Quiz! Can You Name Every Ryder Cup Venue Since 1980?

In the 20 Ryder Cups held since 1980, there have been 17 different host venues. Can you name them all?

Ryder Cup venue
Can you name every Ryder Cup venue since 1980?
(Image credit: Getty Images)

In this quiz we ask you to name every host venue for the Ryder Cup since 1980. You have three minutes to get all 17 of them. If it’s too easy, try naming every winner of The Masters since it was first played in 1934. But for now, have a go at those Ryder Cup venues:

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The Ryder Cup is a biennial team event contested between the top male golfers from the USA and the continent of Europe. It has become one of the most exciting, tense and competitive events on the world sporting calendar.

First contested officially in 1927, the Ryder Cup rose to prominence, largely because of the efforts of a 68-year-old seed merchant called Samuel Ryder. A former mayor of St Albans, Ryder took it upon himself to develop a team competition between professional golfers from Britain and America. He commissioned Mappin & Webb of Mayfair to build a trophy, the cost of which was split: Ryder paid £100, Golf Illustrated paid £100 and the Royal and Ancient Golf Club put in £50. 19 inches high and solid gold, the figure on top is modelled on Ryder’s instructor Abe Mitchell. 

The USA won the first contest at Worcester Country Club in Massachusetts and after 43 matches held to this point, the USA leads the series by 27 matches to 14 (with two ties – 1969 when the USA retained, and 1989 when Europe retained).

Last time out, (we won’t give the venue away,) team USA were comprehensive winners, triumphing by 19 points to 9.

Fergus Bisset
Fergus Bisset

Fergus is a golf obsessive and 1-handicapper. Growing up in the North East of Scotland, golf runs through his veins and it was concentrated by his time at St Andrews university studying history. He went on to earn a post graduate diploma from the London School of Journalism. Fergus has worked for Golf Monthly since 2004 and has written two books on the game; "Great Golf Debates" together with Jezz Ellwood of Golf Monthly and "The Ultimate Golf Book" together with Neil Tappin (also of Golf Monthly)... Fergus once shanked a ball from just over Granny Clark's Wynd on the 18th of the Old Course that struck the St Andrews Golf Club and rebounded into the Valley of Sin, from where he saved par. Who says there's no golfing god?