RBC Canadian Open Purse And Prize Money

The tournament returns to the PGA Tour for the first time since 2019, and there's an increased purse to play for

Rory McIlroy poses with the trophy after winning the 2019 RBC Canadian Open
(Image credit: Getty Images)

The RBC Canadian Open returns to the PGA Tour schedule for the first time since 2019 after Covid-related restrictions thwarted plans to stage it in 2020 and 2021.

Three years ago, Rory McIlroy shot 61 as he cruised to victory, finishing seven shots ahead of runners-up Shane Lowry and Webb Simpson to claim the $1.36m first prize from a purse of $7.6m. The Northern Irishman will be back to defend his title this year as part of a strong field including World No.1 Scottie Scheffler, PGA Champion Justin Thomas, Players Champion Cameron Smith and Sam Burns, who has two PGA Tour wins in 2022 so far, including the recent Charles Schwab Challenge.

McIlroy’s win in 2019 came at Hamilton, but if he’s to successfully defend his title, he’ll have to do it at a different venue – St George’s. The course first hosted the Canadian Open in 1933, but it’s only been the venue for the tournament a handful of times, most recently in 2010. That’s largely thanks to the tricky logistics of its location in a densely populated neighbourhood of Toronto.

Not that you’d know the course was so close to city life once you’re on it. Undulating greens and picturesque, winding fairways abound. Meanwhile, highlighting its rare beauty, the course also has sanctuary status, having been designated as a Certified Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary in 2010.

Whoever wins the tournament will have to reckon with four of the toughest finishing holes they'll find anywhere. The long 15th features a hilltop green. Next, the par 3 16th has rear bunkers at the back of the green, meaning accuracy is crucial. The par 4 17th has a narrow green and bunkers to challenge any level of golfer. Finally, the 18th par 4 is uphill all the way, with a sloping green surrounded by bunkers against the backdrop of the stately and historic clubhouse. 

As well as the memorable venue and strong field, there is also a sizeable tournament purse, with the overall prize money increasing to $8.7m. The player who wins the tournament will earn $1.56m. Usually the PGA Tour would offer the largest prize money of the week by some way but not this week. That's because of the opening LIV Golf Invitational Series tournament taking place at London's Centurion Club at the same time, with a huge $25m prize money up for grabs.

The full tournament prize money breakdown is below.

2022 RBC Canadian Open Prize Money

PositionPrize Money
1st$1,566,000
2nd$948,300
3rd$600,300
4th$426,300
5th$356,700
6th$315,375
7th$293,625
8th$271,875
9th$254,475
10th$237,075
11th$219,675
12th$202,275
13th$184,875
14th$167,475
15th$158,775
16th$150,075
17th$141,375
18th$132,675
19th$123,975
20th$115,275
21st$106,575
22nd$97,875
23rd$90,915
24th$83,955
25th$76,995
26th$70,035
27th$67,425
28th$64,815
29th$62,205
30th$59,595
31st$56,985
32nd$54,375
33rd$51,765
34th$49,590
35th$47,415
36th$45,240
37th$43,065
38th$41,325
39th$39,585
40th$37,845
41st$36,105
42nd$34,365
43rd$32,625
44th$30,885
45th$29,145
46th$27,405
47th$25,665
48th$24,273
49th$23,055
50th$22,359
51st$21,837
52nd$21,315
53rd$20,967
54th$20,619
55th$20,445
56th$20,271
57th$20,097
58th$19,923
59th$19,749
60th$19,575
61st$19,401
62nd$19,227
63rd$19,053
64th$18,879
65th$18,705

Where Is The RBC Canadian Open This Year?

The  Canadian Open will be held at St George's in Toronto. The course previously held the tournament five times between 1933 and 2010. St George's has also hosted five Canadian Women’s Opens and was the venue for the golf tournament in the 2017 Invictus Games. 

How Much Is The Purse For The 2022 RBC Canadian Open?

The purse for the 2022 RBC Canadian Open is $8.7m. That is an increase of $1.6m from the last time the tournament was held, in 2019. Covid-related restrictions meant the tournament was cancelled in  2020 and 2021. 

Mike Hall
Mike Hall

Mike has 25 years of experience in journalism, including writing on sports such as golf, football and cricket. Now a freelance writer for Golf Monthly, he is dedicated to covering the sport’s most newsworthy stories. Originally from East Yorkshire, Mike now resides in Canada, where the nearest course is less than a mile from his home. It’s there where he remains confident that, one of these days, he’ll play the 17th without finding the water. Kevin Cook’s acclaimed 2007 biography, Tommy’s Honour, about golf’s founding father and son, remains one of his all-time favourite sports books.