Best High Bounce Wedges 2024

We run through some of the best wedges on the market with high bounce at the forefront of the design.

Best High Bounce Wedges
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Best High Bounce Wedges: Quick Menu

Best High Bounce Wedges

One of the most difficult areas of your golf game to master is the short game. This is where easy shots can be picked up on the course and is often why your wedges are known as your scoring clubs. And we all know how hard it is to be consistent around the greens. Some of the best golf wedges are designed to be playable off all kinds of lies, but we all know that every now and then there is a chance that you might chunk a chip shot, hitting your club into the ground before bottoming out on the golf ball. If you're prone to doing that, that's where wedge bounce wedge can help you.

If you didn't already know, some of the most forgiving wedges in the game deliver a degree of bounce that will vary depending on what lie you want to use that club from. If we're talking technically, wedge bounce is the angle created between where the leading edge and the lowest point of the sole strikes the ground. The higher the degree of bounce, the higher the leading edge will be off the surface at address, meaning that there is less chance your clubface will drag in the ground when you bottom out. 

As a general rule, high bounce clubs are better for softer, fluffier lies, while lower bounce wedges are more appropriate for firmer lies, like compacted bunkers. And depending on your swing type, you may want to think about what type of wedge is best for you! Thankfully, there are a ton of excellent options out there on some of the best wedges in the game that can deliver a range of lofts in their bounce. We've highlighted below some of the best wedges for high bounce, but while you're here, why not also check out our guides to the best pitching wedges, best gap wedges and best lob wedges

The Quick List

Best High Bounce Wedges

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Titleist Vokey SM10 Wedge

Titleist Vokey SM10 Wedge Review

(Image credit: Future)

Specifications

Lofts: 46°-62°
Grinds: 5 (F, S, M, K, D)
Finishes: 4 (Tour Chrome, Nickel, Jet Black, Raw)

Reasons to buy

+
Improved spin performance
+
Lower launch for more control
+
25 lie, loft, and bounce combinations

Reasons to avoid

-
Raw finish is no longer a standard offering

The SM10 which Titleist released in 2024 now features progressive shaping, which we think makes the club look fantastic at address across all the lofts available. The stronger lofts in these wedges come with a smaller head shape compared to the more lofted ones, they also come with a straighter leading edge compared to the likes of the sand and lob wedge. 

When you compare the SM10 to last year's model you can see the lofted clubs have a sharper look when behind the ball, even with the more rounded leading edge. The higher lofts come with a bigger footprint, which helps to give them a more confidence-inspiring look which is going to help when over those tricky chips on tight lies. 

In testing we saw that the wedges were only slightly better on the spin from 50 yards out, it wasn't until we tested them from 75 yards that you saw the big difference to the SM9 with nearly 200rpm more. It should also be noted that Titleist sets the standard when it comes to wedge set-up options with 25 different combinations of loft, bounce and grind.

Cleveland CBX 4 Zipcore Wedge

Cleveland CBX 4 Zipcore Wedge Review

(Image credit: Future)

Specifications

Lofts: 44°- 60°
Grinds: V,S,C
Finishes: 1

Reasons to buy

+
Great feel on fuller shots
+
Generous amounts of spin
+
Wide sole helps with strike consistency

Reasons to avoid

-
Larger head size may put some better players off

The CBX 4 Zipcore from Cleveland comes in on the slightly bigger side to help with forgiveness and give you more confidence at address. With a rounded leading edge, you get more versatility for your approach shots and when around the greens, giving us more creativity in testing, to adapt ball flight and change spin. With a Hydrazip face these wedges create great levels of spin with more friction on the surface of the face, meaning these are great even in wetter conditions. 

With this wedge you get the same Zipcore technology that is found through most of the best wedges from Cleveland, What this does is allow the heavier steel found in the hosel to be replaced with a light and strong material that helps to reduce vibrations. Thanks to the weight saving from this, they can redistribute the weight across the toe and higher up, therefore increasing MOI by 7.8% and optimizing CG placement. 

Ping S159 Wedge

Ping S159 Wedge Review

(Image credit: Future)

Specifications

Lofts: 46°-62°
Grinds: S, W, E, H, T, B
Finishes: 2 (Chrome & Black)

Reasons to buy

+
Premium looks
+
Produces extremely high levels of greenside spin
+
Mid-sized head will inspire confidence for those who need it

Reasons to avoid

-
Clean look could limit shelf appeal for some

If you are looking for a wedge that has a slightly larger footprint than something like the SM10 then the S159 wedges from Ping are perfect. They have a bladed look, so they look great and suit the eye of a better player but have a larger footprint to inspire more confidence at address. 

When we tested these wedges we found them to be mightily impressive. The feel from the face was soft and despite a vibration dampening slot placed on the back of the head, these wedges offered plenty of feedback. You also get a nice consistent mid to high launch and the spin performance is absolutely outstanding, especially on chip and pitch shots.

While these wedges aren't some of the most forgiving wedges or best wedges for beginners, that isn’t what they were designed for. They are targeted towards the more confident ball striker who is looking for a classic looking wedge, but with a bit of technology to help performance.

Mizuno T24 Wedge

Mizuno T24 Wedge Review

(Image credit: Future)

Specifications

Lofts: 46°-60°
Grinds: 5 (S, D, V, X, C)
Finishes: 3 (Chrome, Raw, Denim Copper)

Reasons to buy

+
Super spin control
+
Wide range of finishes available

Reasons to avoid

-
Raw finishes scuffs up quickly

The T24 from Mizuno has been designed with a timeless look that is not far off the look you get from the SM range at Titleist. This wedge comes in three finishes, soft white Satin, Denim Copper, and Tour Raw. We tested the Soft White Satin finish and it is personally our favorite. 

Not only does this wedge look great but it backs it up with performance too, and is a very versatile wedge that can suit a wide range of players. Should you not be the most confident chipper of the ball though then this may not be best as it has quite a compact head so it may suit the eye of a better golfer in that aspect. It is a high-spinning wedge and has plenty of high-bounce options though so it does have some forgiveness should you need it. 

MacGregor V Foil Wide Sole Sand Wedge

macgregor v foil wide sole sand wedge

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An incredibly forgiving wedge

Specifications

Lofts: 66º
Grinds: 1
Finishes: 1 (Steel)

Reasons to buy

+
Helps to reduce fat and thin chips
+
Promotes straighter shots
+
Confidence-inducing

Reasons to avoid

-
Right hand only

This Wide Sole, 66º model from MacGregor is one of the most forgiving wedges on the market. The wide sole is designed to reduce miss-hits, by eradicating thin and fat shots, helping players to strike the ball off the center of the clubface. It also makes it harder for the club to dig into the turf; instead, causing the club to glide over the ground and scoop the ball into the air.

We found it was very adept from bunker shots but really came into its own when we were faced with shots we would normally use a lob wedge for. The loft of the MacGregor V Foil Wide Sole Sand Wedge is higher than a standard lob wedge, and it proved great at tackling shots such as the chip over a bunker to a narrow strip of green.

Ping Glide 4.0 Wedge

Ping Glide 4.0 Glide Review

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Best for spin

Specifications

Lofts: 46°-60°
Grinds: 4 (SS, WS, TS, Eye2)
Finishes: 1 (Chrome)

Reasons to buy

+
Unrivalled spin
+
Excellent grind options
+
Looks great over the ball

Reasons to avoid

-
Feel takes a while to get used to

The Ping Glide 4.0 wedge looks exceptional - especially in the more traditional teardrop shape that is available in three of the four sole options. It also has the classic Ping Hydropearl 2.0 chrome finish, which reduces glare as well as flyers from the rough in damp conditions while also adding a touch of style to the aesthetics. 

There are four sole options to choose from - WS, SS, TS and Eye2 - which we took advantage of. The WS (wide sole) is where we enjoyed the most success. Turf interaction was exceptional on short shots, making it one of the best wedges for chipping we've ever tested. Finally, unique to Ping’s line-up is the Eye2 sole, which is available in lofts from 54°-60° and is described as the ultimate bunker club - a theory we put to the test. It is undoubtedly one of the best sand wedges on the market due to its forgiveness from various lies and distances.

Most impressive, however, was how easy it was to spin the golf ball. Even when hitting shots that came off a little hotter and lower than expected, the ball sat to attention quicker than most new wedges. 

PXG Sugar Daddy II Wedge

PXG Sugar Daddy II wedges in two finishes

(Image credit: Future)
A well balanced wedge with adjustability

Specifications

Lofts: 50°-62°
Grinds: 2 (C, BP)
Finishes: 2 (Chrome, Xtreme Dark)

Reasons to buy

+
Extremely forgiving
+
Unique levels of adjustability 
+
Well balanced

Reasons to avoid

-
High-toe design won't suit some

The visuals of this wedge are striking thanks to a weight that's been added at the back of the head as well as the introduction of full-face grooves and a high-toe design. Believe it or not, all that was done after PXG received feedback from its tour staff. 

One of the first things we noticed was the balance on offer. It's incredible and makes playing all lengths of shot easy. In addition, there are several bounce and grind options so golfers can tailor their wedges to their setup, delivery and turf conditions. For us, that meant switching into the higher 13-degree bounce model.

Although the high-toe design wasn't to our liking aesthetically, it worked to make this one of the most forgiving wedges we've ever tested. When pitching and hitting full shots, controlling the flight was more simple than usual, while the spin was comparable to anything on the market. It also comes in two finishes: chrome and Xtreme dark, which is a really nice addition.

TaylorMade Hi-Toe 3 Wedge

TaylorMade Hi-Toe 3 Wedge

(Image credit: Future)
A truly stunning wedge with good performance

Specifications

Loft: 50° to 60°
Grind: 3 (Standard, Low, High)
Finishes: 1 (Aged copper)

Reasons to buy

+
High level of spin control
+
Incredible looks from every angle
+
Ample versatility from the four-way cambered sole

Reasons to avoid

-
Only one bounce option available in the low and mid lofts

This brilliantly balanced wedge offers excellent control around the greens for those who struggle with distance from the sand. The Hi-Toe 3 wedge from TaylorMade has a very low centre of gravity and a wide back that provides extra forgiveness and bounce on much shorter shots. Aesthetically, this wedge looks incredible, with its aged copper finish giving a rustic, yet sophisticated look. 

This club excels when it comes to adding spin to the golf ball. We think that is partly due to the micro-ribs added to the face of the club that give extra traction between the grooves, giving the face of the club additional friction. And you can really feel this work when you strike low, spinny chips onto the greens. 

You'll also find the Hi-Toe comes with full-face grooves, that give extra forgiveness on off-center strikes. The only drawback we can think of is that it won't suit players who tend to get a steep in their downswing, but that being said, it is a great wedge for golfers of all abilities. Plus you also get a lot of high-bounce forgiveness, meaning it is fantastic for digging shots out of deep lying bunkers and heavy rough.

Callaway Jaws Raw Wedge

Callaway Jaws Raw Wedge

(Image credit: Golf Monthly)
Good for those wanting stopping power into greens

Specifications

Lofts: 48°-60°
Grinds: 4 (X, Z, S, W)
Finishes: 2 (Chrome, Black)

Reasons to buy

+
Incredible levels of spin
+
Inspiring looks
+
Easy to flight

Reasons to avoid

-
Feel off the face quite firm
-
Swing weight a little light

Designed by Roger Cleveland and said to feature the deepest, most aggressive grooves in golf, Callaway have added the Jaws Raw wedge to its well-renowned family of golf wedges. When we tested the club it's safe to say we weren't disappointed with the latest offering. Looks-wise, it features the same shape and visuals as we've come to expect from the Jaws range. It is well designed and features a subtle weight system that helps players bounce the club off the turf.

We were really impressed with the spin on offer from the club's micro-grooves and Raw face. Spin on shorter chips was impressive and the control this wedge offered over a variety of different shots is what stood out most about this club. We also found it very easy to get underneath the ball thanks to the Callaway's Z Grind sole that has been designed to skid along the turf rather than dig into it. On firm ground, that makes the Raw Jaws a very handy club to have in your bag. It is a fantastic club for any player looking to generate greater stopping power around the greens.

How we test

When it comes to sand wedges, we conduct a very rigorous testing process. Whether we are sent a product or buy it ourselves, we put everything we review through its paces to ensure we can provide reliable feedback and advice on how each wedge performs. Every member of the Golf Monthly team is an avid golfer and knows what does and does not make for a good sand wedge. 

When testing wedges, we play with the clubs during multiple rounds and also use them in practice to assess how each club perform. If a wedge has a particular characteristic or if it claims to be the ultimate bunker club, we'll put that theory to the test and use that club across a variety of different lies. 

Specifically, when reviewing sand wedges, we assess a number of different factors on the club. For example, we will look at how forgiving that wedge is, how easy it is to generate spin with that club, how the club feels, how much control the wedge provides and the overall aesthetics of the club. For more information on how Golf Monthly tests products, take a look at our methodology here. Wedge testing is headed up by Golf Monthly Staff Writer Sam De'Ath, a former competitor on the EuroPro Tour and Clutch Pro Tours.

How to choose wedges

Wedges are one of the most technical clubs in the game. And when buying a new wedge, there are a ton of things you need to consider. We've put together a brief list of points below that will fill you in on the key points to remember when buying your next wedge.

1. Gapping

Measure your current wedge yardages and how often you are in between clubs to help decide if you need to carry extra options. This is an important part of your bag setup to get right across the entire bag too, because knowing your gaps can allow you to fill out your bag correctly whether that be carrying two, three, or four wedges, which can then impact how many clubs you can carry at the top of the bag. The opposite is true as well. We have also created a guide on the best gap wedges as well so check that out for more information.

2. Bounce

Low bounce wedges are more suited to hard fairways and tight lies, while high bounce wedges are better for softer ground conditions and bunkers. The most bounce you will ever see on a wedge is about 18°, but it can be as low as 2°. The type of bounce you opt for should largely depend on things like your normal angle of attack, the firmness of your fairways and the type of shots you like to hit around the greens. Sometimes it may be best to have a range of wedges with different bounce degrees in your bag. For example, I'd go for a lob wedge with a lot of bounce to help me keep the clubface out of the ground and get the ball up in the air. You may then perhaps opt for a lower bounce pitching wedge to help dig the ball out of tougher lies!

3. Finish

Options like black PVD and copper are becoming increasingly common. The difference is mainly cosmetic, but dark finishes can help reduce glare. Alternatively there are classic chrome and silver designs as you can see above so it is a case of picking a design you like the look of not just at address, but in the bag as well.

4. Grooves

While grooves are now tightly regulated, it is still well worth keeping up to date with the latest designs, which use new milling processes and groove shapes to help move water and dirt away from the ball at impact to create extra spin and improve control. Additionally there are several brands that have brought out wedges with grooves that stretch across the entire face. Admittedly this does take a little bit of time to get used to, but for those players who may struggle with strike, a full faced wedge might do you some favors when creating spin towards the toe. 

5. Forgiveness

Forgiveness is one of the most important things to consider when purchasing a new set of wedges. Many golfers struggle with consistency around the greens and often find themselves chunking chip shots on a regular basis. That can often be eliminated by playing with a wedge that delivers a decent rate of forgiveness. That comes largely back to the weighting of the club and where the centre of gravity sits on the back of the club head. The lower and further back it is, the better chance you have of making a decent connection on the ball and lofting it up into the air - reducing the chance of hitting it fat. Check out our guide on some of the most forgiving wedges for more details! 

For more advice on what wedges to buy, check out our guides on the best wedges for chipping, best sand wedges and best golf wedges for beginners.

FAQs

Are high bounce wedges better?

That depends on your swing and the lie you're playing from. Yes, high bounce wedges tend to perform better on fluffier lies and can add more spin and height to your wedge game. But low bounce wedges can also be effective on tighter lies and in areas where you may need to dig the ball out of firmer ground. 

Are high bounce wedges more forgiving?

Yes, high bounce wedges tend to be the most forgiving. That is because of the way the club head is designed to ensure the club face stays clear of the ground as much as possible. The loft angle on the club means that its toe will bounce clear of the turf and stay clear to strike the ball, allowing players to hit cleaner, fuller chips.  

Who should use high bounce wedges?

High bounce wedges are better suited to players who take a lot of divots in their swing and have a steep angle of attack on the ball. A steep angle of attack can sometimes drive the club face down into the turf, meaning you're more likely to hit the ball fat - but a high bounce wedge combats this by preventing the club face from dragging in the ground. 

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Andrew Wright
Freelance News Writer

A lifelong golf fan, Andy graduated in 2019 with a degree in Sports Journalism and got his first role in the industry as the Instruction Editor for National Club Golfer. From there, he decided to go freelance and now covers a variety of topics for Golf Monthly. 

Andy took up the game at the age of seven and even harboured ambitions of a career in the professional ranks for a spell. That didn’t pan out, but he still enjoys his weekend golf at Royal Troon and holds a scratch handicap. As a side note, he's made five holes-in-one and could quite possibly be Retief Goosen’s biggest fan.

As well as the above, some of Andy's work has featured on websites such as goal.com, dailyrecord.co.uk, and theopen.com.

What's in Andy's bag?

Driver: Callaway Mavrik Sub-Zero (9°)

3-wood: TaylorMade Stealth 2 Plus (15°)

Driving iron: Titleist U500 (17°)

Irons: Mizuno mp32 (4-PW)

Wedges: Titleist Vokey SM9 (50°, 54° and 58°)

Putter: Titleist Scotty Cameron Newport 2.5

Ball: TaylorMade TP5x