Titleist Velocity 2022 Golf Ball Review

Titleist Velocity 2022 Golf Ball brings the distance in a low spin design

Titleist Velocity 2022 Golf Ball
(Image credit: MHopley)
Golf Monthly Verdict

Titleist Velocity 2022 is the longest ball in their range with a firmer feel, but there is a trade off with less spin and control around the green.

Reasons to buy
  • +

    Excellent for distance

  • +

    Nice firm feel

  • +

    Good value for money

Reasons to avoid
  • -

    Low spin design reduces control around green

The Titleist Velocity 2022 golf ball celebrates its 10th birthday with the latest version continuing its claim to be the longest ball in the Titleist range. We wanted to find our for ourselves if this was one of the best distance golf balls on the market, so we put it to the test.

Before we get into what we discovered from the performance, it is worth mentioning how the design has evolved. When defining the characteristics of a ball, engineers can vary the firmness and depth of each of the layers to get the performance they want and that is what Titleist has done with the 2022 Velocity ball.

The core of this two piece ball is the same size but is now a little firmer which helps to generate more speed on full shots as more energy from the impact is retained.

The NaZ+ ionomer cover has also had a makeover and the new formula aims to enhance feel and has a new octahedral pattern for the 350 dimples on the cover to generate a high flight with a little more consistency.

Titleist Velocity 2022 Golf Ball

(Image credit: Titleist)

You will need this higher flight because the Titleist Velocity 2022 golf ball is quite a low spinning ball and it is this combination of ball speed, low spin and high flight that makes the Velocity ball the longest in the range.

In testing on Trackman at SGGT studios with a 7-iron, the 2022 Velocity performed very similar to the previous Titleist Velocity 2020  golf ball.  However with the driver the new Velocity was flying higher and spinning about 300 rpm less at a club head speed of around 100mph. Combined with a similar launch and a touch more ball speed this saw a gain of around 5 yards in carry.

Titleist Ball Test

(Image credit: MHopley)

Sounds great you might say but there is a downside to all this, because the lower spinning nature of the ball means that there is less spin on approaches and less control on chips around the green.

The Velocity gets around this on approaches by using the high flight to land steeply and the new model does land at a slightly steeper angle than before. Around the greens it doesn’t have the same control as a Titleist Pro V1 - or the other best golf balls at the premium end of the market. Interestingly it also didn't have the same level of control as the Titleist TruFeel in the same price bracket. However the firmer nature of the Velocity gave good sound feedback on chips and putts.

What is the difference between Titleist TruFeel and Titleist Velocity?

The 2022  Velocity comes with a revised sidestamp that has the name reversed out of a black alignment aid, which is more in your face than the previous design, so what it may lack in style it makes up for in visibility.

Titleist Velocity 2022 Golf Ball

(Image credit: MHopley)

Who Should Use a Titleist Velocity golf ball?

This only becomes an issue if you are someone who relies on spin to stop the ball. If you run the ball in and don’t need to hit a lot of chips with grip on them, then the low spin and extra distance combination makes the Titleist Velocity a great option.

Initially available in white with the distinctive orange numbers, from October 2022 you can also get the Titleist Velocity 2022 ball in Matte Orange, Matte Green and Matte Blue colours with double digit numbers from 00 to 33.

Titleist Velocity 2022 Golf Ball

(Image credit: Titleist)

Martin Hopley is one of the foremost UK equipment reviewers with over 20 years' experience. As the former founder of Golfalot.com he was an early pioneer of online reviews and has also been a regular contributor to other titles. He is renowned for his technical knowledge and in-depth analysis, which he now brings to Golf Monthly.