Titleist TSR1 Driver Review

In this Titleist TSR1 driver review, Alison Root tests the performance to see what golfers with a moderate swing speed can expect from this final addition to the TSR family

Titleist TSR1 Driver Review
(Image credit: Future)
Golf Monthly Verdict

There's so much to like about the TSR1 driver. It's visually appealing, super lightweight making it effortless to swing, and definitely helps players with a moderate swing speed to generate power for high-launching drives for noticeable distance gains. It's a high price point, but the results make it a worthwhile investment.

Reasons to buy
  • +

    Impressive carry and distance

  • +

    Effortless to launch

  • +

    Confidence-inspiring aesthetics

Reasons to avoid
  • -

    Won't suit faster swingers

  • -

    Fitting is key to maximize performance

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Titleist TSR1 Driver Review

The TSR1 driver is the final addition to Titleist’s TSR metalwood family, joining TSR2, TSR3 and TSR4 as some of the best drivers on the market. Each TSR model has its own performance criteria to suit a player’s swing, but they are all designed with the same purpose - to deliver immediate ball speed and distance gains - and in the case of TSR1, higher launch without sacrificing forgiveness.

The introduction of the TSR1 driver, which is engineered for players with a moderate swing speed of less than 90mph, means that Titleist can now facilitate a complete range of players through their fitting process. 

Before commenting on the design characteristics and performance of this driver, the quality and sleek shape of the shiny black clubhead combined with a silver shaft, provides an aesthetic that epitomises this high-end brand. The headcover is made in a soft leather-look fabric and this adds to its allure and overall classic appearance.

Titleist TSR1 Driver

(Image credit: Future)

The TSR1 sets itself apart from other TSR models by its ultra-lightweight design and is roughly 40 grams lighter than the TSR2. Titleist’s philosophy is to fit golfers to find the best performing products for their game without differentiating between genders, and while this driver might not suit every female (or male) golfer, a lightweight ladies’ shaft and grip does come as a stock configuration in the TSR1 model. The grip and the shaft combined weigh less than some individual grips on the market, so working in tandem with the clubhead, this allows for a super lightweight package.

As someone that uses a ladies’ specific driver with a lightweight graphite shaft, whilst it was great to have the option to try and compare the TSR2 and TSR3 models, as soon as I held the TSR1, in terms of overall weight, it felt very comfortable and similar to what I’m used to. I was also impressed by the compactness of the 460cc clubhead and the way it sits behind the ball, which immediately gave me confidence to feel in complete control and look forward to hitting every drive.

It’s fair to say that over the years not as much emphasis has been put into the aesthetics of faster swinging clubs and a lot of the big-headed drivers have often looked pretty clunky, but nowadays the best drivers for women are far more slick. In 2023, there are some stunning-looking drivers aimed at moderate swing speed players. Models like the Callaway Paradym X, as well as the TSR1 are genuinely aspirational, regardless of what level you play. 

Titleist TSR1 Driver

(Image credit: Future)

Based on how I swing the club and the speed at which I swing it, Trackman data clearly showed that I need to produce more spin to keep the ball up in the air for longer to maximize the performance of my drives. It’s worth mentioning that it’s not just moderate swinging players that can benefit from an increased spin rate. For example, there is often a lot of focus on achieving less spin, but a PGA Tour pro relies on TSR1, as he needs to create more spin to get the ball up, so this reiterates the philosophy that no club fits all and golfers should play with clubs that work for them.

Not that anyone would notice, but the TSR1 driver is quarter of an inch longer than the standard 2, 3 and 4 models, and this is another design characteristic to help moderate swing speed players deliver greater distance.

As for its performance, I can confidently say that the TSR1 driver worked really well. I was able to increase my spin rate and this is largely thanks to the deep center of gravity. Compared with TSR2 and TSR3, the centre of gravity in TSR1 is positioned slightly higher, it might only be a millimeter, but this minute detail contributes to the end result.

Titleist TSR1 Driver

(Image credit: Future)

I love the aerodynamics, as I could really feel the speed of the ball off the clubface through impact for stable high-launching drives. As for carry and distance, compared with my current driver, I did achieve significant yardage gains – approximately 20 yards. Of course, not all my drives were perfect, but with the latest face technology, I found that I maintained consistency in speed and an impressive level of forgiveness on off-center strikes. I also like the unfussy alignment aid on the top of the crown, which simply says 'TSR'.

In the TSR line of clubs, there is a driver to suit everyone, but according to industry research, the moderate speed player accounts for roughly one third of all golfers, so if you fall into this category then TSR1 is definitely worth considering as the best Titleist driver for you.

Alison Root

Alison Root has over 25 years experience working in media and events, predominantly dedicated to golf, in particular the women’s game. Until 2020, for over a decade Alison edited Women & Golf magazine and website, and in addition to writing, overseeing all content and developing industry relationships, she was the go-to voice for TV and radio to comment on breaking women’s golf stories. Alison is also the Editorial Director of Glorious, the new digital platform devoted to elevating women’s sport and that includes golf! She is a 14-handicap golfer (should be better) and despite having had the fantastic opportunity to play some of the best golf courses around the world, Kingsbarns in Scotland is her favourite.