Callaway Rogue ST Max Hybrid Review

Our verdict on the Callaway Rogue ST Max Hybrid tested on course, the range and with TrackMan

Callaway Rogue ST Max Hybrid Review
Callaway Rogue ST MAX Hybrid
(Image credit: Matthew Moore)
Golf Monthly Verdict

A high launch, mid spin hybrid with a semi-draw bias. One of the most accurate hybrids we’ve tested so far in 2022, Rogue ST Max is packed with playability and performance and will appeal to a wide range of golfers who want a forgiving long iron replacement.

Reasons to buy
  • +

    Premium elegant looks

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    Larger more forgiving head is super easy to hit

  • +

    One of the straightest, most accurate hybrids we’ve tested in 2022

Reasons to avoid
  • -

    Draw-bias clubface may look closed to the eye of some players

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    Non adjustable for loft

Callaway Rogue ST Max Hybrid Review

Callaway has released the Rogue ST Max hybrid for 2022 with a serious billing, calling it “the longest Rogue ST hybrid,” in “our fastest family of hybrids ever.” It’s a lot to live up to, especially in a family of four, but few things make you fight harder than sibling rivalry.

There are four new Rogue ST hybrid models this year replacing the Callaway Mavrik line. Each has its own distinct head shape and performance build. The Rogue ST MAX succeeds the Apex Hybrid which stood out as one of the best golf hybrid clubs in last year’s test and stays in the range for 2022.

Rogue ST MAX Hybrid

L to R: Rogue ST MAX and Apex Hybrid

(Image credit: Matthew Moore)

Golf is tough, especially hitting long irons into small greens, which is why hybrids have become a popular choice because they are easier to hit, launch higher and land softer. All the tour proven Callaway technology is built into this club. The new Jailbreak ST system pushes the two ‘batwings’ further towards the perimeter, keeping the stiffness for the high MOI while letting the face flex more for better ball speed.

ST stands for Speed Tuned and the Rogue metal woods range, from driver through to hybrid, is geared around delivering higher ball speed for distance gains. During testing, this club produced lots of the performance benefits you’ll be looking for in a good hybrid. It flew with a powerful rainbow shaped flight and stopped quickly going into greens on long par 3 holes and tough par 4s.

I had no trouble hitting it from rough, cupped lies or off sloping fairway lies. The smooth camber of the sole seemed to help it zip through turf. It’s got a larger head than the Rogue ST Pro hybrid and has been built with a semi-draw bias. Unsurprisingly, it’s more forgiving than the better player model. The matte black crown really shouts premium.

Callaway Rogue ST MAX HYbrid

(Image credit: Matthew Moore)

Using a TrackMan launch monitor, I was surprised by the ball speeds and distance I got with the Rogue ST Max. At 137.5 mph, it was the slowest of the three Rogue ST hybrids I tested and my total average distance of 219 yards was about the same as the ST Pro and five yards shorter than the oversized head.

It’s worth saying that I tested Rogue ST Max late on a day when I’d hit over 250 balls, with 13 different clubs, after a bout of Covid a fortnight earlier, so it’s likely my tank was running empty and this data set is weaker as a result.

TracKMan

Disclosure: I wasn't at my max when testing the Rogue ST Max Hybrid 

(Image credit: Matthew Moore)

One huge positive from the test was that this club was the straightest and had the best dispersion of any hybrid on test. Looking at whether I’d swap a long iron for the Rogue ST Max, producing arrow straight 219 yard shots, the answer is yes; in a heartbeat.

It may not have been the longest and fastest Rogue ST hybrid in my test but I did love how consistent and forgiving the ST Max was. Couple that with great looks and Callaway’s reliability of performance, then it’s clear this hybrid would improve the play of a wide range of golfers.

Available in four loft options from 18° to 26° (3H, 4H, 5H and 6H) and at retail now for RRP £249.

Matthew Moore fell in love with golf hitting an old 3-iron around his school playing field imagining rugby posts were flags and long jump pits as bunkers.

He earned golf scholarships to the University of St Andrews and Emory University, Atlanta, U.S.A and dreamed of playing professionally before training as a journalist.

He has worked at Golf Monthly and CNN Sports as well as covering golf news, features, products and travel as a freelance writer and TV presenter for newspapers, magazines and corporate clients. Matthew has interviewed Ryder Cup Captains, Major Champions and legends of the game and rates sharing a glass of rioja and a bowl of nuts with Miguel Angel Jimenez as his favourite moment. Matthew plays off 1, has won five club championships and aced the first hole of Augusta National’s Par-3 course in 2002.