Best Golf Swing Analyzers 2023

Take a look at some of the best golf swing analyzers on the market that should help you understand and improve your action

Best Golf Swing Analyzers
(Image credit: Golf Monthly)

Best Golf Swing Analyzers

When it comes to the golf swing, many can get drawn in to looking for perfection. When watching the professionals on the television, we often marvel at the power, speed and flexibility they generate, asking the question 'how do I do that?'

Of course, it is unlikely that you will ever be able to replicate their swings, especially as everyone is different. However, what the individual can do is maximize the potential from their own swing and, thanks to the wonders of technology, it's almost easier than ever to ingrain an improved movement pattern, with help from a golf swing analyzer tool.

First and foremost, we would recommend seeing your local professional if you are either taking up the game of golf, or if you are looking to overhaul and make a drastic change. Crucially though, following the aforementioned lesson, it comes down to practicing your new swing and making sure you don't fall back into old habits. Here is where a swing analyzer comes in, as not only does it allow you to see your changes, but gives you useful feedback presented in various styles to suit your needs. 

Below, we have taken a look at the best products currently available, with these items working well in tandem with the best golf training aids (opens in new tab), as well as the best golf launch monitors (opens in new tab)

Best Golf Swing Analyzers

Why you can trust Golf Monthly Our expert reviewers spend hours testing and comparing products and services so you can choose the best for you. Find out more about how we test.

dewiz app

(Image credit: Future)

Specifications

Analyzes: Hand path

Reasons to buy

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Innovative device that connects feel and real
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Real time feedback on your hand position initiates rapid change
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Variety of training modes

Reasons to avoid

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Takes time to get used to how it works
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Challenge feature could be better

Trusted by five major champions, including Bryson DeChambeau, Vijay Singh and Annika Sorenstam, DeWiz is one of the most reliable swing analyzers in golf. It costs a similar amount to a portable launch monitor, and is ideal for golfers that are more interested in what their body is doing versus what the ball is doing and it should lead to more effective swing changes for the golfer looking to improve.

The wristband you receive is a sleek and stylish device that will look great paired with any outfit. It combines with a unique and easy to use application, which lets you see, view and record all of your swing data in one easy to read system. The unique learning stimuli feature gives you instant feedback via an electronic pulse should you stray from certain preset parameters, encouraging you to repeat your new movement. From our testing, we found the DeWiz to be a highly effective tool that gives players real-time feedback on whether they are implementing changes in movement, perhaps prescribed by their coach. 

Blast Golf Swing Analyser unboxed

(Image credit: Dan Parker)

Specifications

Analyzes: Speed, tempo, timing, hand path

Reasons to buy

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Measures a huge amount of metrics
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Instant feedback via an app
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Encourages meaningful, focussed practice sessions
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Can be used indoors or outdoors

Reasons to avoid

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Sensor attaches to clubs rather awkwardly
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Beginners may struggle to comprehend the data

Practice anywhere, any time, on any part of your golf game with the Blast Golf swing trainer. This is a clever device for driven golfers looking to improve all elements of their swing and ball striking. While a few things need to be ironed out from a user experience point of view, the Blast Golf Swing Analyser has the potential to transform the way you practice allowing you to work on your angle of approach, impact speed and angle all using it's easy to use application and club sensors. 

Firstly, attach the sensors to your golf clubs and get ready to start swinging. As you play you'll see a wide breadth of data accumulating in the Blast Golf app. And some of it is seriously impressive, but I found it initially quite an overwhelming experience. The speed of the feedback, the accuracy of the data and the way it feeds it back is incredibly intuitive. When you're swinging, a simple red, amber and green banner lets you know when you’re in the right part of a specific metric. It’s a fantastic way to practice with some intent on the range, as opposed to aimlessly hitting balls.

Voice Caddie T9 Golf GPS Watch Review

(Image credit: Tom Miles)

Specifications

Analyzes: Tempo

Reasons to buy

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Bright, responsive touch screen
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Plenty of strategy-enhancing features
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Versatile for off-course wear

Reasons to avoid

-
Green undulations weren't always accurate
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Automatic shot tracking wasn't obvious

Voice Caddie's reputation in the golf technology industry proceeds itself and this is by far one of the best golf watches (opens in new tab) around. The T9 redefines what a smart golf watch can do. With slope functionality, heat-mapped greens and hole maps with flyovers, it has all the information you need to optimize your club selection and strategy, presented in a slick, stylish and user-friendly package. 

But what's more is that it also delivers a very cool feature called a Tempo Trainer - something that not every GPS watch can deliver. The watch uses specially designed sensors to track the consistency of your movements in your swing. Use it to practice indoors or outdoors and it'll give you some excellent feedback on how fast you're swinging the club in each rotation. 

BioMech Putt Sensor

(Image credit: BioMech Putt Sensor )

Specifications

Analyzes: Putting metrics

Reasons to buy

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Fairly easy to set up and use
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Provides a comprehensive analysis of the putting stroke
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Is lightweight and easy to store in golf bag

Reasons to avoid

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Requires a monthly or annual subscription in addition to initial cost

While it may not be the most discreet analyzer on this list, the BioMech Putt sensor and app, are without a doubt one of the best trainers for those looking to iron out any yips in their putting game. And if you're serious about working on your putting, the BioMech Putt sensor and app can give you instant feedback on every aspect of your stroke, letting you know where you need to make adjustments to be more consistent. 

Coming at a fraction of the cost of what one of the big putting trainers might cost you, the BioMech sensor fits to the shaft of your flat stick nicely. It weighs just 18g so you wont feel it in your swing. And the power of this sensor is clear to see, measuring everything from the tempo of your stroke to the loft of your club face at impact. It also gives you a total score out of 100 for each putt, which was a handy tool I liked that helped me become more consistent, hitting that putt again and again. 

Zepp Golf 2 Swing Analyser

(Image credit: Zepp)

Zepp Golf 2 Swing Analyzer

Specifications

Analyzes: Club speed, club plane, tempo and backswing length

Reasons to buy

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Used by some of the biggest names in golf
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Measures and helps with an array of factors, such as tempo, clubhead speed and plane
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Helpful for both coaches and amateurs

Reasons to avoid

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A little complicated to get all the parts working together 

Used by some of golf's biggest names, the Zepp 2 Swing Analyzer is a very cool piece of kit that allows players to see the exact path of their swing and track everything from their tempo to their club face angle on impact. It's a great tool to have if you're struggling with consistency, and works by attaching a lime-green sensor to your golf glove. Connect that sensor up to Zepp's app, and start swinging. It will give you instant and reliable data on things like your club plane, hand plane, swing tempo, club speed and most interesting of all, show you a 3D image of the path of your golf swing. 

ExPutt Unisex Ex500d Golf Putting Simulator

(Image credit: ExPutt)

Specifications

Analyzes: Putting stroke

Reasons to buy

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Practice your putting indoors
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Simulates reel breaking greens
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Insightful analysis on your putting stroke

Reasons to avoid

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High price point

Having a practice green in your living room is perhaps every golfers dream. While a standard putting mat (opens in new tab) can help you hone in on the consistency of his swing, they don't always allow you to see the analytics and data behind your club swing. And if you do want to see in depth analysis on your swing, well the ExPutt simulator is the right product for you. It comes with a putting mat and a camera that track each shot you play - all you need is a television, a ball and your flat stick. 

The equipment will deliver reliable and useful data that you can use to tweak your stroke. It'll tell you all about your head speed and clubface angle but also lets you play fun and competitive putting games against your friends. It'll also help you practice on different kinds of green undulation, with golfers able to practice hitting the right angle on a breaking putt on the mat. 

How we test swing analyzers

At Golf Monthly we have a comprehensive testing procedure (opens in new tab) around swing analyzers. As you would expect, this involves using different models out on the course and at home, over a number of rounds and training sessions to give us an idea on how particular models operate and the kinds of data they deliver. 

As the entire team are regular golfers, swing analyzers get compared to one another side by side to test for things like accuracy, waterproofing, durability and other features. That way we can give honest and insightful feedback to you. The final thing we wanted to mention in this section is no manufacturer can buy a good review. Our testing team reviews golf equipment and makes its own opinion on how good or bad the product is. 

What to consider when buying a swing analyzer

Swing analyzers can be very technical products. They can also be very expensive, so if you're thinking about buying a new golf swing analyzer, you'll need to ensure you're getting the right one for you. Here are a few handy tips to bear in mind when buying a new swing analyzer.

1. What you're looking to test

This is a straightforward point, but there's no point in buying a Garmin TruSwing if you want to hone in on your putting game. Granted, the TruSwing might be able to help in some way, but it won't give you as reliable putting data as the ExPutt simulator. For that reason, look to the attributes of each product and see which matches up best to the area of your game you want to improve. 

2. What information do you want to obtain?

Before buying a new swing analyzer, it's wise to understand what areas of your swing you want to improve. That'll help you better understand the information and data you need to help you improve everything from your ball striking to your club speed. For example, if you find yourself slicing a lot, you may want to get a sensor that will show you the angle of your clubface on attack. Or if you're the type of golfer looking to strike through harder, then maybe swing analyzers that deliver club speed data are the way to go. 

3. Clip on or screw in

If you're looking at buying a sensor for your longer clubs, you can either get sensors that clip onto the shaft of your club, clip onto your glove, or screw into the top of your grip. Each can be fiddly to use and it depends on your comfort preferences as a player of what kind of trainer you want to use. Screw in sensors tend to be the most preferred option, but clip on options can give slightly cooler data showing you 3D models of your club plane. 

4. Budget

Like some of the best launch monitors (opens in new tab), swing analyzers do not come cheap. For that reason it's wise to asses your budget and what you want to use the sensor for. You may want to factor your experience level into that as well, and I'd advise against a beginner or low handicap golfer forking out a lot of money for a state of the art swing sensor. 

5. Applications

Be also careful to check what other equipment you need to use your swing sensors. Many use applications that must be downloaded to a tablet or smartphone. Some may also require you to enter personal information in order to gain access to their software, while others may work on a subscription based service. To avoid disappointment, make sure to read the fine print before you buy your swing analyzer.

Golf technology is becoming more and more popular nowadays, so if you're in the market to kit yourself out with all the latest gear, check out our guides on the best golf rangefinders (opens in new tab), best golf watches (opens in new tab) and best golf GPS (opens in new tab) devices.

FAQs

What do golf swing analyzers do?

Golf swing analyzers allow players to collect data on all aspects of their swing. They can then look at that data and use it to decipher how they can improve their game, by altering the way they strike the ball. 

Are swing analyzers worth it?

Typically, yes, but it can often depend on your experience level. Experienced players may benefit more from a session with a swing analyzer than a beginner, who may need more time to perfect their technique before looking at the numbers behind their game.

How do golf sensors work?

Depending on the product, golfers can attach the senors to their club, usually by screwing them into their club grip, and link those sensors up to an application. All they need to do then is play a few shots and start to see the data come in on their smart device. That should show them numbers on how well they are hitting the ball as well as what they can do to improve their swing.

If you want more buying advice, why not take a look at our guides on the best golf net, or best golf mat as well.

Matt Cradock
Staff Writer

Matt joined Golf Monthly in February 2021 covering weekend news, before also transitioning to equipment and testing. After freelancing for Golf Monthly and The PGA for 18 months, he was offered a full-time position at the company in October 2022 and continues to cover weekend news and social media, as well as help look after Golf Monthly’s many buyers’ guides and equipment reviews.


Taking up the game when he was just seven years of age, Matt made it into his county squad just a year later and continues to play the game at a high standard, with a handicap of around 2-4. To date, his best round came in 2016, where he shot a six-under-par 66 having been seven-under through nine holes. He currently plays at Witney Lakes in Oxfordshire and his favourite player is Rory McIlroy, despite nearly being struck by his second shot at the 17th during the 2015 BMW PGA Championship.


Matt’s current What’s In The Bag?

Driver: Honma TW747, 8.75°

Fairway Wood: TaylorMade Rocketballz Stage 2, 15°, 19°

Hybrid: Adams Super Hybrid, 22°

Irons: Mizuno MP54, 5-PW

Wedges: Cleveland 588 RTX 2.0 Tour Satin, 50°, 56°, 60°

Putter: Cleveland TFI 2135 Satin Cero

Ball: Titleist Pro V1x