Over The Top Golf Swing Drill To Fix Your Slice

As Alex Elliott discusses in the video above, an over-the-top golf swing is probably a golfer’s number one pet peeve. More often than not, it causes that ugly slice shot and is one of the hardest swing faults to correct.

That’s because, intuitively, amateurs tend to exacerbate the problem by aiming further and further left in a bid to find a short-term solution. This drill has been designed to help you finally start on your road to a more permanent recovery.

Related: Best Drivers For Slicers

Over the top golf swing drill

When golfers come over the top, it’s usually because the upper body becomes too active in transition, moving with the lower body rather than in sequence. The right shoulder initiates the rotation, which sends the club outside the ball-to-target line.

From there, all you’re going to do is cut across the ball and produce that weak left-to-right flight or, occasionally, you may even hit a huge pull if you manage to get the clubface square to path at impact. Either way, you need to resolve the problem if you want to play better golf.

So, to start this drill, take an alignment stick and place it through the two beltloops either side of your belt buckle, leaving more pointing towards the target. You want to think of this as your trigger to begin the downswing, feeling like it’s moving first, then your upper body and then your arms. This will encourage a proper sequence in which your lower body leads, allowing the club to slot into a better position approaching impact.

And to help hone this new move, work in slow motion. That means, practise hitting shots like this at say, half the speed of your normal swing, before gradually working up. This will give you a greater awareness of how it feels to get your body into the desired position, which also increases your brain’s ability to integrate this into your swing.

Related: 4 Tips To Stop Slicing The Driver

Another reason this works so well, particularly at lower speeds, is because you can really feel, and often see, how the alignment stick is moving, which acts as a great feedback tool.

Once you get the feel for the right move, repeat the drill regularly to groove a better downswing motion. Repetition is the key to adding this to your technique and finally fixing your slice for good.