A tough strategic links test with a selection of highly memorable holes and a fine history. There’s an interesting juxtaposition of nature and urbanity to be seen on the fairways.

Royal Lytham and St Annes Golf Club Course Review

Top 100 Ranking 2021/22 – 13

Previous Rankings

2019/20 – 12
2017/18 – 11
2015/16 – 9
2013/14 – 7
2011/12 – 10
2009/10 – 10

Summer Green Fees

£115 – £260

Visitors: Monday and Thursday are the Club’s main visitor days, but there are times available in the late afternoon on other days

Medal Tee: Par 71 – 6,731 Yards

royallytham.org

Changes since previous ranking

No changes advised

VIDEO: The Average Golfer Visits Royal Lytham and St Annes –

Royal Lytham and St Annes Golf Club Course Review

A drop of one place for this iconic Lancashire links, with no major works reported since last ranking.

Although surrounded by urbanisation, and some distance from the sea, Lytham is a true links, famous for its punishing pot bunkers and magnetic swathes of gorse.

The 17th at Royal Lytham

Originally designed by the club’s first professional George Lowe, the course has changed little since Harry Colt was employed to oversee alterations to the layout in 1919. The routing has stood the test of time and consistently been proved to deliver one of the finest tests of golf in the British Isles

Royal Lytham and St Annes Golf Club Course Review

Lytham is a course where accuracy is key, and placement from the tee essential. When the wind blows from the Irish Sea, the examination can be formidable.

Royal Lytham and St Annes Golf Club Course Review

Unusually, Lytham opens with a par 3. At 206 yards it’s an uncompromising beginning and, for the majority of golfers, bogey is a highly acceptable start.

On the front nine, the railway flanking the course provides a persistent threat. A sliced tee shot on the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 7th or 8th holes could end up bouncing around on the Fylde rail line.

The run for home is particularly challenging and, as Adam Scott found out to his cost in The Open Championship of 2012, there can often be little, or no, respite until the final putt drops in front of the famous redbrick clubhouse.

The course has witnessed many great golfing performances over the years – Bobby Jones’ first Open win in 1926 and Tony Jacklin’s victory in 1969 spring to mind.

But the professional with perhaps the greatest affinity for the Lancashire links was swashbuckling Spaniard Seve Ballesteros. It was here, as a 22-year-old, he battled his way from fairways, bunkers and car parks to secure his first Major title. He returned nine years later and won again, producing a closing course record 65 to beat Nick Price by two

The 4th at Royal Lytham

The great golf writer Bernard Darwin described Royal Lytham & St Annes as, “A beast of a course, but a just beast.” His words may be over 80 years old but they hold true.

That the course has hosted The Open on no fewer than 11 occasions is a testament to this excellent test of golf, which was first laid out by the club’s original professional, George Lowe.

It also played host to the Ricoh Women’s British Open won by Georgia Hall.

Last time The Open was held here in 2012, Ernie Els won his second Claret Jug.

Assessor Feedback

A true links test despite being set back from the coast. The front 9 is a masterclass of routing and variation.

Lovers of wild natural links will love Royal Lytham but unfortunately the proximity of nearby houses does detract somewhat from the visual pleasure.

There’s wonderful history to be found in the clubhouse, you really do feel you’re following in the footsteps of the greats.

GM Verdict

A tough strategic links test with a selection of highly memorable holes and a fine history. There’s an interesting juxtaposition of nature and urbanity to be seen on the fairways.