Best Driving Irons 2024

The best driving irons to give you a solid, straight and long, go-to option from the tee

Best Driving Irons
(Image credit: Golf Monthly)

Getting the best golf irons for your game is imperative if you want to shoot lower scores and we think the same can be said of getting the right bag setup too. It seems many players just plump for the old fashioned three-wood, five-wood configuration without thinking about the possibility of using a utility or driving iron. We think is potentially a big mistake in some cases, particularly if you play to a decent standard.

The best driving irons can help you to find more fairways, avoid disasters and produce lower scores. Finding the right “go-to” fairway-finding club is vital and it will give you great confidence, help you to relax and enjoy your game. For many golfers, the tee shot is the most daunting in golf and that feeling is exacerbated when facing a narrow fairway or a hole where trouble lurks on either side.

On those tee boxes, driver may well not be the right play. Even a fairway metal might be too much of a risk if you lack consistency with it. When you absolutely must find the fairway without sacrificing too much distance, the driving iron can be your saviour. Bearing this in mind, after testing a boat load of driving irons we have collated our top picks below, which are split into several different categories. 

We also recommend taking a look at our guides on the best golf hybrid clubs currently on the market or the best golf irons. We have also produced a guide on the best utility irons golf clubs too.

The Quick List

Most Forgiving Driving Iron

The most forgiving driving irons offer more margin for error for single figure players and higher handicappers who want more forgiveness in an iron style golf club.

Ping iCrossover Utility Iron

(Image credit: Future)

Specifications

Lofts: 18º, 20º, 22.5º
Shafts: PING Tour 2.0 Chrome 85, Mitsubishi Kai'Li White 80

Reasons to buy

+
New adjustable shaft creates options
+
Thinner sole more playable
+
Shorter shaft for control

Reasons to avoid

-
Large changes in lie angle when adjusting

The Ping iCrossover combines excellent forgiveness with superb visuals, making it one of the most functional clubs on this list. It is the latest in a long line of driving irons that started in 2016 with the G Crossover. Since then Ping have perfected their craft, producing hybrid driving irons to the point where we now have this exceptional offering that delivers superb playability, covering the gap between your longest iron and shortest hybrid. 

The iCrossover is more of an iron than a hybrid as the hollow head has a maraging steel face that is supported by an EVA polymer in the cavity that delivers an excellent sound and feel off the clubface. The sole is a little narrower than the Ping G425 Crossover below, meaning it plays a little more like an iron, cutting through the turf better on tighter lies. Overall the adjustability this club offers, combined with its excellent visuals, feel and sound means this club has several big improvements on the G425. 

TaylorMade Stealth DHY Utility Iron

The back of the 2022 TaylorMade Stealth DHY utility iron

(Image credit: Future)

Specifications

Loft : 2 4 (22º) and 5 (25º)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Diamana Limited 75

Reasons to buy

+
Supreme versatility
+
Delivers great distance

Reasons to avoid

-
Might be a little chunky for some

Joining TaylorMade's highly impressive 2022 Stealth range, the new Stealth DHY promises to pack a punch for a wide range of golfers thanks to several updates that have been made following the release of its predecessor, the SIM DHY. This is a very good looking club, with a slightly wider sole than the Stealth UDI, making it a little more forgiving. The black detailing gives it a nice, subtle edge, and it has a sleek profile at the address. 

Its updates are minimal but it definitely has a few improvements on the SIM, with TaylorMade altering the center of gravity of this club, to bring it much lower, allowing golfers to launch and flight the ball with ease. Thanks to the new ultra-thin 4140 forged face, the feedback on the club is softer than normal, delivering minimal noise akin to a standard golf iron. Distance-wise, we found it carried longer than the Stealth UDI and while both feature TaylorMade's Thru-Slot Speed Pocket, which helps to deliver optimal speed on the ball, the flight is slightly higher, something you should definitely keep in mind if you play a lot of links golf. Ultimately, this is one of the best driving irons on the market as it is a very forgiving club that can add more distance to your game.

Mizuno Pro Fli-Hi Utility Iron

Mizuno Pro Fli-Hi Utility Irons Review

(Image credit: MHopley)

Specifications

Lofts: 16.5°(2), 19°(3), 21.5°(4)
Shaft: Fujikura or Mizuno MFusion

Reasons to buy

+
Forgiving head
+
Easy to launch
+
Clean design

Reasons to avoid

-
Black looks may not appeal to all
-
Lacking forged feel

The Mizuno Pro Fli-Hi bridges the gap to the woods from the irons and is more of a distance club than a precision approach iron. The head is cast from 431 stainless steel and not forged. This allows a 21g tungsten weight to be placed in the sole of the club to drop the CG and improve the launch. 

At impact the feel was very good for a cast club and the internal ribs helped create a pleasing sound that will not disappoint, but is not quite the same as forged. It is equally at home from the tee and the fairway and is one of the better Fli-Hi style clubs that Mizuno has created in recent times.

Needless to say the other feature we liked was the black finish which we think some will like, some won't. The grey face and top line helps you align the club at address, but this color scheme might not appeal to blade purists and for many a chrome and brushed steel look would have been just as good.

Titleist U505 utility iron

Titleist U505 utility ironEditors Choice 2022

(Image credit: MHopley)

Specifications

Lofts: 16°(1), 18°(2), 20°(3), 22°(4)
Shaft: Project X HZRDUS Smoke Black graphite

Reasons to buy

+
Large head with offset hosel
+
Wide sole

Reasons to avoid

-
Looks more like wood than iron

The Titleist U505 driving iron features one of the larger heads in the category. Promoted as half iron, half hybrid it certainly lives up to that billing with a deep head and a degree of offset in the hosel to increase forgiveness. 

Internal tungsten weighting and a wide sole draws the CG back to ensure easy launch. It's not the cheapest driving iron out there, but it comes with a wide range or lofts and plenty of steel and graphite shaft options so you should get a specification that is worthy of the investment.

Best Value Driving Irons

Everyone likes a good deal with the best performance so here are the driving irons that we feel represent best value for money.

The back of the MacGregor V Foil Speed Driving Iron

(Image credit: Future)

Specifications

Lofts: 18­°(2), 21°(3)
Shafts: N/A

Reasons to buy

+
Forgiving on off-centre strikes
+
Great distance
+
Superb value for money

Reasons to avoid

-
Looks aren't the most striking

This MacGregor V-Foil Speed Driving Iron could be a serious option to add into your bag, with the blend of iron-like workability, control and forgiveness. It might not be the most striking to look at, however, the all black color with a dash of silver below the grip is certainly very smart.

In testing the distance off the tee was fantastic when cleanly struck. Even on off-centre strikes it still performed well, with the hollow body and expanded perimeter weighting coming into its own on shots that didn’t find the sweetspot. Importantly it also comes in at a very attractive price point as well.

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