among the best golf drivers on the market right now. One thing we would recommend though is to get fitted for the Dynapower so that you will be able to get the maximum amount of performance from it.

How we test the best left handed drivers

When it comes to product testing, our reviews and buyers' guides are built upon a rigorous testing procedure as well as the knowledge and experience of our test team. Getting into specifics for left-handed drivers, we regularly attend product launches and club release events to speak to manufacturers to understand more about the technology that goes into each product. We then get our hands on the clubs, typically hitting them indoors first, and use some of the best launch monitors with premium golf balls to test the products out. 

We then put them to the test outdoors on the range, before putting them through their paces on the course in a variety of conditions that will give us an understanding of how each club performs in real-life conditions. Ultimately, we aim to be as insightful and honest as possible in our reviews so it is important to acknowledge that no manufacturer can buy a good review. This is because our team tells it how it is. We want to try and find the best golf clubs on the market and give you some insight on them, which requires being thorough and transparent. 

What to consider when buying a left handed golf driver

As left-handed golf clubs are generally harder to come by, you'll want to spend a bit of time looking for the driver that best suits you. Whether you're an experienced golfer and have a faster swing or are looking for something a little more forgiving to get rid of your slice, we recommend testing each product first before you buy it. During your testing and fitting process, there are several things you need to keep an eye out for to ensure that you get the best left-handed driver for your abilities. For that reason, we've set out five key considerations below that you need to make when buying your next left-handed driver. 

1. Loft

The first thing to think about is the loft of your club. Drivers generally tend to come in lofts from 8.5º to around 13º. Now, depending on your abilities as a golfer, how fast you swing the club and how much power you generate through impact, you're going to want to think very carefully about the loft of the club you're buying. 

Generally, players with lower club swing speed should opt for higher lofted drivers, from 11º to 14º. This is because if they play with a lower lofted driver, they will struggle to smash through the golf ball and get enough power on the shot to lift the ball into the air. For that reason, having a few extra degrees of loft on the club can help you achieve better ball flights, particularly if you're not the type of golfer who can generate a lot of speed through the ball. 

Dissimilarly, if you know you can get a lot of power off the tee, you should look to play with a lower lofted driver. This is because your higher clubhead speeds will add more power on the golf ball, enabling you to generate much better ball flights with a lower lofted driver. Most players on the PGA Tours can generate those top clubhead speeds and for that reason, they typically tend to play with drivers between 8.5º and 10º in loft. 

2. Forgiveness

Even if you're the best golfer in the world, forgiveness is something we should all think about when buying our next driver. Nobody is perfect and you're not always going to be able to hit a perfect golf shot every time you address the ball, especially if you're a beginner or a high handicap golfer. So for that reason, having a driver with a little bit of forgiveness can really help to reduce the chances of you hitting a duffed shot. But what actually makes a driver so forgiving? 

Well, there are several features to look out for when looking for a forgiving driver. The first, and perhaps most important, is the size of the sweet spot on the clubface. Big sweet spots ensure that off-center shots still travel long distances and are less likely to drop out of the air or slice than clubs with smaller sweet spots. That can also be helped if your club has a high Moment of Inertia (MOI). MOI means how much a clubhead turns on impact, and the lower the MOI of your club, the more fluid and true your golf shot will be. The last thing to consider is the weight distribution of the club. Ideally, you'd like the center of gravity of the club head to be centered towards the back of the club. This helps to keep the face open and square on impact and promotes a strong ball flight. 

3. Adjustability

Most models these days come with a degree of adjustability, whether it be loft, weight movement, shaft and so on. Adjustability can be a useful feature for players who want to adapt their swing for different conditions. Perhaps you want to hit a low draw through the wind or want to smash a high cut on a hot day. It can also be great for improving the forgiveness of the club, by altering the weight distribution of the club head. Have a think about how important adjustability is to you because you can change the characteristics of a club if you want to. Alternatively, you can just keep things simple with other models as well.

4. Shaft flex

Another important point to mention is the flex of the shaft on the golf club. Golf club shafts tend come in five flex categories; extra-stiff (X), stiff (S), regular (R), senior (A) and ladies (L). It's important to head down to the range and try out each type of shaft to get a better understanding of which flex is right for you. Similar to driver lofts, golfers who can generate a lot of clubhead speed should opt to play with a stiffer shaft. That is because their ability to rip the club through the air means they need a slightly stiffer shaft to get a good contact on the ball. Meanwhile, those who generate less power through the swing may want to choose a club that has a little more flex and allows them to generate speed through the whip of the golf club onto the ball. 

5. Looks

Looking good on the first tee inspires confidence to hit bombs down the center of the fairway and if you've got a driver you like the look of, then you're more likely to send your golf ball rather than slice it. Looks aren't everything in golf, but if you're going to fork out for a brand new driver, getting one that looks the business is vitally important. 

For more advice on picking out your next driver head over to our guides on most forgiving drivers, best drivers for slices and the best drivers for mid-handicappers.

FAQs

What loft driver do Tour Professionals use?

As professional golfers are generally able to generate high swing speeds, they tend to use lower lofted drivers. This means they typically use drivers that are around 8.5º-10º in loft.

Does driver shaft flex make a difference?

Yes, driver shaft flex is one of the most important factors to consider when picking a new driver. Golfers who have slower swing speeds will struggle to use drivers that have stiff shafts and are better off using a club with a lot of flex in it to help them generate more speed through impact. Meanwhile, golfers who are able to generate high ball speeds should look to use stiffer shafts, as that will allow them to rip through their shot and strike the ball longer.

Are there any left-handed professional golfers?

Yes there are many left-handers playing on the professional tours. The most notable of them is Phil Mickelson who, thanks to his left-handed swing, earned himself the name Leftie over the years. Bubba Watson is also another of the most notable left-handers, as well as Mike Weir, Brian Harman, Garrick Higgo and Robert MacIntyre.