Nobull Lightweight Textured Polo Shirt Review

In this Nobull Lightweight Textured polo shirt review, Mike Harris discusses the brand's plans for golf - and offers his verdict on its camo polo

Nobull Lightweight Textured Polo Shirt Review
(Image credit: Future)
Golf Monthly Verdict

As well as offering a distinctive look with an on trend camo pattern, this premium Nobull polo shirt is extremely comfortable to wear thanks to a high quality performance fabric that is among the very best on the market.

Reasons to buy
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    Exceptionally comfortable

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    Premium look and feel

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    Suitable to wear on and off the course

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    Something different from a non traditional golf brand

Reasons to avoid
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    Camo styling won’t appeal to everyone

Unless you’re into the sport of CrossFit it’s likely you won’t have heard of Nobull. The brand was founded in 2015 by Reebok veterans Marcus Wilson and Michael Schaeffer and it has been building an immensely loyal following in CrossFit, and is the title sponsor of the CrossFit Games – which is like the Olympics for its sport. In recent years it has been expanding its offering into sports like running, cycling, swimming and now golf.

On the PGA Tour, American pro Scott Stallings (above) has been wearing the brand’s Matryx golf shoes and apparel, and Nobull was recently announced as the official training apparel and footwear of the PGA Tour so it seems safe to say the brand sees golf as a focus going forwards.

The camo polo is currently the only golf specific apparel item in the range but if you want to get into a brand that’s going to be more well known this year and beyond, now’s the time to check out Nobull.

How tall am I/what is my build?
5ft 8.5 inches, medium build.

What do I normally wear – does it come up big/small?
Medium, so long as not too fitted. However, as per the brand’s advice, I would agree that it’s necessary to go up a size with the polo, especially if you’re between sizes as it is a tailored fit. It comes in four different sizes: small, medium, large and extra large.

How did it fit/feel/perform?
I’ve worn a lot of different golf polo shirts over the years and seen fabrics (and fits) change over time, from relaxed cotton to the now dominant man made 'performance' materials often in a more athletic cut.

Performance fabrics have a lot going for them. They’re easy care, wick away sweat on hot days and have the ability to stay odour free. However, the trade off is often in feel and fit. Performance fabric polo shirts seem to are either be quite coarse with a very man made feel, or they’re shiny and clingy. 

The texture of the Nobull polo is different as it manages to offer an almost cotton like soft feel but with all the benefits of performance fabric. The seams are constructed to not rub and chafe (a not uncommon issue with performance fabrics) and I’ve certainly had no issues to date. 

Nobull Lightweight Textured Polo Shirt Review

(Image credit: Future)

Any extra details you notice?
The reflective Nobull branding on the chest is a nice touch, as is Nobull’s subtle 'horns' on the rear of the neck – which is the 'U' from Nobull. I also liked the buttons, which have a nice rubberised feel, whilst construction around the collar also has a stylish look and feel.

Can you wear it off the course?
Yes, and I do. Admittedly, I’m into camo styling. However, I’m not the only one who feels this is a style very much on trend. There are five colours to choose from in the camo style: black, army, white, navy and slate – and they’ll all look smart on and off the golf course.

How does it come out after the wash/do you need to iron it?
Just wash it, dry it, and pop it on a hanger. It’s quick to dry and it’s not necessary to give it an iron. Don’t worry about the collar curling – this isn’t going to be an issue, as it can sometimes be with polo shirts.

Mike Harris
Mike Harris

Mike has been a journalist all his working life, starting out as a football writer with Goal magazine in the 1990s before moving into men’s and women’s lifestyle magazines including Men's Health, In 2003 he joined Golf Monthly and in 2006 he became only the eighth editor in Golf Monthly’s 100-plus year history. His two main passions in golf are courses, having played over 400 courses worldwide, and shoes; he owns over 40 pairs.

Mike’s handicap index hovers at around 10 and he is a member of four clubs: Hartley Wintney, Royal Liverpool, Royal North Devon and the Royal & Ancient Golf Club of St Andrews.