Best Callaway Irons 2022

Our guide to the best Callaway irons on the market right now, suitable for all abilities from the tour pro to the high handicapper

Best Callaway Irons
(Image credit: Future)

Best Callaway Irons

As one of the biggest brands in golf, and a company with a huge presence amongst professional golf, Callaway has become renowned for high-quality golf equipment for decades. Every club you can think of gets made by the manufacturer and every level of golfer is catered for as well, as shown by the current iron range.

VIDEO: Joel Tadman runs through the Callaway 2022 iron range

Because of this, and because of how important it is to get the best golf irons (opens in new tab) for you, there is no excuse these days for you to use an iron that makes the game more difficult for yourself. Iron play is crucial to good scoring and having the correct irons set-up to suit your game will help you find greater consistency. A good set will also give you confidence from an aesthetic and distance-control perspective too.

Acknowledging this, Callaway is most definitely a brand to consider if you are in the market for a new set of irons, and as such below we have taken a look at the best Callaway irons in the current range. Alternatively if Callaway is not for you, check out our guides on the best Titleist irons (opens in new tab), best Mizuno irons (opens in new tab), best Ping irons (opens in new tab) or the best TaylorMade irons too.

Callaway Apex 21 iron

(Image credit: Future)
An iron aimed at the club golfer seeking a blend of distance, feel and control

Reasons to buy

+
Appealing balance of feel and distance
+
Stunning looks

Reasons to avoid

-
Not much difference between this and DCB model

Some of the best Callaway irons ever made are models that cover a wide range of abilities, and this Apex design does just that. Not only will it deliver for those who want distance and forgiveness, but it also delivers for those who want more feel and feedback too.

There are a number of alterations to the Apex 19's to talk about here. For example the Apex 21 design is the first forged iron with a Flash Face Cup designed with Artificial Intelligence for faster ball speeds. Second it has a new Tungsten Energy Core which is five times heavier than the tungsten weight in the Apex 19 irons to promote higher and more consistent launch and spin.

Finally, like the other models below, the Apex has been forged from 1025 carbon steel for soft feel which really differentiates this iron from most. In testing, we found the Apex to be soft in feel yet powerful, producing good distance. This is a club that really rewards good ball-striking and it will suit aspiring players looking for a blend of power and feel.

- Read our full Callaway Apex Irons Review (opens in new tab)

Callaway Rogue ST Pro ironEditors Choice 2022

(Image credit: Future)
A compact, hollow distance iron that boasts improved feel and consistency

Reasons to buy

+
Soft yet powerful feel
+
Surprisingly forgiving for its size

Reasons to avoid

-
Mirror chrome finish will split opinion

The Rogue ST Pro is a beautiful hollow body iron with slightly more traditional lofts than the other Rogue ST models in a compact, players shape. It’s the most workable model in the range with a thin top-line and reduced offset.

It has Callaway’s new A.I. Face Optimization unique for each club in the set to create spin rate consistency across the face. Precision weighting features up to 48g of high-density tungsten, a 188 percent increase over Mavrik, for improved launch conditions and maximized speed across the face. The urethane microspheres have also been pushed further up the face to the 6th groove to enhance sound and deliver pure feel while maintaining fast ball speeds.

With a 7-iron loft of 30.5°, this iron is clearly still built to offer good distance but in a refined, elegant manner that will please the low handicapper. The size is appealing without being clunky and we really enjoyed the ball striking experience on offer. The sound is quiet but the feel is powerful, it’s a combination that delivers distance without any harsh acoustics you sometimes get from game improvement irons. For our money, it’s the best all-round model within the Rogue ST range.

Callaway Apex DCB iron

(Image credit: Future)
The Apex distance iron for low swing speed golfers that want to play an Apex club

Reasons to buy

+
Most forgiving of the Apex irons
+
Improved sound and feel

Reasons to avoid

-
Minimal difference between DCB and standard Apex

The first new Apex iron to talk about is the DCB, a model suited to distance-orientated players who don't want to sacrifice the look and feel of a forged club. Forgiveness comes from the deep cavity back design and the 50 grams of tungsten in the long and mid-irons helps promote better launch throughout the set. Once again the urethane microspheres are present to improve the sound which can be a big issue sometimes when talking about distance or game-improvement irons.

Overall, the lure of the extra distance and forgiveness in the Apex DCB, and indeed the Apex, in a package that still looks appealing and feels good, will, we think, make the two models above in particular a very popular choice.

- Read our full Callaway Apex DCB Irons Review (opens in new tab)

Callaway Rogue ST Max iron

(Image credit: Howard Boylan)
Callaway's longest iron of 2022

Reasons to buy

+
Explosive feel
+
Very forgiving off center

Reasons to avoid

-
Strong lofts means shots come in hot into greens

The Rogue ST Max irons have the strongest lofts in the new family, suited to a wide range of players looking for speed and distance with forgiveness. Added distance also comes from the combination of High Strength 450 steel with the A.I. designed Flash Face Cup optimised for speed, spin, launch and descent angle. There is also a tungsten weight port that is significantly heavier than prior ranges that allows for precise CG location for optimal launch throughout the set.

Replacing Mavrik was never going to be an easy task but the Rogue ST Max looks to offer market-leading distance in a visually-appealing package for the mid-to-high handicapper. For golfers that want maximum assistance, this is the iron to go for - it feels supremely easy to hit and the strong lofts are offset by the impressive launch and ball speed, suiting the slower swing speed that struggles to achieve decent carry distance.

- Read our full Callaway Rogue ST Max iron review

Callaway Apex TCB Iron Review new

(Image credit: Future)
Popular on tour and among elite amateurs

Reasons to buy

+
Tour validated performance
+
Lots of specifications to fine tune set

Reasons to avoid

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Limited availability

Another brand new model in the Apex range for 2021 is the TCB. An iron that moves towards the better player end of the spectrum, this cavity-back design has already been seen on Tour in a number of high-profile bags like Jon Rahm and Xander Schauffele.

The iron has been engineered for a soft forged feel that offers excellent feedback, whilst also giving the player control over shot shape. It has a similar footprint than the X-Forged iron from 2018 but, like the other Apex irons in this list, is using a 1025 Forged Hollow Body Construction. It also has a tuned face plate and MIM tungsten weighting for greater performance.

We should also mention the fine-tuning that can be done when buying these irons as you can have an input into the specification package in terms of lofts, bounces, blade lengths, shafts and grips. It is a very Tour-player like experience.

- Read our full Callaway Apex TCB Iron review

Callaway Apex Pro 21 iron

(Image credit: Future)

Reasons to buy

+
More workability than Apex
+
Soft feel

Reasons to avoid

-
A cleaner looking iron would be preferable

The Apex Pro 21 model which is for those who want a slightly more compact profile at address. It has the same A.I.-designed Flash Face Cup and urethane microspheres present in other Apex models, but in an all-new forged 1025 hollow body construction. Additionally Callaway has added a Tungsten Energy Core to the Pro for the first time which is to improve launch characteristics and forgiveness.

As we progressed through the Apex range during testing, we found the Apex Pro iron easier to manipulate than the standard Apex. It’s great for shot shaping, and although not as long, it produced a solid and penetrating ball flight. The look down behind the ball will clearly suit those who strike the ball well quite often, but want a little bit of extra forgiveness compared to the Apex MB.

- Read our full Callaway Apex Pro Irons Review (opens in new tab)

Callaway Rogue ST Max OS iron

(Image credit: Howard Boylan)
Callaway's most forgiving iron of 2022

Reasons to buy

+
Produces a towering ball flight
+
Comes in a Lite version

Reasons to avoid

-
Significant offset won't suit everyone's eye

The Rogue ST Max OS irons are slightly larger than the Rogue ST Max iron and offers higher launch, wider soles and enhanced offset in a very forgiving design for mid-to-high handicap golfers.They also come in a Lite version for seniors and lady golfers with a graphite shaft to help maximise swing speed. 

The lofts aren’t quite as strong as on the Rogue ST Max, which is an unusual quirk within the Rogue ST iron range but if you are looking for a blend of high levels of distance and forgiveness in a confidence-inspiring package, then the Rogue ST Max OS iron is well worth trying this year.

- Read our full Callaway Rogue ST Max OS iron review

Callaway Apex MB iron

(Image credit: Future)
A muscleback aimed at the very best ball strikers

Reasons to buy

+
Great looks
+
Workability and feel

Reasons to avoid

-
Only for the best ball-strikers

The Apex MB is the most blade-like of the 2021 Apex range of irons from Callaway. It has a classic-looking design with a tin topline and minimal offset. As such it is clearly the iron destined for the Tour. As you would expect then it is aimed at better players who seek to have the most control over ball flight, and shot shape. Feel is also an important factor for the players that would use this iron, and that is delivered thanks to the 1025 carbon steel which feels super soft and gives the player good feedback. 

Precision grooves are designed to promote the high level of control and consistent spin as well as reducing fliers from the rough to deliver even more control. A new weight in the centre of the clubhead allows swing weights to be precisely dialled in without sacrificing performance. Given the testing we put this iron through, we found the only negative to be that only the finest ball-strikers will be able to use them consistently.

- Read our full Callaway Apex MB Irons Review (opens in new tab)

Callaway Mavrik iron

(Image credit: Future)
Callaway's outgoing game improvement iron you might be able to pick up at a reduced price

Reasons to buy

+
Forgiving
+
Good distance

Reasons to avoid

-
Set makeup requires some fine-tuning

There’s some complex technology contained within the Callaway Mavrik Iron. The irons feature Flash Faces designed by a super-computer. The result is a sophisticated face architecture for every loft, delivering a significant boost in ball speed and optimised spin.

In the long irons, the faces are designed for launch and speed, while in the mid-irons the faces are engineered for a combination of speed and spin consistency. The short irons have a face construction designed to optimise precision for shot-making. Tungsten weights have been precisely positioned to deliver the best possible launch and trajectory.

In testing, we found the standard Mavrik Iron to be the longest of the three in the range – see Mavrik Max and Mavrik Pro below. If you’re looking to gain maximum distance from iron shots, this super-forgiving set could be the way to go.

- Read our full Callaway Mavrik Irons Review

Best Callaway Irons

A premium, tech-packed game improvement iron with genuine wow factor

Reasons to buy

+
Very fast off the face
+
 Stunning looks

Reasons to avoid

-
Low launch might concern slower swingers

Forged from 1025 carbon steel and constructed with a dynamic suspended tungsten core in each head, these highly engineered irons are lightweight, easy to swing and smooth through impact.

Distance is generated in the longer irons by the 360 Face Cup that promotes high ball speeds across the face, while Callaway’s urethane microspheres provide a soft feel. These are over one million tiny air pockets that absorb unwanted vibration without slowing the face.

With a variable face thickness pattern, the faces of the Epic irons are noticeably fast but also consistent – no rogue long shots. The Epic Forged irons look fantastic with a luxurious platinum chrome sheen finish. Featuring strong lofts, the ball flight is on the low side, but we found them a joy to hit in testing - they are seriously fast and one of the most forgiving irons (opens in new tab) on the market.

- Read our full Callaway Epic Forged Irons Review

Callaway B21 iron

(Image credit: Future)
A forgiving, draw-biased iron for high handicap golfers with a slice

Reasons to buy

+
Looks inviting to hit
+
Strong, high draw bias trajectory

Reasons to avoid

-
Large profile may put some off

The Callaway Big Bertha B21 irons are the first Big Bertha irons to be designed using Artificial Intelligence. The irons feature a generous offset, wide soles and a thick topline to inspire confidence.

Flash face technology delivers high ball speeds and a strong ball flight and tungsten toe weighting moves the centre of gravity to the middle of the score-lines for extra forgiveness. Callaway’s urethane microspheres provide a soft feel. These are over one million tiny air pockets that absorb unwanted vibration without slowing the face.

Overall, after testing, we thought the Big Bertha B21 iron to be ideal for high-handicap golfers who struggle with launch and strike. There is a good deal of technology to help you get the ball up with more speed, while the feel off the face is also pleasing on the senses.

- Read our full Callaway Big Bertha B21 Irons Review

FAQs

Which Callaway iron is the best?

This is very much player dependent as what iron is best for a low handicapper will be different to the best Callaway iron for a high handicapper. The Callaway Apex 21 iron arguably has the broadest appeal because of the distance, forgiveness and sleek looks on offer followed by the new Callaway Rogue ST Pro iron.

Which Callaway irons are the most forgiving?

The two most forgiving irons in the Callaway iron range for this year are the Apex DCB and the Rogue ST Max OS. Both have large chassis to provide maximum stability and consistency of ball speed across the face. The Big Bertha B21 iron is also very user friendly, with additional offset to increase the draw bias for golfers that struggle with a slice.

How We Test Callaway Irons

Our insights into the performance of golf irons is built upon a comprehensive testing process combined with the knowledge and expertise of the Golf Monthly test team, headed up by technical editor Joel Tadman. As far as the specific procedure goes, before testing, the team will usually attend product launches and meet with the manufacturer's R&D experts to understand the new technology.

When it comes to testing, we often head indoors first to try the irons in a controlled environment. This usually takes place on an indoor simulator using a premium, reputable launch monitor with premium balls. Our outside testing normally takes place at West Hill Golf Club, a course with top-notch practice facilities, both on the range and on course.

We think it is vitally important to do both and continue to test the irons so they have been comprehensively put to the test in different conditions. It should also be mentioned that manufacturers cannot pay for a good review and we make our conclusions from the testing and our experiences. This is because we strive to give the best reviews possible so you can get a greater understanding of the irons themselves.

Joel Tadman
Joel Tadman

Joel has worked in the golf industry for over 12 years covering both instruction and more recently equipment. He now oversees all product content here at Golf Monthly, managing a team of talented and passionate writers and presenters in delivering the most thorough and accurate reviews, buying advice, comparisons and deals to help the reader find exactly what they are looking for. So whether it's the latest driver, irons, putter or laser rangefinder, Joel has his finger on the pulse keeping up to date with the latest releases in golf. He is also responsible for all content on irons and golf tech, including distance measuring devices and launch monitors.


During these enjoyable years he has had some money-can't-buy experiences, like interviewing Tiger Woods and Rory McIlroy one-on-one and covering the 2010 Ryder Cup at Celtic Manor. 


One of his career highlights came when covering the 2012 Masters he got to play the sacred Augusta National course on the Monday after the tournament concluded, shooting a respectable 87 with just one par and four birdies. To date, his best ever round of golf is a 5-under 67 back in 2011. He currently plays his golf at Burghley Park Golf Club in Stamford, Lincs, with a handicap index of 4.7.


Joel's current What's In The Bag? 

Driver: Titleist TSi3, 9° 

Fairway wood: Titleist TSi3, 15° 

Hybrid: Titleist TSi2, 18° 

Irons: TaylorMade P770, 4-PW 

Wedges: Titleist Vokey SM8, 50°, 54° and a Titleist Vokey SM9 60° lob wedge 

Putter: Evnroll ER2V 

Ball: 2021 Titleist Pro V1x

With contributions from