Best Callaway Fairway Woods 2022

Check out the best Callaway fairway woods that are currently available on the market

Best Callaway Fairway Woods
(Image credit: Golf Monthly)

Best Callaway Fairway Woods

Callaway is one of the most highly respected golf brands in the business and, as such, it should come as no surprise it makes some of the best fairway woods (opens in new tab) on the market. 

These models don't just find their way into the bags of players on Tour though, but also higher handicap players too, with the company covering a wide range of skill levels and aspects. Whether you're looking for extra distance, workability, or better dispersion with your fairway woods, there's a model for you.

You don’t have to watch tour golf for too long before you’ll see Callaway’s very fast and eye-catching fairway woods on show. Major winners like Henrik Stenson, Jon Rahm and Georgia Hall have been using the brand for some time, with the trio regarded as some of the best ball strikers on the planet.

Bearing that in mind, we have taken a look at some of the best Callaway fairway woods available in the current range. Alternatively, if Callaway is not for you, we also recommend checking out our guides on the best Ping fairway woods (opens in new tab) or the best TaylorMade fairway woods (opens in new tab).

Best Callaway Fairway Woods

The bottom of the Callaway Rogue ST MAX FairwayEditors Choice 2022

(Image credit: Matthew Moore)
Fast and forgiving

Specifications

Lofts: 15°, 16.5°, 18°, 20°, 21°, 24°, 27°

Reasons to buy

+
Attractive premium looks
+
Offset face and slight draw bias for greater forgiveness
+
The highest ball speed of any fairway we’ve tested to date in 2022

Reasons to avoid

-
Speedometer graphics on crown aren’t needed

Callaway has released its Rogue ST Max Fairway to appeal to a wide range of golfers looking for distance, forgiveness and all-around performance. Available in 3-wood to 11-wood heads, it marks the largest selection in the brand's history.

One of three Rogue ST fairways, the trio of fairway woods replace the Mavrik range, with the ST standing for Speed Tuned, in reference to Callaway using A.I (artificial intelligence) to optimise its Flash Face designs for the best possible launch, spin and ball speed. There’s also a redeveloped Jailbreak system in the ST heads, where the dual ‘batwings’ have been pushed further out to the perimeter of the face, creating more face flex for better ball speeds, as well as making it one of the most forgiving fairway woods on the market.

The sound of the Rogue ST Max is rather deeper and muted compared to the metallic ting of the Mavrik which feels energetic and punchy. On test, the Rogue ST Max’s average ball speed was 152.7 mph, with a total average distance of 247.3 yards. Even better, dispersion and accuracy were outstanding, with the combination of length, accuracy and speed making the Rogue ST Max one of the most forgiving fairway woods (opens in new tab) on the market today.

The bottom of the Callaway Rogue ST MAX D

(Image credit: Matthew Moore)
Encourages a draw

Specifications

Lofts: 16°, 19°, 22°

Reasons to buy

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Classy compact matte black head
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Long and forgiving with excellent ball speeds
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Can counter balance a tendency to slice or cut the ball

Reasons to avoid

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The upright lie angle and closed face might not suit players who are shorter in height
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Non-adjustable head limits shaft and loft options

The second Rogue ST fairway wood is the Max D, which is one of the best fairway woods for high handicappers (opens in new tab) as it's the first wood from the brand that features a dedicated draw-bias.

Aimed at golfers looking to correct or neutralise a slice in their game, the ST Max D has a slightly closed face, as well as vertical and horizontal grooves with a more upright lie angle, this should help your swing overcome that slice that plagues so many golfers. 

Moving to the sole, which features a 27g Tungsten speed cartridge, as well as even more weight located toward the heel to create a high launching, powerful draw flight which, on testing, definitely showed.

The bottom of the Callaway Rogue ST LS Fairway

(Image credit: Matthew Moore)
Built for distance

Specifications

Lofts: 13.5°, 15°, 16.5°, 18°

Reasons to buy

+
Attractive premium looks
+
Improved sound and feel compared to Mavrik and Epic ranges
+
Built to favour a fade for accuracy

Reasons to avoid

-
Speedometer clock style graphics on crown aren’t necessary
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Higher spinning than we expected

The final fairway wood in the new Rogue ST range is the LS, which features the most compact head of the three options available. We also felt that the looks of the LS are the more traditional of three.

Within the fairway wood there’s lots of Callaway’s tried and tested technology at play, including a redeveloped Jailbreak ST system. The dual rods, or ‘batwings’, have also been pushed to the perimeter of the face, retaining stiffness while allowing more flexion for better ball speed.

In testing, it didn't disappoint, with the LS turning out to be one of the best performing fairway woods we tested when compared to other new 2022 releases such as the TaylorMade Stealth Plus (opens in new tab) and the Cobra LTDx fairway (opens in new tab)

Callaway Epic Speed three wood

(Image credit: Matthew Moore)
Fast off the face

Specifications

Lofts: 13.5°, 15°, 16.5°, 18°, 21°

Reasons to buy

+
Fast across the face with a strong ball flight

Reasons to avoid

-
No hosel adjustability but there are plenty of loft options to choose from

Launched to sit alongside the Mavrik model of fairway woods, the Epic 21 family has two heads, Max and Speed. The Epic Speed head is definitely the better option for those who want lower spin and a stronger ball flight thanks to the front positioned CG and penetrating ball flight.

Featuring Callaway’s Jailbreak A.I. Velocity Blades, the Epic Speed produces extremely fast ball speeds across the whole face, with a more forward Centre of Gravity and new leading-edge promoting a stronger ball flight and consistent shot shape dispersion.

The bottom of the Callaway Epic Max Fairway Wood

Callaway Epic Max Fairway Wood

Confidence building

Specifications

Lofts: 13.5°, 15°, 16.5°, 18°, 21°, 23°, 25°

Reasons to buy

+
Long, forgiving with a hint of draw-bias
+
Stretched out look inspires confidence

Reasons to avoid

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No hosel adjustability, but there are plenty of loft options to choose from

Aimed at those who want more forgiveness and a higher launch from their fairway wood, the Epic Max is designed to help the higher handicappers. This is thanks to centre of gravity which is further back.

Along with the centre of gravity, the Epic Max features an oversized head and shallow face, with the fairway wood sharing all the technology of the Epic Speed. We also see adjustability in the head of the club, with a 2g and 14g weight meaning you can find the right set-up for your game. 

Callaway Mavrik Sub Zero Fairway Wood

(Image credit: callaway mavrik sub zero fairway)
Deadly weapon

Specifications

Lofts: 13.5°, 15°, 16.5°, 18°, 21°

Reasons to buy

+
The slightly taller face makes this a lethal weapon off the tee

Reasons to avoid

-
Not as much forgiveness as its siblings

If you look into the Mavrik range you will find three different options - The Mavrik, Mavrik Max and the Mavrik Sub Zero. However, in this piece, it is the Sub Zero that we are most interested in, with our tests showing it was the best performer of the three.

Obviously other opinions may differ, but on testing we found the compact shape to be inviting to the eye, while the full-length white grooves highlight face alignment really effectively. 

When you strike a few shots with the Sub Zero, you instantly notice the hot, driver-like feel, especially out of the sweetspot. Not only that, but there is also a decent level of forgiveness on offer, especially if you have chosen to position the heavier weight at the rear.

Callaway Big Bertha B21 Fairway Wood

(Image credit: Golf Monthly)
High launch will be a big benefit

Specifications

Lofts: 15°, 18°, 21°, 24°

Reasons to buy

+
The high launch will benefit plenty of players

Reasons to avoid

-
The offset looks might take a bit of getting used to

The catchline with this club is ‘Distance Any Way You Swing It’ and it's clear to see why, with this offering from Callaway extremely easy to launch. What's more, the brand also claim that it's so easy to hit it feels like a hybrid. 

You’ll notice that the Big Bertha has a shallow face and a larger head. This provides plenty of distance and, to help us even more, a lighter crown provides even more forgiveness.

Otherwise, the usual Callaway details – the Artificial Intelligence, Flash Face and Jailbreak technology – are part of the process to deliver yet another strong and very helpful club.

How we test fairway woods

When it comes to Golf Monthly's testing procedure, we use the same ethos and methodology for all golf products to make sure they are as insightful, honest and comprehensive as possible.

When it comes to golf clubs, we usually attend product launches so we can meet with the manufacturer’s R&D experts to understand the new technology.

After we have an understanding here, our first port of call when hitting clubs is usually the indoor simulator at Foresight Sports, where the team can test in a controlled environment using premium balls and the GCQuad launch monitor. We also use TrackMan at golf facilities across the UK.

We then do outdoor testing, usually on ranges at West Hill Golf Club, Surrey, The Wynyard Club in Teesside and at Brancepeth Castle Golf Club in Durham. We then put the clubs into play out on these golf courses.

Specifically for fairway woods, product testing is headed up by Matthew Moore (opens in new tab), a 1-handicapper with many years of experience in the golf industry. He is ably assisted by technical editor Joel Tadman (opens in new tab), and digital editor Neil Tappin (opens in new tab).

All three have been testing clubs for many years, and can efficiently test the vast majority of the biggest product releases and convey the pros and cons eloquently.

What to consider when buying a fairway wood

Loft -  Figure out the specific gap to be filled in your golf bag. Ask yourself how far does my driver go, and how far do your longest irons or hybrids go? Knowing this will dictate the ideal loft for your fairway wood.

Forgiveness - Some fairway woods are more forgiving than others, especially because many manufacturers create different models for different levels of player. For example, there are four different Cobra LTDx fairways with different head sizes, shapes and they are designed for different golfers. If you need as much help as possible, the LTDx MAX (opens in new tab) will work for you, whilst if you are a better player and strike is more consistent, then forgiveness may not be a key factor for you.

Adjustability - Most modern fairway woods come with a degree of adjustability, whether that’s loft, moveable weights or shaft fittings. Think about how important adjustability is to you, because you can change the characteristics of a club’s performance with a turn of a wrench. Or, you can keep things simple and opt for a non-adjustable model with a stock shaft you hit well.

Versatility - Fairway woods must work well off the tee, on the ground from different lies and even around the green. If you have a model that works in only one of these areas, then there may be plenty of improvement and flexibility in upgrading your fairway woods.

Looks - You have to like how a golf club looks, especially when looking down on the golf ball. The fairway wood is one of the most difficult clubs to hit, which is why you need something that gives you confidence and may even spark a pang of jealousy in your playing partners. Our advice is go and pick several models, see how they look and feel in your hands and test them in a variety of situations and lies.

Budget - Be aware of your budget. You can go for more premium models, such as the TaylorMade Stealth Plus or Callaway Rogue ST LS (opens in new tab) or you can opt for cheaper designs like the Wilson Launch Pad. Wherever you fall in budget, our guides will present you with good advice on buying a new fairway wood.

How do you hit a fairway wood?

When it comes to hitting a fairway wood ball position is arguably the most important aspect. Many golfers will often have the ball too far back in the stance so there’s not enough loft at impact. With fairway woods, make sure you have the ball just inside your left heel, this will be far enough forward to help shallow out the angle of attack out a little.

The second thing is that you need a nice wide base, so your stance should be shoulder-width or a fraction more. Too narrow here and you’re going to get too much weight towards the left foot. Your weight distribution at address should be evenly balanced between your feet – think 50/50.

For further advice on the best way to hit a fairway wood (opens in new tab), check out our guide here.