Royal St George's Golf Club Course Review

Royal St George's - a challenging yet fair, windswept links - one of the strongest layouts in England.

How To Become A Member At Royal St George's Golf Club Royal St George's Golf Club Course Review
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Royal St George's - One of the strongest layouts in the UK and Ireland, it’s a challenging yet fair windswept links offering a thorough examination of ball-striking and strategy.

Royal St George's Golf Club Course Review

Top 100 Ranking 2021/22 - 11

Previous Rankings

2019/20 – 13 2017/18 - 10 2015/16 - 7 2013/14 - 6 2011/12 - 6 2009/10 - 12

Summer Green Fees

Round - £250

Visitors: See website for details

Medal Tee: Par 70 – 6,630 Yards

royalstgeorges.com

Changes since previous ranking

Preparations and improvements with the forthcoming Open Championship in mind. Improvements to bunker definition, many have been raised to enhance visibility from the tees.

Royal St George's Golf Club Course Review

The 6th at Royal St George's
(Image credit: Getty Images)

Royal St George's Golf Club Course Review

Playing host to The Open Championship this July for a 15th time, Royal St George’s climbs two places on the ranking for 2021/22.

Royal St George’s is a challenging track. With its undulating terrain, dunes and deep bunkering, a premium is placed on accurate hitting and steady driving. Set over a beautiful tract of unspoiled seaside land, every hole is distinct.

The 5th. (Photo by David Cannon/Getty Images)

The course is consistently good, making it difficult to single out individual holes but a couple of stand-outs include, on the front nine, the testing par-4 4th where you must drive over one of Britain’s tallest bunkers and, on the back nine, the brilliant par-5 14th where out-of-bounds all down the right side, a stream bisecting the fairway and perfectly positioned bunkering demand absolute precision.

Related: Top 100 golf courses UK and Ireland

Founded in 1887, Royal St George’s was the first English course to play host to The Open Championship, which it did in 1894. The club has welcomed golf’s most prestigious tournament 14 times in all, with Darren Clarke the most recent Open champion at St George’s, in 2011.

A great feature at St George’s is the fact the holes all point in different directions, so the background is always changing, so too the wind direction. Picking an aiming point from the tee is crucial.

Royal St George's Golf Club Course Review

On approaches, anything hit towards the sides of the putting surfaces will fall away. On the greens there are subtle breaks but there’s less borrow than there first appears. The surfaces are always magnificently prepared and presented.

The par-4 10th. (Photo by David Cannon/Getty Images)

Assessor Feedback

I have always considered it one of the finest all-round venues in golf. There is often a misconception of stuffiness with this venue, but the staff could not be more accommodating in making visitors feel at ease.

The test of golf at Royal St Georges is immense. I love the green complexes, with large undulations and vast run off areas requiring strategic and precise ball striking to access the pins.

Constant changes of style and direction provide a world class challenge which tests every shot in the book.

The par-4 finishing hole. (Photo by David Cannon/Getty Images)

GM Verdict

One of the strongest layouts in the UK and Ireland, it’s a challenging yet fair windswept links offering a thorough examination of ball-striking and strategy.

Fergus Bisset
Fergus Bisset

Fergus is a golf obsessive and 1-handicapper. Growing up in the North East of Scotland, golf runs through his veins and it was concentrated by his time at St Andrews university studying history. He went on to earn a post graduate diploma from the London School of Journalism. Fergus has worked for Golf Monthly since 2004 and has written two books on the game; "Great Golf Debates" together with Jezz Ellwood of Golf Monthly and "The Ultimate Golf Book" together with Neil Tappin (also of Golf Monthly)... Fergus once shanked a ball from just over Granny Clark's Wynd on the 18th of the Old Course that struck the St Andrews Golf Club and rebounded into the Valley of Sin, from where he saved par. Who says there's no golfing god?