Best Callaway Hybrids 2022

Take a look at the best Callaway hybrids currently on the market

A selection of Callaway hybrids
(Image credit: Future)

Callaway has always been an innovator when it comes to metal woods, with the brand bringing us iconic lines like Big Bertha, Warbird and Steelhead. It was also one of the earliest adopters of golf hybrids, when, in the early ‘noughties’, it gave us the Heavenwood and Divine Nine; higher-lofted woods that could be swung and struck like irons.

Today, the golf hybrid is a mainstay in almost every golf bag, from weekend warriors to touring professionals. The reason is obvious, they’re so much easier to hit than long irons.

The best golf hybrid clubs (opens in new tab) are designed to help players hit better approach shots from long range; they're easier to launch, more effective from a range of lies and generally instil confidence at address.

It’s more common now to see hybrids in the bags of tour players as opposed to traditional 2 and 3 iron clubs. Not only do top players understand the forgiveness and flight benefits, they also recognise how well hybrids fill the distance gaps at the top end of their bags.

With hybrids available in lofts from 17° to 29°, there are plentiful of options to replace long and mid-irons and make the long game infinitely easier.

Callaway staff players in particular have a lot of choice on offer when it comes to the best Callaway hybrids, with the brand researching and developing technologies that promote forgiveness and ease of use, as well as stand out looks and shelf appeal that make them a popular choice with golfers of all ages and playing abilities.

Whether you're looking to give yourself a distance boost or find the most forgiving hybrids (opens in new tab), Callaway has a model that will suit your preferences.

Best Callaway Hybrids

callaway apex uwEditors Choice 2022

(Image credit: Golf Monthly)
Iconic Name

Specifications

Lofts: 17°, 19°, 21°

Reasons to buy

+
Can do the job of a higher lofted fairway wood and a strong hybrid
+
Longer than a five wood, easier to hit than a 2-iron or utility iron

Reasons to avoid

-
Looks are plain for such a high-tech club

A 2022 Editor's Choice (opens in new tab) pick, there is an awful lot to like about this Callaway Apex UW Hybrid, with the unbelievable performance making way for a gigantic amount of technology.

Sitting flush and square on the turf at address, it gives the user a lot of confidence. This was noticeable during testing where the dispersion was extremely accurate when compared with other hybrids, with shots being solidly grouped around the centre line with more misses going right than left.

Callaway states that the Apex UW delivers 17% tighter dispersion in testing and our launch monitor test results support that. Therefore, it is one of the best hybrids that money can buy.

Callaway Rogue ST MAX Hybrid

(Image credit: Matthew Moore)
Best for consistency

Specifications

Lofts: 18°, 20°, 23° (RH & LH), 26° (RH only)

Reasons to buy

+
Premium elegant looks
+
Larger more forgiving head is super easy to hit
+
One of the straightest, most accurate hybrids we’ve tested in 2022

Reasons to avoid

-
Draw-bias clubface may look closed to the eye of some players
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Non adjustable for loft

Callaway released the Rogue ST hybrid family for 2022 with a serious billing, calling it “our fastest family of hybrids ever.” There are four Callaway Rogue ST hybrids to choose from, with options to suit everyone from a scratch player to a high handicapper.

All the tour proven Callaway technology is built into the Rogue ST Max hybrid, including a revamped Jailbreak ST system that pushes the two ‘batwings’ further towards the perimeter of the face for a higher MOI, a more flexible face and better ball speeds.

This club delivered lots of the performance benefits you’ll want in a good hybrid. It flew with a powerful rainbow shaped flight and stopped quickly going into greens on long par 3 holes and tough par 4s.

Moving onto the looks and the matte black looks very premium. In terms of pure performance, it wasn’t the longest or fastest in the Rogue ST hybrid series but it was reassuringly straight with an excellent dispersion average, up there with the very best hybrids in our test. 

We loved how consistent and forgiving the ST Max was and, coupled with the great looks and Callaway’s reliability of performance, then it’s clear this hybrid would improve the play of a wide range of golfers.

Callaway Rogue Hybrid

(Image credit: Matthew Moore)
Best for workability

Specifications

Lofts: 18°, 20°, 23° (RH & LH)

Reasons to buy

+
Sleek stylish looks
+
Improved feel and workability
+
Ideal for straight hitters and players who love to fade it

Reasons to avoid

-
Average ball strikers could struggle with the shallow face profile compared to other Rogue ST hybrid models
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Not adjustable for loft

Callaway’s Rogue ST Pro hybrid is targeted at better players seeking strong distance and enhanced workability.

Designed with a shallow face, the ST Pro hybrid includes artificial intelligence (A.I), a computer programme that optimises Callaway’s Flash Face designs for the best possible launch, spin and ball speed.

Down at address, the ST Pro hybrid head resembles a compact fairway wood, which also includes a rounder toe and a premium looking matte black finish. The hybrid actually looks similar to that the Apex UW (utility wood), which earned five stars when we reviewed it.

We tested the 20° model and, with its low spin bias, strong shaft and shallower, hotter face, it meant we could hit it lower or higher with minimal set-up changes. In testing, it displayed a slight fade bias, with 60 per cent of shots fading right of target line and only 25 per cent left, the rest were straight. 

Rogue ST MAX OS Hybrid

(Image credit: Matthew Moore)
Longest and fastest on test

Specifications

Lofts: 119°, 21°, 24° (RH / LH) ,27°, 30°, 33° (RH only)

Reasons to buy

+
Longest and fastest Rogue ST hybrid in our tests
+
Larger more forgiving head is super easy to hit
+
Widest range of hybrid lofts ever from Callaway

Reasons to avoid

-
Non adjustable for loft

Callaway has released the Rogue ST Max OS hybrid for 2022 with a larger head, beefed up forgiveness and a helpful draw bias designed for golfers that are looking to correct a slice.

The Rogue ST Max OS instantly reminded us of the iconic Adams and Sonartec hybrids, objects of cult status among better players for so long and now sadly fallen from golf’s top table.

Max OS is billed as the most forgiving in the ST line-up, which just so happens to have a high launch and a mid-spin profile. It’s a perfect long iron replacement and will interest golfers who want a club that sits between a fairway wood and 4-iron.

Our TrackMan testing proved that the Rogue ST Max OS is faster and longer, with the average ball speed being 141 mph across the data set, the fastest of the Rogue ST hybrids we’ve tested. Average total distance was also 244 yards, a full four yards longer than the low spin Rogue ST Pro. Clubhead speed was also quicker by around 2 mph, even though the head is larger and feels heavier than the other Rogue ST hybrids.

The Rogue ST Max OS may surprise a lot of people, especially better players who opt for it over hybrids pitched at the lower handicap bracket. Breaking it right down, it’s longer, faster, more forgiving and plays like the Adams and Sonartec clubs that used to get so much love out on the tours. Final word, it's also available in the widest range of lofts ever for a Callaway hybrid which, added to its test performance, makes it our pick of the best Callaway golf hybrids.

Forgiveness and Versatility

Specifications

Lofts: 19°, 21° 24° (RH & LH), 27° (RH only)

Reasons to buy

+
One of the longest hybrids
+
Impressive forgiveness levels

Reasons to avoid

-
On the expensive side

Callaway has enjoyed huge success with its hybrids of late, chief among which is the updated version of the Callaway Apex. It features many of the same technologies as its predecessors, but the jailbreak technology has been given an upgrade.

Artificial intelligence was once again key to the design of the new Jailbreak Velocity Blades that are angled and more spread out than they have been in any model since it was first introduced in 2016. The result is more forgiveness across the face and more speed, particularly at the bottom of the club where golfers often mishit their shots.

In addition, the blades also allow the Face Cup to flex more for consistent spin rates and therefore, flight, with tungsten weight being specifically placed into each loft, therefore offering lower CG, as well as creating a club that promotes high launch and forgiveness.

Callaway Apex Pro Hybrid

Best For Lower Handicappers

Specifications

Lofts: 18°, 20°, 23°, 26° (RH & LH)

Reasons to buy

+
Powerful performance
+
Compact and workable

Reasons to avoid

-
Small profile will put some off

A hybrid which shone in our Editor's Choice 2021 (opens in new tab) list, the Apex Pro continues in Callaway's range for 2022. It's more compact than the standard Apex 21 hybrid and produces a more penetrating flight.

Looks wise, at address, there is definite iron-like profile to it so, if your irons stop at the 5, then there is a very easy flow to the set by adding this.

This is aimed at the better player who wants a long iron-type trajectory and can generate plenty of clubhead speed, with Callaway’s Face Cup Technology designed to deliver great speed and spin consistency across the face, which tempers the powerful flight and distance in order to retain accuracy.

This club packs a punch and there is the workability and control that the strong player will be looking for, rather than more forgiving models designed predominantly to launch the ball higher.

Callaway Big Bertha B21 Hybrid

Best For Slicers

Specifications

Lofts: 19°, 21° 24°, 27°, 30°, 33°

Reasons to buy

+
Wide soles and thick toplines inspire confidence
+
Easy to launch

Reasons to avoid

-
Offset look at address may put off some golfers

A model that also featured in our best hybrid golf clubs for high handicappers (opens in new tab) guide, the Callaway Big Bertha B21 range promises easy launch, added distance through lower spin and extra slice-fighting assistance.

The hybrid shares many of the same technologies as the driver, as well as additional offset to promote a straighter flight.

To further enhance launch and trajectory, the hybrids incorporate dual MIM'ed (Metal Injected Moulding) tungsten weights into the sole. Meanwhile, Jailbreak bars boost ball speed.

For anyone looking for a distance-boosting hybrid, but one that also offers lots of forgiveness, this is a model well worth trying, especially for those who struggle with a slice.

Callaway Big Bertha Reva Women’s Hybrid

Best Callaway Hybrid For Women

Specifications

Lofts: 24°, 27°, 30°, 33°, 36°

Reasons to buy

+
Technology to help hit it further and easier
+
Premium looks

Reasons to avoid

-
Offset will put some off

Callaway has built the Big Bertha Reva to make the game easier for women.

Easy-to hit, the oversized Bertha shape with a shallower face enhances forgiveness for consistent contact and smooth turf interaction.

It also incorporates Callaway’s Jailbreak technology, where two bars connect the crown and sole to increase stiffness and promote even more speed, whilst increased offset reduces slice to promote a draw ball flight. Like the B21 model above, to improve launch and trajectory Callaway has implemented dual MIM’ed (Metal-Injected Molding) Tungsten weights into the sole of the clubhead.

It comes with a lightweight shaft that is specifically designed to boost swing speed and a Lamkin Women’s ST Soft Grip.

How we test hybrids

When it comes to Golf Monthly's testing procedure, we use the same ethos and methodology for all golf products to make sure they are as insightful, honest and comprehensive as possible. When it comes to golf clubs, we usually attend product launches so we can meet with the manufacturer’s R&D experts to understand the new technology.

After we have an understanding here, our first port of call when hitting clubs is usually the indoor simulator at Foresight Sports, where the team can test in a controlled environment using premium balls and the GCQuad launch monitor. We also use TrackMan at golf facilities across the UK.

We then do outdoor testing, usually on ranges at West Hill Golf Club, Surrey, The Wynyard Club in Teesside and at Brancepeth Castle Golf Club in Durham. We then put the clubs into play out on these golf courses.

Specifically for hybrids, product testing is headed up by Matthew Moore, supported by technical editor Joel Tadman. Both are competitive low handicap golfers, able to efficiently test the biggest product releases and successfully communicate equipment technology and product features to a wide golfing audience.

How to choose the right hybrid

It's one thing knowing what the best golf hybrid clubs on the market are, and something else entirely choosing which model to add to your bag. So, how do you make such a decision?

In an ideal world, a properly executed club fitting will provide the answers - the amount of data available covering things like swing speed, club path, ball speed, angle of attack, and distance is quite staggering. One of these will definitely get the right make and model in your hands.

However, if this isn't possible for whatever reason, we have a few tips.

Performance -  How a hybrid performs is the most important factor. You are looking for versatility that will improve your scores and help you out of trouble in a range of on-course situations. We would recommend trying out hybrids off the tee, from the rough, fairway, around the green and even from the middle of low-lipped fairway bunkers. You need to gauge how well they perform for you and a demo day is an ideal opportunity to do the kind of testing you need to be sure a hybrid is right for you. 

Feel -  A thorough test can inform how some clubs feel during the golf swing and most importantly at impact. Some models sound loud at impact, others are more muted. Some will feel like the contact is a dense thud, others will feel hot and energetic off the face. Feel is entirely subjective and personal to the player. Again, we recommend hitting some models indoors and outdoors, so you can have an idea of what you like and dislike.

Looks - With all golf clubs you need to like how they look, especially at address, because you don't want to be distracted by a club you really don't enjoy looking at. Take some time to shop around, feel the club in your hands and see if you like the way it looks and feels at address. Does it match the rest of your set-up, will you feel completely comfortable putting it in the bag? As much as it may seem vain to judge a club on looks, it can increase your confidence on-course if you love the look of your hybrid when you pull the headcover.

Not every hybrid is the same. Some are more wood-like in appearance, whilst others have a higher toe and are designed to look more like an iron.

Budget - The penultimate factor you should consider is budget. Given the number of hybrids available on the market, you can find a quality club at most price points and to suit almost any budget. If you want a premium brand model then you can get one, or if you want to save money, there is usually value for money to be found if you are happy not to own a club by a marquee manufacturer.

Testing - We hate to sound like a broken record but go to a range and try some out. Most places still tape clubs up and let you conduct your own range test. It won't be as thorough as a custom fit but you can draw some conclusions.

For example, you'll be able to get a sense for the weight and looks of the club and whether the shaft suits the way you swing it. 

Hitting some shots, even with tape on the face, will also give you an idea of how easy each hybrid is to hit and get airborne. For higher handicappers, this will likely be very helpful.

Better golfers may be in the market for something that's more workable and therefore would be suited to something with plenty of hosel adjustability.

Ultimately, it depends on what aspect(s) of performance you value above all else and which hybrid is able to tick the most boxes for your game.

FAQs

What hybrids replace what irons?

Typically, a 3-iron is replaced by a 19 degree hybrid or a 5-wood, a 4-iron is replaced by a 22 degree hybrid or a 7-wood, a 5-iron is replaced by a 25 degree hybrid, and a 6-iron is replaced by a 28 degree hybrid.

Why should I use a hybrid golf club?

Hybrid clubs combine all the best qualities of both fairway woods and long irons while attempting to avoid the negatives of both. Essentially, they are easier to hit from all manner of lies, with the extra weight and control being great out of the rough, whilst the support behind the sweet spot helps the ball into the air from bare lies.

Matthew Moore fell in love with golf hitting an old 3-iron around his school playing field imagining rugby posts were flags and long jump pits as bunkers.

He earned golf scholarships to the University of St Andrews and Emory University, Atlanta, U.S.A and dreamed of playing professionally before training as a journalist.

He has worked at Golf Monthly and CNN Sports as well as covering golf news, features, products and travel as a freelance writer and TV presenter for newspapers, magazines and corporate clients. Matthew has interviewed Ryder Cup Captains, Major Champions and legends of the game and rates sharing a glass of rioja and a bowl of nuts with Miguel Angel Jimenez as his favourite moment. Matthew plays off 1, has won five club championships and aced the first hole of Augusta National’s Par-3 course in 2002.