TaylorMade Stealth 2 Plus Rescue Hybrid Review

The TaylorMade Stealth 2 Plus Rescue Hybrid has undergone major design changes but do they deliver?

TaylorMade Stealth 2 Plus Rescue Hybrid
(Image credit: MHopley)
Golf Monthly Verdict

The TaylorMade Stealth 2 Plus Rescue Hybrid will appeal to better players who want a more neutral hybrid with adjustability options. Easier to launch than it looks thanks to the carbon crown, it is a viable alternative for better players who like to vary the loft of a hybrid to suit playing conditions.

Reasons to buy
  • +

    Easy to get under ball and launch

  • +

    Adjustable hosel for small upgrade cost

  • +

    More forgiving than previous Plus hybrid

Reasons to avoid
  • -

    Carbon crown looks may not appeal to all

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TaylorMade Stealth 2 Plus Rescue Hybrid Review

The TaylorMade Stealth 2 Plus Rescue hybrid has undergone a bit of a transformation compared to the previous TaylorMade Stealth Plus hybrid. The all steel head has been replaced with an ‘Infinity’ carbon crown which is there to save weight up top so that the centre of gravity can be lowered.

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TaylorMade Stealth 2 Plus Rescue Hybrid

(Image credit: MHopley)

This is good not only for forgiveness but also for launch as creating a high flight with a soft landing is what hybrids are all about. With more weighting in the rear of the sole from the screw weight, then the MOI of the head is improved too, which is important in a head of this size.

TaylorMade Stealth 2 Plus Rescue Hybrid

(Image credit: MHopley)

The shape has been tweaked with the high toe combined with a more rounded toe so that the Stealth 2 Plus looks less like an upside down head than the previous model. This makes it set really close to the ground and in testing made it very easy to get right into the back of the ball, something that will appeal to both high handicappers and seniors.

TaylorMade Stealth 2 Plus Rescue Hybrid

(Image credit: MHopley)

The revised head shape means it looks shorter at address without reducing the face size, plus a little straighter too. The carbon crown is visible with a matt design showing through which may not appeal to all.

The Forged Twist Face sits in front of an improved Inverted Cone on the inside to improve forgiveness and the feel from this is up with the best hybrid golf clubs. The Speed Pocket behind the leading edge remains and offers increased ball speed in a design that does not catch in the turf.

The main difference from the standard TaylorMade Stealth 2 Rescue apart from the head shape is the adjustable hosel. This enables you to adjust the loft and lie buy up to +/- 1.5° and can be useful in varying the trajectory if are playing courses that need a driving hybrid or an approach hybrid.

TaylorMade Stealth 2 Plus Rescue Hybrid

(Image credit: MHopley)

For a better players’ hybrid, the TaylorMade Stealth 2 Plus Rescue was easier to launch than I was expecting and, with a wide choice of lofts from 2 (17°), 3 (19.5°) and 4 (22°) there should be something for everyone. The Plus version should have greater appeal to single figure handicappers who want a more neutral playing hybrid than the standard Stealth 2 Rescue and its inherent slight draw bias.

Unlike the TaylorMade Stealth 2 Plus Fairway, the Stealth 2 Plus Rescue is only £10 more than the standard model and is almost as easy to hit. Hybrids are all about gapping so a fitting session would be recommended to get the right model for your game, but if the Stealth Plus hybrid comes to the Rescue then welcome it with open arms.

Martin Hopley

Martin Hopley is one of the foremost UK equipment reviewers with over 20 years' experience. As the former founder of Golfalot.com he was an early pioneer of online reviews and has also been a regular contributor to other titles. He is renowned for his technical knowledge and in-depth analysis, which he now brings to Golf Monthly.