TomTom Golfer GPS Watch

The TomTom Golfer displays hazard, dogleg and lay up distances but did it impress our tester?

TomTom Golfer
The new TomTom Golfer GPS watch
Golf Monthly Verdict

The TomTom Golfer was a device we wanted to like more than we did. The TomTom brand is known for its accurate navigation technology and the Golfer watch delivered on that front. The setting up process was worthwhile in the end and the abundance of information came in useful when forming strategy on tee shots.

Reasons to buy
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    As you'd expect from an expert in navigation, the distances displayed were very accurate. It was comfortable to wear and provides a wealth of information to help you plot your way around the course and hit more accurate approach shots.

Reasons to avoid
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    Having to download TomTom software to your computer before you can use it

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    is time consuming. You can’t turn it off when it’s not in use and there’s no shot- measurement function.

Golf Monthly's TomTom Golfer review, a GPS watch with a unique navigation system that provides distances to hazards, corners of doglegs and hazards

Key technology As well as your usual front, middle and back distances, the TomTom GPS watch displays distances to hazards, dogleg and lay-up yardages, plus any spots you’ll need to avoid around the green, such as bunkers and ponds. A database of more than 40,000 global courses can be updated wirelessly via a smartphone app. Other features include a digital scorecard, a round timer and a scratch-resistant display.

GM Review A very stylish piece of kit, the TomTom watch is light (53g) with a slimline fit on your wrist. Distances are clear, and using the secondary navigation unit underneath the screen works well and is simple to use.

There’s a plethora of useful information on offer, most of which is easy to access and interpret. Being able to pair your device to your smartphone to receive course updates wirelessly is a real plus. It’s comfortable on your wrist and easy to fasten securely too.

The abundance of information is great, but it could be displayed in a manner that is simpler to take in. It’s easy to navigate and basic distances themselves are easy to read. It’s also very comfy on your wrist and seemed to be as accurate as any other watch on the market.

NEXT: GPS and laser rangefinders of 2016

Joel Tadman
Technical Editor

Joel has worked in the golf industry for over 12 years covering both instruction and more recently equipment. He now oversees all product content here at Golf Monthly, managing a team of talented and passionate writers and presenters in delivering the most thorough and accurate reviews, buying advice, comparisons and deals to help the reader find exactly what they are looking for. So whether it's the latest driver, irons, putter or laser rangefinder, Joel has his finger on the pulse keeping up to date with the latest releases in golf. He is also responsible for all content on irons and golf tech, including distance measuring devices and launch monitors.


One of his career highlights came when covering the 2012 Masters he got to play the sacred Augusta National course on the Monday after the tournament concluded, shooting a respectable 87 with just one par and four birdies. To date, his best ever round of golf is a 5-under 67 back in 2011. He currently plays his golf at Burghley Park Golf Club in Stamford, Lincs, with a handicap index of 3.8.


Joel's current What's In The Bag? 

Driver: Titleist TSR3, 9° 

Fairway wood: Titleist TSR3, 15° 

Hybrid: Titleist TSi2, 18° 

Irons: TaylorMade P770, 4-7 iron, TaylorMade P7MC 8-PW 

Wedges: Titleist Vokey SM8, 50°, 54° and a Titleist Vokey SM9 60° lob wedge 

Putter: Evnroll ER2V 

Ball: 2021 Titleist Pro V1x