Best Titleist Drivers 2023

We review the latest Titleist drivers on the market and advise which model will suit your golf game

A range of Titleist drivers in a grid
(Image credit: Future)

Best Titleist Drivers

Titleist are known for producing some of the best golf drivers (opens in new tab) on the market, with the TSR and TSi range manufactured for a wide range of golfers. Some are designed to be the best golf drivers for distance (opens in new tab), while some aim to be the most forgiving drivers (opens in new tab) that money can buy. Their models are not just used by those on the professional circuit, but they also cater for seniors (opens in new tab), women (opens in new tab) and high handicappers (opens in new tab), with the TSR and TSi range a fantastic addition to anyone's golf bags.

In this piece, I'll be taking you through the best drivers from Titleist, with each driver designed for a specific type of golfer. We at Golf Monthly have also tested (opens in new tab) each individual club, so you know that it's been thoroughly put through its paces.

It is worth noting that the the range can get quite confusing with the drivers sharing such similar names, which is why I have created this guide to try and simplify the Titleist range so you can find the right one for your game. Alternatively, if Titleist is not for you, we have also created guides for other brands too – such as the best Ping drivers (opens in new tab), the best TaylorMade drivers (opens in new tab), or the best Callaway drivers (opens in new tab).

Best Titleist Drivers

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The Titleist TS2 Driver on the course

(Image credit: Future)

Specifications

Lofts : 8°, 9°, 10° & 12°
Adjustable Hosel: Yes
Stock Shafts: HZRDUS RED CB, Tensei AV Blue With Xlink Tech, HZRDUS Black 4G, Tensei 1K Black, Premium Tour AD UB, Premium Tour AD DI, Premium Tour AD IZ
Left Handed Option: 9°, 10° & 11°

Reasons to buy

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Impressively long
+
Consistent flight and distance
+
Aspirational aesthetics are classic and confidence-inspiring

Reasons to avoid

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Not a huge upgrade over the previous generation

Over the last six years, the Titleist driver designers have been on something of a journey. Following the original TS model, we then saw the TSi driver and now we are graced with the TSR, which promises further refinements through, among other technologies, better aerodynamics and a new multi-plateau variable thickness face design. Aesthetically, it boasts the traditional shape that you find in most Titleist drivers, with the new model slightly shorter from front to back and the toe area being a little more rounded. 

If anything, the TSR2 appears a fraction more compact at address, but there's no denying it looks superb. Featuring a powerful feel off the tee, the work that Titleist has done, both on the aerodynamics and on the design of the face, has boosted the speed on offer. Along with the added speed, it's the consistency where it shines as, in testing, the all round playability of the head was incredible and helped favour off-centre strikes. 

Titleist TSR3 Driver Review held aloft

(Image credit: Future)

Specifications

Lofts: 8°, 9°, 10° & 12°
Adjustable Hosel: Yes
Stock Shafts: HZRDUS RED CB, Tensei AV Blue With Xlink Tech, HZRDUS Black 4G, Tensei 1K Black, Premium Tour AD UB, Premium Tour AD DI, Premium Tour AD IZ
Left Handed Option: 8°, 9°, 10°

Reasons to buy

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Premium look and feel
+
Consistently fast and forgiving
+
A tighter dispersion can be created

Reasons to avoid

-
Limited gains over prior model
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A fitting is crucial to maximise performance

Like the TSR2, the TSR3 features the classic-shaped head at address, with the main aim of the driver being to make it faster through the air. Titleist have done this by installing a smoother sole, smaller hosel opening and a taller back section, which is actually more noticeable on the TSR2. 

However, looks wise, it is certainly slick and almost Tesla-inspired with how the weight track and silver strip form a T-shape on the sole. What's more, the five-position SureFit CG track has been neatened up so the weight sits more flush in the extreme positions and a new Variable Thickness Face (VFT) pattern, which Titleist is calling Speed Ring, is tailored towards slightly better players that strike the ball within a more centred area on the face. 

In testing, the numbers were extremely consistent, with the TSR3 minimising drop offs in speed even from off-centre strikes. However, it's the playability that is the most impressive aspect, as it is the easiest driver to manipulate the flight of. Arguably, it's one of the best drivers for slicers (opens in new tab).

Titleist TSR1 Driver on the first tee

(Image credit: Future)

Specifications

Lofts: 9º, 10.5º
Stock shaft: Graphite

Reasons to buy

+
Impressive carry and distance
+
Effortless to launch
+
Confidence-inspiring aesthetics

Reasons to avoid

-
Best suited to a moderate swing speed
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Fitting is key to maximize performance

One of the best the best drivers for women (opens in new tab) the Titleist TSR1 is the latest addition to the Titleist driver family and there is a lot to like here. Visually it looks fantastic, offering a sleek design that can compete with some of 2023's best releases like the Callaway Paradym X (opens in new tab). The quality and sleek design of the shiny black clubhead, combined with the club's silver shaft, provides an aesthetic that makes this a premium driver. The club itself is very light and weighs 40g less than the TSR2. It comes with a lightweight ladies shaft and grip and I was also very impressed by the compactness of the 460cc clubhead, that inspires confidence behind the ball. 

On testing, I was again impressed by the performance this club delivered. It boasts a low center of gravity that helps players launch drives into the air, but also improves the MOI of the club. The aerodynamics of this club felt fantastic and I could feel the speed of the ball off the clubface through impact. That also helps to produce stable drives and I saw some excellent carry distances on my drives. The latest face technology also helped us to maintain consistency in ball speed. But that also delivered excellent forgiveness on off-center strikes. That combined makes this one of the most forgiving drivers (opens in new tab) on the market.

Titleist TSR4 Driver on the fairway

(Image credit: Future)

Specifications

Lofts : 8°, 9°, 10°
Adjustable Hosel: Yes
Stock Shafts: HZRDUS RED CB, Tensei AV Blue With Xlink Tech, HZRDUS Black 4G, Tensei 1K Black, Premium Tour AD UB, Premium Tour AD DI, Premium Tour AD IZ
Left Handed Option: Only 9°

Reasons to buy

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Stunning aesthetics
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Ability to dial in the spin profile is ideal for higher spinning players
+
Impressive distance and consistency

Reasons to avoid

-
Compact shape may be intimidating for some

The last TSR model is the TSR4, which is billed by the brand as the ‘ultimate low spin driver’. Primarily, it's aimed at those who are looking to keep their spin rates under control and maximise their distance off the tee.

First and foremost, the most noticeable difference between the TSR4 and the other two is the size of the head. Coming in at 430cc, it has a much smaller footprint at address. It is also far more compact from heel to toe and it doesn’t extend as far from front to back. 

It still has a beautiful, classic shape, with moveable weights on the sole and back of the head allowing golfers to dial in their spin rates and distances. In testing, it was the longest of the three and, despite the smaller head, the work the brand has done on the new multi-plateau variable thickness face seems to help guard against any major drop off in ball speed when you don’t strike it perfectly. 

Titleist TSi1 Driver resting on the turf

(Image credit: Golf Monthly)

Specifications

Lofts : 9°, 10° & 12°
Adjustable Hosel: Yes
Stock Shaft: Aldila Ascent UL
Left Handed Option: Yes, only in 10°

Reasons to buy

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Designed to be as forgiving and light as possible
+
Will help slicers

Reasons to avoid

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Only designed for slower swingers

Although Titleist have released new models, you will find that the older models pack a punch, with the TSi1 the lightweight option engineered for the moderate (less than 90 mph) swing speed player seeking increased club and ball speed with control off the tee. This driver is best suited for beginners (opens in new tab), seniors or those with a slower swing speed with their driver.

The 460cc TSi1 is almost 40g lighter than standard drivers. It is high launching with mid spin and is the most draw-biased Titleist driver available through its CG positioning. By reshaping the head, engineers were able to move the CG closer to the centre of the face, which results in more ball speed versus the outgoing TS1. It's one of the most lightweight drivers we've tested in years and it really is worth getting one in your hands to feel how truly light it is. 

Titleist TSi2 Driver with a green background

(Image credit: Golf Monthly)

Specifications

Lofts : 8°, 9°, 10° & 11°
Adjustable Hosel: Yes
Stock Shaft: Kuro Kage Black DC 5G SFW, Tensei AV Blue RAW SFW, HZRDUS Smoke Black RDX & Tensei AV White Raw
Left Handed Option: Yes, in all but 8°

Reasons to buy

+
Easy to flight
+
Consistently good distance with plenty of forgiveness

Reasons to avoid

-
No shot shape adjustability

Designed to be easy to hit and consistently long, a number of new technologies has made this possible in the TSi2 - one of the most forgiving drivers out right now. I also think this suits the widest range of golfers out there and high handicappers to single figure golfers should be able to get a lot out of this driver. 

Firstly, a ATI 425 face insert provides greater strength and elasticity for more ball speed across the entire face. Secondly, the head has been reshaped to reduce drag and help players generate more clubhead speed.

In testing, I was struck by how easy the TSi2 was to launch, which allowed us to swing relatively smoothly and still deliver a powerful ball flight. What was also noticeable was the consistency even when shots missed the centre. Behind the ball, it strikes an ideal balance between looking generous in size and easy to hit without appearing too clunky.

Titleist TSi3 driver pictured outdoorsEditors Choice 2022

(Image credit: Future)

Specifications

Lofts: 8°, 9°, 10° & 11°
Adjustable Hosel: Yes
Stock Shaft: Kuro Kage Black DC 5G SFW, Tensei AV Blue RAW SFW, HZRDUS Smoke Black RDX & Tensei AV White Raw
Left Handed Option : Yes, in all but 11°

Reasons to buy

+
Improved looks
+
More effective adjustability

Reasons to avoid

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Some may need more alignment assistance

The TSi3 driver features a more compact, pear-shaped profile and a new SureFit CG Track positioned around the rear skirt, allowing players to alter their shot shape and launch characteristics. Comparing it to the TS3 (opens in new tab), I prefer the more rounded toe and the quieter thud it produces - which is closer to what you might experience with carbon fibre drivers like the TaylorMade Stealth (opens in new tab). This driver is definitely for the slightly better ball strikers, but there is still a decent amount of forgiveness on offer. 

We believe many golfers will also prefer how the sole weight setting is now visible - with the TS3 you had to unscrew and remove the weight to see what it was. With the multitude of settings and shafts available, a custom fitting is a must to get the most out of it and I think it's one of the best drivers for distance (opens in new tab) and best drivers for mid handicappers (opens in new tab) too.

With its more varied adjustability and extra forgiveness on offer, it will appeal to a range of golfers while likely being focused on the better player. The only slight negative I could fine with this driver is that some people may want a bit more alignment assistance on the crown. 

Titleist TSI4 driver being tested

(Image credit: Golf Monthly)

Titleist TSi4 Driver

Specifications

Lofts : 8°, 9° & 10°
Adjustable Hosel: Yes
Stock Shaft : 8 custom fit options
Left Handed Option: Yes, only in 9°

Reasons to buy

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Workability
+
Classic looks
+
Produces seriously low spin

Reasons to avoid

-
For only the best ball-strikers

Another option golfers can choose is the Titleist TSi4 driver, which was in the bag of Adam Scott (opens in new tab) and engineered to be a high-speed, ultra-low spin design. While it is probably up for debate as to whether the TSi3 is solely for the better ball striker, this TSi4 certainly is. 

The TSi4's Centre of Gravity (CG) is the lowest in the TSi family of drivers and it is also the most forward. That allows the driver to deliver less dynamic loft and less spin at impact, providing low spin. A higher MOI versus TS4 also contributes to a higher launch, overall trajectory, and produces more distance for that target player. At 430cc, with a very classic, small pear-shaped profile and improved sound and feel, the TSi4 is also the most workable of all TSi drivers.

How we test

When it comes to product testing (opens in new tab), our reviews and buyers' guides are built upon a rigorous testing procedure as well as the knowledge and experience of the test team. Headed up by Neil Tappin, and assisted by Joel Tadman, both have been testing golf clubs for years and both play to a handicap of 5. Both are also able to efficiently test the vast majority of the biggest product releases and convey the pros and cons eloquently.

Getting into specifics for drivers, we first attend product launches and speak to manufacturers to understand the technology. We then hit the golf clubs indoors, usually at Foresight Sports and test the products with premium golf balls on a launch monitor.

Outdoor testing is the next port of call and this usually takes place at West Hill Golf Club, a course in Surrey with top-notch practice facilities. Ultimately, we aim to be as insightful and honest as possible in our reviews so it is important to acknowledge that no manufacturer can buy a good review. This is because our team tells it how it is.

What to consider when buying a new golf driver

You've probably already asked yourself whether you need to buy a new driver in 2022 (opens in new tab), but there's a few key things to consider when investing in a new driver. Hopefully answering these questions will narrow your search down slightly and make comparing between various models much easier. 

1. What is your priority? 

Have a think about what is the most important thing for you when it comes to the driver. If accuracy is what you're after, go for something with a high MOI or adjustable weights to help alter spin and flight characteristics.

If distance is key to you, which is probably why you are on this guide, look at a low-spinning driver to help ensure your ball doesn't balloon too much. Or if you want forgiveness, then a larger head will probably suit you the best. Many brands make different models for different levels of player, this explains why Titleist has the TSi1 to TSi4 range. 

2. Adjustability

Most models these days come with a degree of adjustability whether it be loft, weight movement, shaft and so on. Therefore have a think about how important adjustability is to you because you can change the characteristics of a club if you want to. Alternatively you can just keep things simple with other models as well.

3. Looks 

You have to like how a golf club looks especially when looking down on the golf ball. So make sure you go and take a look at how different models look in your hands and down by the golf ball.

4. Budget

Finally be aware of your budget. You can go for more premium models, such as the TaylorMade Stealth, or you can go for cheaper designs from Cobra instead. Wherever you fall in terms of price point, there is something for everyone. The Titleist range of drivers have very similar price points. 

5. Custom fitting 

This is probably the most essential part of the driver buying process, no matter the driver you're after or how good you are at the game. A custom fit session will make sure you get the right flex and length of shaft, correct loft and correct head for your game, meaning you'll finish with a driver that will be as suitable as possible for you out on course.

For more options on some of the best drivers (opens in new tab) on the market, why not check out our guides on some of the best Cobra drivers (opens in new tab), best Callaway drivers (opens in new tab) and best Titleist drivers (opens in new tab).

FAQs

What is the most forgiving Titleist driver?

The current most forgiving Titleist driver is either the TSR2 or TSR3. 

What Titleist drivers do the pros use?

Titleist have a lot of signed and unsigned players using its equipment on Tour. However, many will use different models depending on what they are looking for within their game.

Which Titleist driver is best for seniors?

We would recommend any of the TSR2 or TSR3 drivers for seniors as these are the most forgiving in the range. 

Neil Tappin
Digital Editor

In his current role, Neil is responsible for testing drivers and golf balls. Having been a part of the Golf Monthly team for over 15 years and playing off a handicap of 3, he has the experience to compare performance between models, brands and generations. For 2022 he thinks the main trend in drivers is: "In a word, consistency. Whilst all the brands are talking about ball speed (and the new drivers are certainly long), my biggest finding has been how much more consistent the ball flights are. Mishits don't seem to be causing the same level of drop-off or increase in the spin numbers. This means that more shots seem to be flying the way you want them to!" As far as golf balls are concerned the biggest development is in the, "three piece, non-Tour, urethane-covered section. For regular golfers, these models offer superb performance at both ends of the bag without denting your wallet quite as much as the premium Tour-played options."


Originally working with the best coaches in the UK to produce instruction content, he is now the brand's Digital Editor and covers everything from Tour player interviews to gear reviews. In his time at Golf Monthly, he has covered equipment launches that date back well over a decade. He clearly remembers the launch of the Callaway and Nike square drivers as well as the white TaylorMade driver families, such as the RocketBallz! If you take a look at the Golf Monthly YouTube channel, you'll see his equipment videos dating back over a decade! He has also conducted 'What's In The Bag' interviews with many of the game's best players like Rory McIlroy, Dustin Johnson and Jon Rahm. Over the years, Neil has tested a vast array of products in each category and at drastically different price-points. 

Neil is currently playing: Driver: TaylorMade Stealth Plus Fairway Wood: Titleist TSR2 Hybrid: Titleist TS3 Irons (4-9): Mizuno JPX 919 Forged Wedges: Titleist Vokey SM7 46˚, 50˚, 54˚, 60˚ Putter: Odyssey Triple Track Ten Ball: Titleist Pro V1X

With contributions from