Royal Liverpool Golf Club Course Review

Exciting changes at this historic links will see it in tip-top shape when The Open Championship returns in 2023.

Royal Liverpool Golf Club Course Review
Incredible new 15th hole at Hoylake
(Image credit: Sam Cooper)

Host to The Open Championship on 12 occasions, Royal Liverpool or Hoylake is one of the most historic clubs and courses in the country.

Royal Liverpool Golf Club Course Review

Top 100 Ranking 2021/22 - 12

Previous Rankings

2019/20 – 14 2017/18 - 14 2015/16 - 12 2013/14 - 15 2011/12 - 13 2009/10 - 13

Summer Green Fees

Round - £220wd, £250we

Visitors: Further information available on club website

Medal Tee: Par 72 – 6,907 Yards

royal-liverpool-golf.com (opens in new tab)

Changes since previous ranking

Significant work with The Open Championship of 2023 in mind, in collaboration with The R&A and Martin Ebert. Work includes the construction of a full new par-3 15th, that will play as the 17th hole in The Open.

Also changes to further greens, tees, bunkers, hollows and mounding around the course.

Royal Liverpool Golf Club Course Review

Playing host to The Open Championship of 2023, significant course improvements see Royal Liverpool move up two places from the last ranking to Number 12.

Built in 1869, on what was then the racecourse of the Liverpool Hunt Club, Hoylake is the second oldest of the English seaside courses, after Westward Ho!

The club has played host to The Open Championship on 12 occasions with recent winners Rory McIlroy and Tiger Woods demonstrating the quality of golf demanded by this excellent course.

At the tip of the Wirral peninsula and set on fairly flat ground, it’s a superb layout with beautiful greens and wonderful natural contours. Always maintained in immaculate condition, there are some uniquely memorable golf holes to experience at Hoylake. It’s a course where emphasis is placed on strong driving and tee shots must be threaded between punishing bunkering.

(Image credit: Getty Images)

Related: Top 100 golf courses UK and Ireland

Major works have been undertaken in preparation for July 2023, with advice from course architect Martin Ebert and overseen by Royal Liverpool’s experienced Course Manager Craig Gilholm.

The par-5 3rd

Special note should be made of the newly designed par-3 15th. The design is imaginative, original and a little different in look compared to the rest of the course. The natural grass and sandy areas combine wonderfully with the raised green turned toward the coast. The bunkering is well thought out and the drop off areas quite punishing. It’s a great addition.

Royal Liverpool Golf Club Course Review

Incredible new 15th hole at Hoylake
(Image credit: Sam Cooper)

Assessor Feedback

Playing any championship course allows you to test your ability against what the best in the world experience and Hoylake is a true example of this. The opening few holes ease you into the round although good shots are still required.

Once into the heart of the round all aspects of your game will be tested, and you will need all of them to be working to score well. Accuracy is key throughout especially as you reach the back nine. Subtle run-off areas around the greens can cost you shots. Overall, the club has a friendly and vibrant feel and is a treat to visit.

Royal Liverpool Golf Club Course Review

11th at Hoylake
(Image credit: Kevin Murray)

GM Verdict

Exciting changes at this historic links will see it in tip-top shape when The Open Championship returns in 2023.

Fergus is a golf obsessive and 1-handicapper. Growing up in the North East of Scotland, golf runs through his veins and it was concentrated by his time at St Andrews university studying history. He went on to earn a post graduate diploma from the London School of Journalism. Fergus has worked for Golf Monthly since 2004 and has written two books on the game; "Great Golf Debates" together with Jezz Ellwood of Golf Monthly and "The Ultimate Golf Book" together with Neil Tappin (also of Golf Monthly)... Fergus once shanked a ball from just over Granny Clark's Wynd on the 18th of the Old Course that struck the St Andrews Golf Club and rebounded into the Valley of Sin, from where he saved par. Who says there's no golfing god?