Srixon Z-Star Divide Golf Ball 2023 Review

Srixon Z-Star Divide Golf Ball 2023 brings you both sides of the colour divide

Srixon Z-Star Divide Golf Ball 2023
(Image credit: MHopley)
Golf Monthly Verdict

Srixon Z-Star Divide golf ball 2023 ball offer all the performance benefits of the Z-Star with a twist. The two colour design creates multiple options for aligning the ball towards the target or parallel to the club face. As alignment patterns go, this simple design is one of the best.

Reasons to buy
  • +

    Divide colour design creates different alignment options

  • +

    Premium ball performance

  • +

    Easy to see in flight and find

Reasons to avoid
  • -

    Would prefer logo across Divide line to allow plain white/yellow view option too

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The Srixon Z-Star Divide golf ball 2023 may help those of you who sit across the divide of whether golf balls should be white or yellow. Underneath it all, it is a standard Z-Star so you can read more in my Srixon Z-Star golf ball review.

Srixon Z-Star Divide Golf Ball 2023 Box

(Image credit: MHopley)

The Z-Star Divide comes with a 3-piece construction that features a 92 compression FastLayer DG core that gets progressively firmer as you move from the centre to the outer layers. This is what gives the Divide its performance with the softer centre controlling spin and the firmer exterior delivering the speed.

Srixon Z-Star Divide Golf Ball 2023

(Image credit: MHopley)

Aimed at players swinging 90mph or more with the driver, the Z-Star Divides 10% lower compression than the Z-Star XV means that it performs better with the irons as the cover can get more into the grooves so the club and grip the ball.

Key to this is the revised Spin Skin+ coating on the 0.5mm urethane cover that you see on the best premium golf balls. This aims to deliver more control and make the ball more aerodynamic so that it stays straighter in the wind and the Divide does perform well in this respect.

However unlike all the other Srixon golf balls in the Z-Star range, the Divide is all about the look. The white and yellow halves of the ball have the colour impregnated into the core and then the two halves are joined together. The cover has a slight matte look to it, but the feel is almost the same as the standard Z-Star.

Srixon Z-Star Divide Golf Ball 2023

(Image credit: MHopley )

There are many ways to use the Divide and putting is the obvious one. You can align the Divide colour line to the target or parallel to the face depending on which one you prefer. If you don’t like to see the line then switch the ball to the all yellow or all white side. It is a bit more subtle than drawing a line on it and the fact half of the ball is one colour means that you can see how the ball is rolling from a distance to get feedback on your strike.

Srixon Z-Star Divide Golf Ball 2023

(Image credit: MHopley)

I was also using it on tee shots to try and promote an inside attach by pointing the line to the right and then swinging my driver on that path. On other tee shots I would line the divide parallel to the face as irons have a shallower, cleaner top line than things like putters that can have long alignment lines.

Srixon Z-Star Divide Golf Ball 2023

(Image credit: MHopley)

Srixon claim there can be a strobe effect on full shots as the colours rotate, but my eyesight must be missing that. It does however seem easier to see in the sky as it appears darker than a white ball and also the two-tone appearance was easy to find in the rough too. But with a ball that can point you in the right direction, you will be in the fairway anyway, right…?

Martin Hopley

Martin Hopley is one of the foremost UK equipment reviewers with over 20 years' experience. As the former founder of Golfalot.com he was an early pioneer of online reviews and has also been a regular contributor to other titles. He is renowned for his technical knowledge and in-depth analysis, which he now brings to Golf Monthly.