TaylorMade Spider GT Rollback Putter Review

TaylorMade Spider GT Rollback blends classic mallet shape with more forgiveness

TaylorMade Spider GT Rollback Putter Review
(Image credit: MHopley)
Golf Monthly Verdict

A model used by Collin Morikawa, the Rollback putter from TaylorMade is ideal for those players looking for a generous mallet with solid alignment and forgiveness on off-centre hits. The lightness may take a bit of time to get used to, but this is only a minor point.

Reasons to buy
  • +

    Generous head size

  • +

    Good alignment lines

  • +

    Forgiving on off-centre hits

Reasons to avoid
  • -

    Feels lighter than other GT models

TaylorMade Spider GT Rollback Putter Review

The TaylorMade Spider GT Rollback putter harks back to the looks of the mallets of yesteryear such as the John Letters Silver Swan or the Ram Zebra. However now it has a lot more technology involved as it is based on the Spider GT platform.

Like our TaylorMade Spider GT putter review, the GT Rollback uses a lightweight 232g anodised 6061 aluminium cap combined with an 80 gram tungsten ‘Stability Roll Bar’ around the rear of the head.

TaylorMade Spider GT Rollback Putter

(Image credit: MHopley)

The aim of this is to move the centre of gravity back to create more forgiveness as it will be harder for the face to twist offline if you don’t strike it in the middle. This creates a deep rounded head with a long wide alignment line that is either white on black as shown here, or three black lines on a silver background.

TaylorMade Spider GT Rollback Putter

(Image credit: MHopley)

It is quite a low tech design but the visuals do work well, especially the version with the white line on the black background which is not quite as wide as a golf ball. At address the putter does want to sit back on its tungsten weighted rear and so your hands will need to take control of it by the SuperStroke Pistol GTR 1.0 grip. With the weight being around the back there is not as much stability support through the stroke as the other mallet in the range, the TaylorMade Spider GT Notchback putter.

TaylorMade Spider GT Rollback Putter

(Image credit: MHopley)

The sole has a cambered heel and toe section either side of the central section reminiscent of the Bobby Grace Fat Lady Swings putter. This is good as your hands can vary the lie a little from the standard 70° on the Rollback.

The PureRoll 2 face insert has 3° of loft and features a firmer black TPU with aluminium bars at a 45° angle to improve the roll of the ball. It’s a slightly firmer version of the previous PureRoll insert from the TaylorMade Spider X putter and it enhances the sound and feel more with a firmer feedback, which will be useful if you like using a soft golf ball. Compare to the other GT models it did sound a pitch higher, probably due to where the heavier weights are positioned.

TaylorMade Spider GT Rollback Putter

(Image credit: MHopley)

The Fluted Feel steel shaft has a softer section 5cm above the hosel to improve the consistency of the stroke and the ball roll. If it works then it is pretty subtle but the feel is good. There is a choice of single bend hosel for a face balanced head or small slant for a 21° toe hang to suit your stroke preference.

In some ways it is nice to see this classic shape and style back in the form of the TaylorMade (opens in new tab) Spider GT Rollback putter. It is a high tech version of this mallet style that uses of the different materials like tungsten, even if this tech is not as visual as other models in the Spider GT family. The head is the same weight as the other Spider GT putters, but it seems to play a little lighter and may appeal more to those who need more forgiveness from a simple and clean design of a mallet putter. (opens in new tab)

Martin Hopley
Martin Hopley

Martin Hopley is one of the foremost UK equipment reviewers with over 20 years' experience. As the former founder of Golfalot.com he was an early pioneer of online reviews and has also been a regular contributor to other titles. He is renowned for his technical knowledge and in-depth analysis, which he now brings to Golf Monthly.