Callaway Rogue ST Pro Iron Review

Our Callaway Rogue ST Pro Iron Review highlights the pros and cons of this exciting new players' distance model

Callaway Rogue ST Pro Iron review
(Image credit: Future)
Golf Monthly Verdict

If you’re a decent player looking for a bit more speed but still want to shape the ball, the Rogue ST Pro could be your perfect match. It looks great behind the ball and in the bag, providing a compact yet inviting aesthetic. Some may want a softer feel, but the lively sensation at impact will have you coming back for more.

Reasons to buy
  • +

    Stunning looks

  • +

    Forgiving off centre

  • +

    Stable ball flight

Reasons to avoid
  • -

    Some may want a softer feel

Callaway Rogue ST Pro Iron Review

Watch Joel Tadman test out the Callaway Rogue ST Pro iron

Callaway’s new entry in the players’ distance irons space is the Rogue ST Pro, by far the most compact iron in the new Rogue ST range targeting the low-to-mid single digit golfer by offering a thin topline and reduced offset on a head packed full of performance-enhancing technology.

The Rogue ST Pro is unquestionably one of the best looking irons on the market. It has the appearance of a muscleback in the bag and down at address strikes the perfect balance of looking easy to hit, without coming across as bulky - like the other new irons in the Rogue ST family. This shiny finish won’t suit everyone’s eye but some will argue it further bolsters the premium appeal.

Callaway Rogue ST Pro Iron address

(Image credit: Future)

Our first impression clipping a few shots away is that the feel is lively and consistent but the sound is still relatively clicky and metallic. Callaway has extended the area in contact with the urethane microspheres up to the sixth groove but it still doesn’t feel as soft as other irons in this category. That said, the blend of speed and stability helped us achieve consistently long carry distances.

The 7-iron loft is 30.5°, comparable with many of it’s competitors like the TaylorMade P790 and the Ping i525 iron and the distance we achieved was similar - averaging just under 170 yards but often exceeding it on shots out of the sweetspot. The flight was a touch on the low side but it didn’t seem to effect the stopping power significantly, which meant we had good control over the ball flight when hitting into a crosswind. This was helped by the face there is a decent amount of workability on offer, which will please lower handicappers looking for a compact iron that enables them to shape the ball when they need to.

The 48g of tungsten really helps to keep ball speed up on mishits and stabilise the face when you don’t quite catch the ball centrally - we enjoyed how straight the ball flight was shot after shot and how misses weren’t penalised unless you made a really bad swing. Coming in at £849 for a set, there’s more than enough value for money on offer here.

Joel Tadman
Joel Tadman

Joel has worked in the golf industry for over 12 years covering both instruction and more recently equipment. He now oversees all product content here at Golf Monthly, managing a team of talented and passionate writers and presenters in delivering the most thorough and accurate reviews, buying advice, comparisons and deals to help the reader find exactly what they are looking for. So whether it's the latest driver, irons, putter or laser rangefinder, Joel has his finger on the pulse keeping up to date with the latest releases in golf. He is also responsible for all content on irons and golf tech, including distance measuring devices and launch monitors.


During these enjoyable years he has had some money-can't-buy experiences, like interviewing Tiger Woods and Rory McIlroy one-on-one and covering the 2010 Ryder Cup at Celtic Manor. 


One of his career highlights came when covering the 2012 Masters he got to play the sacred Augusta National course on the Monday after the tournament concluded, shooting a respectable 87 with just one par and four birdies. To date, his best ever round of golf is a 5-under 67 back in 2011. He currently plays his golf at Burghley Park Golf Club in Stamford, Lincs, with a handicap index of 4.7.


Joel's current What's In The Bag? 

Driver: TaylorMade SIM2, 9° 

Fairway wood: Titleist TSi3, 15° 

Hybrid: Titleist TSi2, 18° 

Irons: TaylorMade P770, 4-PW 

Wedges: Titleist Vokey SM8, 50°, 54° and 58° 

Putter: Evnroll ER2V 

Ball: 2021 Titleist Pro V1x