TaylorMade TP5 Pix Golf Ball Review

We check out the TaylorMade TP5 Pix golf balls as Ed Carruthers puts their patented ClearPath Alignment technology to the test.

TaylorMade TP5 Pix Golf Ball Review
(Image credit: Future)
Golf Monthly Verdict

TaylorMade TP5 Pix is an excellent, high-performance golf ball that is great for players looking to improve their short game. It also features the same tour quality features as the TP5, meaning this ball allows for elite-level distance, excellent control, and precision accuracy.

Reasons to buy
  • +

    ClearPath Alignment helps improve putting accuracy

  • +

    Provides immediate feedback on putting strokes

  • +

    Strong ball flight

  • +

    Excellent feel

Reasons to avoid
  • -

    Not best suited to golfers with slower swing speeds

TaylorMade TP5 Pix Golf Ball Review 

Resulting from a year-long collaboration with PGA Tour professional Rickie Fowler, TaylorMade has claimed to have taken a revolutionary step in changing golf ball technology by developing the TaylorMade TP5 Pix. First introduced to the market in 2021, the Pix is a variation on TaylorMade’s flagship TP5 golf ball, which became a huge hit with both professionals and amateurs when it was first released five years ago. 

The Pix features only visual changes to that design and noticeably has 12 orange and black triangle-shaped graphics strategically printed on its urethane cover, which TaylorMade calls its ClearPath Alignment technology. We wanted to get a feel of how the ClearPath Alignment tool works, so we tested the Pix out over 18-holes and found that these new graphics can really help you save shots around the green if used correctly.   

Man holding TaylorMade TP5 Pix golf ball


(Image credit: Future)

The orange detailing on the triangles allows golfers to visualise three clear lines going through the centre of the ball, akin to the red and blue markings on the Callaway Chrome Soft Triple Track. That works as a great way to help calibrate the angle of a putt when crouching behind the ball or even when addressing the putt. The alignment tool can also be used off the tee to help visualise where to aim with your driver. But if you do find yourself in the rough, the orange shades on this ball are easy to spot in the tall grass making it much easier to find than a standard white ball.

One other point to note is that the internal composition of the Pix is the same as a standard TP5 golf ball, meaning that the Pix delivers tour-level distance from the tee box and is very workable with an iron or a wedge in hand. But those with slower swing speeds might need to look elsewhere, like to the Soft Response ball. As a firm compression golf ball, the Pix compliments players who can generate greater clubhead speeds, while many high handicappers may struggle to generate enough power to lift this ball into the air. 

Despite that, I found the ball carries well when struck sweetly and doesn't drop out of the air. That is due in part to the new Tour Flight Dimple Pattern TaylorMade has added to the TP5 in the ball's 2021 update. This new technology reduces the drag on the ball and I could definitely see the aerodynamics of the Pix in action, with my ball zipping away on its launch and coming down at a steep angle in its descent. 

Putting with TaylorMade TP5 Pix golf ball, man putting on green

(Image credit: Future)

The Pix also gives golfers great stopping power with your shorter irons and your wedges. If you're looking to save shots off your approach game, I'd definitely recommend purchasing this ball. Particularly when playing into firm greens as the Pix's ultra-soft Dual-Spin Cover means it can be easily manipulated to put more torque on the golf ball that can help it drop dead on your target zone. I was also able to look at the movement of the graphics on the ball, to see how much spin I was getting on my wedge shots, which was another cool feature of the ball that gave me immediate feedback on the quality of my chips.

Its soft cover can also be felt out of the bunker too and if you do hit a shot slightly thin, you'll notice that the Pix reacts better than other firmer golf balls on the market and won't zip off to the other side of the green as often. While the Pix is made from an ultra-soft casing, it remains a very durable edition to TaylorMade's range of golf balls, that didn't cut up or get scratched during my round. If you're looking for more information on the different TaylorMade golf balls that are on the market, take a look at our guide on the best TaylorMade golf balls which compares the specifications of each ball in more detail. 

Putting with TaylorMade TP5 Pix Golf Ball, man putting on green

(Image credit: Future)

I also found the graphics on the Pix provided an excellent visual aid that helped narrow my focus on the ball and keep my head down over the shot. That helped me produce a better connection with both my longer clubs and my putter. On that note, the ball felt good against my putter's face and also showed me how fast or crooked I hit a shot, depending on how the triangles move with the ball as it rolls. When struck correctly at a good speed, the ball is designed to produce a white line through its centre that gives immediate feedback on how well you’ve hit the putt. 

This makes the Pix quite a unique golf ball and while TaylorMade has added to its visual assistance technology in the new Tour Response Stripe, there aren’t many other premium balls on the market that can provide instantaneous feedback like this while you’re on the course. The Pix comes in at a slightly higher price than the Stripe, but that's to be expected, considering that the Pix is designed to be a tour performance golf ball and it does offer more distance off the tee.  

Overall, the Pix is a great all-around ball that can help players save shots around the greens that struggle with aim. If you’re looking to improve the consistency of your short game, then the TP5 Pix is definitely worth considering. 

Ed has been playing golf for as long as he can remember and is obsessive about the sport. Being regularly sought after by family members and friends for advice on what equipment to buy, Ed now uses his background, having written extensively on golf gear in the past, to produce equipment orientated content for Golf Monthly.  

He graduated with a Masters in Law with Medicine from the University of Liverpool in 2017 and is currently in the process of obtaining his NCTJ Sports Journalism Diploma with the Press Association. 

Ed has written for a variety of media outlets over the years and has interviewed some big names in sport, including a British and Irish Lion, ATP Tour tennis players, and a Premier League football manager. He has also worked on some huge sporting events, including the 2021 Australian Open and is also a massive Australian rules football fan. 

When he’s not watching the AFL or the golf in his spare time, you’ll likely find him heading out for a round at one of his local golf clubs in Surrey, and was, up until recently, a member at the Leatherhead Golf Club.