Sun Mountain Colter Jacket Review

Looking to add a wind jacket to your wardrobe? Check out our Sun Mountain Colter jacket review to see if it might be a good option for you

Sun Mountain Colter Jacket Review
(Image credit: Golf Monthly)
Golf Monthly Verdict

A standout option in the Sun Mountain outerwear lineup, the Colter jacket provides the freedom of movement that golfers need while also delivering exceptional wind protection. It is highly impressive from a comfort and temperature control standpoint and offers subtle yet stylish aesthetics.

Reasons to buy
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    Impressive stretch and range of motion

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    Exceptional wind protection

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    Comfortable and versatile

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    Exudes quality in its details

Reasons to avoid
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    Not waterproof if you’re looking for rain gear

Sun Mountain Colter Jacket Review

When it comes to outerwear, Sun Mountain delivers year after year with quality products that span a wide range of categories. One of the newer additions to the Sun Mountain lineup is the Colter jacket, a full-zip, hooded jacket that was created to provide players with exceptional range of motion and protection against the wind. I had the chance to test the Colter jacket the last few weeks and it scored high marks on all of its performance promises while also exceeding my expectations in terms of comfort and versatility.

How tall am I/what is my build?

I am 5-foot-10 and have a stocky build, thick through the shoulders and chest.

What do I normally wear? Does it come up big/small?

I wear extra large almost exclusively in all golf apparel, including outerwear. I might occasionally fit into a large, but in this case I tested the Colter jacket in extra large and it was perfect from a size standpoint. The Colter jacket is also available in sizes ranging from S-3XL.

Sun Mountain Colter Jacket

The Sun Mountain Colter jacket offers exceptional stretch, allowing you to swing without restriction.

(Image credit: Golf Monthly)

How did it fit/feel/perform?

There was a lot to like about the Colter jacket but I was most interested in how well I would be able to swing a golf club while wearing it. On that front, this jacket is exceptional. Even more impressive was how much range of motion the Colter provided while still delivering a quality fit. Plenty of jackets promise freedom of movement only to provide excess space as opposed to actual stretch, and the end result is you feel as if you’re swimming in fabric. That’s not the case here, as the stretch panels Sun Mountain has implemented in the Colter’s design accomplish their task in phenomenal fashion.

Another standout feature of the Colter jacket was the comfort it provided both in terms of hand feel and its value as a layer in different temperatures. In terms of feel, this jacket is extremely soft, from the slick outer body to the jersey-type fabric utilized for the sleeves. The lining in the Colter jacket especially stood out in terms of how soft it felt, a feature that was a personal favorite.

Equally impressive was how much comfort was provided in varying temperatures. On one testing day, I started my round with temps in the low-40s but when I finished it was close to 70. I never took the jacket off and at no point during my round did I feel hot or cold. I’d also add that given how lightweight the design is, the Colter exceeded my expectations in terms of warmth. It might be too light for the coldest winter days, but it’s a great option for brisk spring and fall mornings or evenings.

Wind protection was another area where the Colter excelled, and it would rank as one of the best golf wind jackets (opens in new tab) on the market. I didn’t notice the wind at all on a couple of chilly, breezy mornings when I was testing, and I must say that while I’m generally not a fan of hoods, the Colter’s hood was non-intrusive while swinging and proved to be a nice bonus in terms of keeping my ears warm between shots. The hood also features drawstrings and internal toggles that make it easy to adjust.

It should be pointed out for those who are looking for a rain jacket that the Colter is not waterproof. Sun Mountain offers a number of waterproof options but that was not the intent of the Colter. It does feature Sun Mountain’s DWR (durable water repellent) coating, however, so if you get caught in a shower you’ll have some protection. But again, be advised that this is not a rain jacket (opens in new tab).

Sun Mountain Colter Jacket

The Colter jacket's lining is incredibly soft and the hood is non-intrusive while swinging.

(Image credit: Golf Monthly)

Any extra details we noticed?

A unique feature of this jacket is the number of pockets you have at your disposal. In addition to the two pockets you’d expect for your hands, there’s an external pocket at the top right of the jacket and an internal pocket at the top left, both of which offer great space for a golf glove, billfold, phone, etc. There’s also a nice Sun Mountain logo on the back of the jacket under the neck, and while I’ve touched on the Colter’s lining already, it’s worth mentioning again here, as the soft feel it provided sets this jacket apart. And finally, the Colter is offered in more colors than many of its competitors. I tested the jacket in Steel/Platinum but there are five other options to choose from as well.

Can you wear it off the course?

Absolutely. It’s a sharp-looking jacket that, as mentioned, offers exceptional wind protection, making it a wonderful option for taking a walk in almost any conditions or just spending a day out and about. It certainly wouldn’t qualify as a dressy jacket, but for casual use it will offer more versatility than only being worn on the golf course.

How does it come out of the wash/do you need to iron it?

The instructions for washing the Colter jacket advise to wash it in cold water on a gentle cycle followed by drying on low heat. Having washed the jacket on a couple of occasions, I've found no issues in terms of its material being compromised and I've never needed to iron it after washing.

Chris Wallace
Chris Wallace

Chris joined Golf Monthly in February of 2022, becoming the organization’s first full-time staff writer in the United States. In his role at Golf Monthly, Chris reviews a broad spectrum of golf equipment, ranging from the latest in golf clubs to what’s new in the world of golf technology. His vast experience in the game allows him to look beyond the marketing hype to judge the merits of the latest equipment for golfers of all ability levels. As for the trend in golf equipment that Chris has been most impressed with in recent years, the Players Distance Iron category would earn that distinction, as golfers now have far better options for irons that provide the assistance that so many need in terms of distance and forgiveness without forcing them to sacrifice look and feel.


On a personal level, Chris played college golf and was a three-year letterwinner and two-year captain at Lynchburg College in Virginia and later spent two years as the assistant golf coach at the University of Virginia. The vast majority of his professional career, however, has been spent as a sports writer and editor. In the early phases of his career, he covered college football, college basketball, and golf for different newspapers and websites before turning his attention solely to golf in 2011. Over the course of the past decade, Chris managed the Instruction Blog for GolfChannel.com and more recently created equipment-related content for TGW.com and 2ndSwing.com.


An avid player, Chris currently maintains a handicap index of 2.4 and has a career-low round of 66, which he has shot on three occasions. He lives about 20 miles north of Atlanta in Roswell, Georgia, with his wife, Stacey, and is a member at Atlanta National Golf Club.


Chris is currently playing:

Driver: Callaway Epic Sub Zero, 10.5*

Fairway wood: TaylorMade M3, 17*

Hybrid: Callaway Apex UW, 19*

Irons: Mizuno JPX 921 Forged, 4-PW

Gap wedge: Cleveland RTX 4, 50*

Sand wedge: Titleist Vokey SM6, 56M

Lob wedge: Titleist Vokey SM8, 60L

Putter: SeeMore Nashville Z3C

Ball: TaylorMade TP5x