Best Mizuno Irons 2022

Your ultimate guide to the best Mizuno irons on the market

best mizuno irons
(Image credit: Future)

Best Mizuno Irons

Mizuno is a company renowned for legendary craftsmanship across a variety of sports, and the golf equipment it produces is not immune from this. Within the golf market, Mizuno has made some of the best golf irons (opens in new tab) for decades, regularly winning tournaments out on Tour, and building a reputation for soft-feeling, great-looking pieces of equipment. There is a reason the phrase, 'nothing feels like a Mizuno' is so synonymous with its irons.

The Japanese company is famed for its forging process, carried out at its facility in Hiroshima. Although Mizuno is best known for producing classic, players’ irons, offering superb levels of feel and workability, they also produce models to suit golfers with higher handicaps – irons delivering impressive distance and also offering high levels of forgiveness.

Bearing that in mind below we have taken a look at some of the best Mizuno irons in the current range - models that cover a wide range of abilities. However if Mizuno is not for you, check out our guides on the best Titleist irons (opens in new tab)best Callaway irons (opens in new tab)best Ping irons (opens in new tab) or the best TaylorMade irons (opens in new tab) too. 

Whatever you are looking for, we have got you covered.

Best Mizuno Irons

Mizuno jpx 921 forged iron, mizuno golf iron, mid-handicap iron

(Image credit: Future)

Reasons to buy

+
Thin face and fast ball speeds
+
Low and deep centre of gravity

Reasons to avoid

-
Not as easily workable as Tour option

The JPX921 Forged iron integrates the power of Chromoly into a full body forged iron for the very first time. Initially applied in Mizuno's Hot Metal irons - Chromoly has made the cross over to Mizuno's forgings with excellent results. Testing shows the fastest ball speeds Mizuno has ever produced from a fully forged iron.

Grain Flow Forged HD in Mizuno’s  facility in Hiroshima Japan, the JPX921 Forged irons offer an identifiable and classic Mizuno feel. The integration of Chromoly 4120 allows for a clubface up to 0.5mm thinner which delivers the fastest ball speeds Mizuno has ever produced from a full body Forged iron.

Additional perimeter weighting with toe bias creates a Stability Frame to maximise results from off-centre strikes, while a 6.4% wider CNC back milled slot further increases stability. Despite this, the JPX921 Forged irons offer a sleeker, compact profile – a shorter blade length throughout, a beveled training edge and reduced offset. The feel is that of a traditional forged iron as the JPX921 Forged gets noticeably sleeker through the set.

Given this incredible performance and yet sleek design, the JPX 921 Forged is one of the best compact mid-handicap irons (opens in new tab) money can buy at the moment.

Mizuno Pro 225 iron reviewEditors Choice 2022

(Image credit: Future)

Reasons to buy

+
Significantly improvement over prior model
+
Visually appealing from all angles
+
Fast and forgiving

Reasons to avoid

-
Some may want to look down on a larger head

As underwhelming as the previous version of this club was, Mizuno has really stepped up the performance with Pro 225 iron. It feels infinitely hotter off the face and will really suit those mid-to-low handicappers that want to play a slim, players-looking iron without giving up distance.

The hollow head provides the spring in the step of this club while tungsten weighting provides the off-centre stability and it does it from a chassis that looks like a blade and sits compactly behind the ball. Manufacturers are able to cram in an awful lot of forgiveness into small iron heads these days and the Mizuno Pro 225 is arguably one of the very best examples.

- Read our full Mizuno Pro 225 iron review

Mizuno JPX921 Tour

(Image credit: Future)

Reasons to buy

+
Soft and pure feel
+
Tour shape

Reasons to avoid

-
Not as forgiving as other JPX921 models

These Tour inspired irons have been designed to provide precise distance control for the better player. The JPX921 Tour maintains its predecessor’s fusion of precision with stability from off-centre strikes.

Mizuno’s Stability Frame with toe bias weighting promotes a longer, straighter and more consistent ball flight while the pearl brush finish reduces glare. Grain Flow Forged from 1025E Pure Select Mild Carbon steel, the JPX921 Tour delivers an identifiable and classic Mizuno feel as per the JPX921 Forged.

The shorter irons feature a narrower sole for improved turf interaction while a thicker cavity pad throughout the set, evolving from Mizuno’s study of vibration patterns, produces a harmonic impact that can be felt for a fraction longer. Better players will enjoy the workability on offer with these irons.

Mizuno Pro 223 iron review

(Image credit: Future)

Reasons to buy

+
Appealing blend of feel and distance
+
Surprisingly playable given the compact size

Reasons to avoid

-
Limited gains over prior model

This iron could best be described as a more compact version of the JPX921 Forged (opens in new tab), especially in the short irons, appealing slightly more towards the better player that favours feel and workability over out and out distance.

Not only does this iron look fantastic from every angle, but it satisfies the demand for a blade-like club that provides a little more distance, especially off centre. Some better players might hit this iron further than they want to, which is where a fitting is key to dial in the lofts and shaft model to produce the optimum carry distances for you that won’t effect gapping at either end of the bag.

Left-handers will be pleased too as the Mizuno Pro 223 is available in a full set rather than just a blended set comprising all three models, as was available on the MP20.

- Read our full Mizuno Pro 223 iron review

Mizuno JPX921 Hot Metal iron

(Image credit: Future)

Reasons to buy

+
Longest in the range
+
Greater consistency from off-centre strikes

Reasons to avoid

-
Chunkiest model of the JPX912 range

The JPX921 Hot Metal is the longest iron in the JPX range, thanks to the use of Chromoly 4140M and a re-engineered Cortech face, now 0.2mm thinner across the centre point, creating faster ball speeds. These are assisted by a Seamless Cup Face featuring a variable thickness sole design that allows the leading edge to act as a hinge, generating more face flex.

Three additional sound ribs produce a more solid sensation at impact while extreme perimeter weighting and toe bias in Mizuno’s Stability Frame help to deliver greater consistency from off-centre strikes. As such these are some of the best distance irons (opens in new tab), and most forgiving irons (opens in new tab) anywhere in golf right now.

Mizuno JPX921 Hot Metal Pro iron

(Image credit: Future)

Reasons to buy

+
Fast ball speed
+
Compact looks

Reasons to avoid

-
Not quite as forgiving as Hot Metal model

The JPX921 Hot Metal Pro features the same technologies as the Hot Metal model above, in a slightly more compact package with less offset. As such there is little to separate the two models when it comes to distance and performance, but with the slightly more compact head, better players who strike the ball more consistently, and yet still want a little bit of help, may prefer the Pro to the standard model.

Once again during testing, the Stability Frame was particularly noticeable as it gave more than enough assistance on heel or toe strikes. Ball flight didn't appear to be effected too much and the launch assistance will benefit those players who swing the club a little slower.

Mizuno Pro 221 Iron Review

(Image credit: Future)

Reasons to buy

+
Exceptional feel
+
High levels of ball flight manipulation
+
More solid than the old MP20

Reasons to avoid

-
Not overly forgiving off center

It doesn’t get much more traditional than a Mizuno MP blade, rich in heritage and with the addition of the ‘Mizuno Pro’ scripting first used back in 1981 and reserved solely for use in Japan up until now. Given how it looks, you’d be forgiven for thinking that this iron is more about image and perception over performance.

But Mizuno, maker of some of the very best golf blade irons, is keen to dispel this myth - blades naturally aren’t packed full of features or technology, but the taller pad behind the hitting area and copper underlay beneath the chrome finish should enhance both feel and consistency.

The purist will enjoy everything about this iron. The way it looks, feels but also how it has a little more oomph behind it compared to most other blades we've tested, testament to the Grain Flow Forging process and the evolution of the head shape. All things being equal, from the sweetspot it's one of the most satisfying irons you could hit, but the target market remains relatively niche given the limited distance and forgiveness on offer.

- Read our full Mizuno Pro 221 iron review

How we test Mizuno irons

Our testing for golf irons is built upon a comprehensive process combined with the knowledge and expertise of the Golf Monthly test team. As far as the specific procedure goes, before testing, the team will usually attend product launches and meet with the manufacturer's R&D experts to understand the new technology.

When it comes to testing, we often head indoors first to try the irons in a controlled environment. This usually takes place on an indoor simulator at Foresight Sports, with premium balls and the GCQuad launch monitor. Our outside testing normally takes place at West Hill Golf Club, a course with top-notch practice facilities.

We think it is vitally important to do both and continue to test the irons so they have been comprehensively put to the test in different conditions. It should also be mentioned that manufacturers cannot pay for a good review and we make our conclusions from the testing and our experiences. This is because we strive to give the best reviews possible so you can get a greater understanding of the irons themselves.

FAQs

Are Mizuno irons the best?

Mizuno irons are widely regarded as some of the very best because of the feel they provide and the consistency of the distance on offer. The brand always has a wide choice available to suit different abilities, usually split into the technology-packed JPX series and the MP or Mizuno Pro series, which is more feel/looks orientated and aimed more at the lower handicapper.

Why do Mizuno irons feel so good?

Mizuno's Grain Flow Forged HD process is one of the most precise around, tightly packing the grains of the metal together for the ultimate ball striking experience. Mizuno is able to forge with additional materials, like Chromoly and Boron, to achieve stronger metals that can be forged into thinner faces and offer more speed.

Fergus is a golf obsessive and 1-handicapper. Growing up in the North East of Scotland, golf runs through his veins and it was concentrated by his time at St Andrews university studying history. He went on to earn a post graduate diploma from the London School of Journalism. Fergus has worked for Golf Monthly since 2004 and has written two books on the game; "Great Golf Debates" together with Jezz Ellwood of Golf Monthly and "The Ultimate Golf Book" together with Neil Tappin (also of Golf Monthly)... Fergus once shanked a ball from just over Granny Clark's Wynd on the 18th of the Old Course that struck the St Andrews Golf Club and rebounded into the Valley of Sin, from where he saved par. Who says there's no golfing god?