Sergio Garcia became the record points scorer at the Ryder Cup in 2018, and we take a look at how he achieved it

Sergio Garcia: The Ryder Cup Record Points Scorer

Sergio Garcia became the all-time record points scorer in the Ryder Cup when he beat Rickie Fowler in the Sunday Singles at Le Golf National in 2018, taking his points tally to 25.5.

Garcia surpassed Nick Faldo’s total of 25 points in five fewer matches – it took the Spaniard 41 while Faldo played 46 matches to achieve his tally.

A veteran of nine Ryder Cups, Garcia played his first tournament in 1999 to become the youngest ever Ryder Cup player too, and he has played in every event until 2018, except from the 2010 edition where he was Colin Montgomerie’s vice-captain.

He has been on the winning side on six of the nine occasions he has played in the Ryder Cup, and could become one of just five European players to appear ten times for the team, if he is selected by Padraig Harrington for Whistling Straits.

Garcia’s record stands at 22-12-7, an impressive return that has seen him score at least two points at a Ryder Cup on eight of the nine occasions he has played.

The 2017 Masters winner seems to thrive playing in the team environment too, epitomised by his record when broken in fourballs, foursomes, and singles.

His fourballs record is 8-4-3 and his foursomes scoring stands at 10-4-3 respectively, while his singles record is 4-4-1 in comparison.

Sergio Garcia Ryder Cup

Despite that, Garcia still managed to become the record Ryder Cup points scorer during his singles match with Rickie Fowler.

The Spaniard also sits in esteemed company in other aspects of his points scoring, which has been consistently high at the Ryder Cup since his first appearance in 1999.

After going unbeaten over the first two days at The K Club in 2006, Garcia became the second player after Ian Woosnam to win all four points from his foursomes and fourball matches.

Meanwhile, his performance two years earlier in 2004 at Oakland Hills saw him become just the sixth player to score four-and-a-half points out of a possible five in the Ryder Cup.