Ping G425 Crossover Utility Iron Review

Ping G425 Crossover utility iron is one of the most forgiving driving irons for mid-handicappers

Ping G425 Crossover Utility Iron
(Image credit: MHopley)
Golf Monthly Verdict

Ping G425 Crossover utility iron is one of the few driving irons suited to low to mid-handicap players as it offers a high flight and plenty of forgiveness, combined with the accuracy of an iron.

Reasons to buy
  • +

    Easy to get going with high flight

  • +

    Forgiving face for its size

Reasons to avoid
  • -

    Functional looks

The Ping G425 Crossover utility iron is almost in a category of its own as it crosses the divide between irons and hybrids. There are many golfers out there who don’t like hitting woods and most long irons or better player utility irons are not forgiving enough. That is where the Ping G425 Crossover comes in as it is more of a hybrid wood in an iron body.

Like a wood, the hollow head has a maraging steel face insert, which is thinner and lighter in order to maximise the ball speed for more distance. The shape of the head is wider in the sole and this moves weight low and back to increase the launch and the combination of the two is what gives the G425 Crossover its distance.

Ping G425 Crossover Utility Iron

(Image credit: MHopley)

The head is not particularly long for this category of club and other models have wider heads, but the G425 Crossover is one of the most forgiving driving irons around. The forgiveness comes from the large tungsten weight screw in the toe and a smaller one in the hosel, which increases the MOI by 6.5% over the previous model.

There is a decent amount of offset in the hosel too which will also allow more time for the face to square and compared to other utility irons tested, the Ping G425 Crossover was the easiest to get airborne as a result.

Read our Guide to the Best Utility Irons

Ping G425 Crossover Utility Iron

(Image credit: MHopley)

This is one of the most forgiving long irons around and a joy to hit with a slightly higher pitched sound from the hollow head. The flight was higher than most, so this will suit single figure to mid handicappers who would still like a long iron in their bag. It is ideal from the tee and fairway and just about holds its own in light rough, where a hybrid like the Ping G425 hybrid will probably give you better results.

There is a good choice of lofts from 18°, 20° and 22.5°to ensure you get the right gapping in your bag and through Ping’s custom fitting service there is a good choice of four graphite shafts. On test we had the Ping Tour 85 shaft in silver which is light and stable and looks the part as an iron shaft with the silver finish.

Ping G425 Crossover Utility Iron

(Image credit: MHopley)

The only thing is that from most angles the G425 Crossover is not much of a looker, especially around the hosel area where the notch allows for easy lie adjustment to the cast head. 

To be fair it is better looking than some of the previous Crossover models. The design might be functional, but it does look good at address and the dark finish with the silver face creates a slimmed down profile. However, when it is sailing high and straight into the distance towards the flag you will care less about how it looks.

Martin Hopley is one of the foremost UK equipment reviewers with over 20 years' experience. As the former founder of Golfalot.com he was an early pioneer of online reviews and has also been a regular contributor to other titles. He is renowned for his technical knowledge and in-depth analysis, which he now brings to Golf Monthly.