Patrick Reed Golf Swing Analysis

We take a look at the finer details as there are some interesting quirks well worth exploring.

Patrick Reed golf swing analysis
(Image credit: Getty Images)

In this Patrick Reed golf swing analysis, we take a look at the finer details as there are some interesting quirks well worth exploring.

Patrick Reed Golf Swing Analysis

Patrick Reed won the US Masters by a single stroke in what was billed as one of the most competitive Masters in history.

His long game has been imperious at Augusta, and coupled with a razor sharp short game, he could not be beaten

In this Patrick Reed golf swing analysis, we take a look at the finer details as there are some interesting quirks well worth exploring.

Patrick Reed Golf Swing Analysis

Ready for a draw

You will notice in this Patrick Reed golf swing analysis that he often addresses the ball slightly closed. Reed is a right-to-left, draw ball-flight player and he will set up for that shot-shape more often than not. It is fair to say that, whilst you do need to be able to hit the ball both ways, Augusta National slightly favours right-handers with a natural right-to-left shot shape (or left-handers with a natural fade).

Pause at the top

There are two things about his transition from backswing to downswing that mark Patrick Reed out. The first is the pause. Reed makes a full and powerful upper body rotation to reach the top and then his swing stops for a nanosecond. It is a small pause but it is noticeable. This ensures that the beginning of the downswing stays smooth even when the pressure starts to mount. For many golfers, pressure causes the swing to speed up and the transition to be rushed. The result is that the arms and body stop working in synchronisation and accuracy is lost. As the pressure of the US Masters mounts over the weekend, it will be interesting to see if this pause remains in Patrick Reed’s swing.

Patrick Reed golf swing analysis

Shallowing out

The other key move in this Patrick Reed golf swing analysis is the shallowing out of the club at the very start of the downswing. There is a slight change in the angle of the shaft on the way down that allows the club to attack the ball from inside the ball-to-target line. Again, this is the move of a draw player.

Patrick Reed golf swing analysis

At the top of the backswing reed's club is pointing almost straight up here. As he starts down, the club shaft shallows out - denoted by the yellow line.

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Footwork

The most idiosyncratic move in Reed’s swing is his footwork. As he drives through impact his left toe moves aggressively towards the target (you will see that move more clearly when he hits his driver) but, crucially, his right heel stays almost planted to the ground at the moment of contact. It is an unusual move that stems from the way his upper body remains over his hips during the swing (there is not as much lateral weight shift in this swing as you would see elsewhere). This particular move makes him a great wedge player – he is ranked 6th on the PGA Tour for shots between 125 and 150 yards.

Patrick Reed golf swing analysis

Ever since he turned professional in 2011, Patrick Reed has been one to watch. With five PGA Tour victories and a Ryder Cup winning performance at Hazeltine to his name, the Texan is more than capable of winning a major championship. As you can see from this Patrick Reed golf swing analysis, he has the technique and the firepower to do it. The big unknown at this stage is whether he can handle the pressure.

Watch this space.

Neil Tappin
Digital Editor

In his current role, Neil is responsible for testing drivers and golf balls. Having been a part of the Golf Monthly team for over 15 years and playing off a handicap of 3, he has the experience to compare performance between models, brands and generations. For 2022 he thinks the main trend in drivers is: "In a word, consistency. Whilst all the brands are talking about ball speed (and the new drivers are certainly long), my biggest finding has been how much more consistent the ball flights are. Mishits don't seem to be causing the same level of drop-off or increase in the spin numbers. This means that more shots seem to be flying the way you want them to!" As far as golf balls are concerned the biggest development is in the, "three piece, non-Tour, urethane-covered section. For regular golfers, these models offer superb performance at both ends of the bag without denting your wallet quite as much as the premium Tour-played options."


Originally working with the best coaches in the UK to produce instruction content, he is now the brand's Digital Editor and covers everything from Tour player interviews to gear reviews. In his time at Golf Monthly, he has covered equipment launches that date back well over a decade. He clearly remembers the launch of the Callaway and Nike square drivers as well as the white TaylorMade driver families, such as the RocketBallz! If you take a look at the Golf Monthly YouTube channel, you'll see his equipment videos dating back over a decade! He has also conducted 'What's In The Bag' interviews with many of the game's best players like Rory McIlroy, Dustin Johnson and Jon Rahm. Over the years, Neil has tested a vast array of products in each category and at drastically different price-points. 

Neil is currently playing: Driver: TaylorMade Stealth Plus Fairway Wood: Titleist TSR2 Hybrid: Titleist TS3 Irons (4-9): Mizuno JPX 919 Forged Wedges: Titleist Vokey SM7 46˚, 50˚, 54˚, 60˚ Putter: Odyssey Triple Track Ten Ball: Titleist Pro V1X