Callaway Hex Soft Golf Ball Review

Mike Harris tests the Callaway Hex Soft balls to see if it delivers on its promise of great distance and soft feel

Callaway Hex Soft Golf Ball Review
(Image credit: Future)
Golf Monthly Verdict

If you like a soft feeling golf ball offering good all-round performance at an affordable price, the Callaway Hex Soft is certainly worth putting into play.

Reasons to buy
  • +

    Good all-round performance

  • +

    Excellent value for money

  • +

    Soft feel

  • +

    Impressive levels of durability

Reasons to avoid
  • -

    Significantly less spin compared to urethane balls

  • -

    Soft feel won’t appeal to all

I tested the Callaway Hex Soft golf ball over a number of rounds and even though it’s not a ball I’d play long term due to my own personal preferences, I still found lots to like. First and foremost the Callaway Hex Soft delivers a lot of performance for a relatively modest price and as such it offers excellent value for money, and competes strongly in the best cheap golf balls category.

This is one of Callaway’s distance balls, but one that's billed as also offering great feel. Callaway says this is achieved through the low compression core which is said to give greater ball speed and increased distance in the long game, but in tandem with the trionomer cover feels soft on short game shots.

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Callaway HEX Soft Golf Ball Review

(Image credit: Future)
Image 1 of 4

Callaway HEX Soft Golf Ball Review

(Image credit: Future)

In my testing I found it genuinely delivered on those claims in the long game with only a slight drop in distance off the tee compared to my usual ball, the TaylorMade TP5x. This, I would say, is purely down to my launch conditions where I find I get maximum distance with my driver from lower spinning golf balls that work best to negate the high spin I generate as a result of my steep angle of attack. On iron shots I noticed no difference in distance.

When it came to short game shots this ball undoubtedly feels soft - and that will appeal to a lot of golfers . For someone like me, who likes a firmer feel on wedge shots and with the putter, it felt a bit too soft. This is of course all subjective and comes down to personal preference.

I also found that the soft feel wasn’t backed up with as much spin and control as I was perhaps expecting and certainly am used to via the urethane cover that features on the usual ball that I play.

Callaway Hex Soft Golf Ball Review

(Image credit: Kevin Murray)

Having tested the two types of ball side by side on the short game area at my club, the amount of spin generated by the TP5x ball was noticeably greater. This difference was perhaps borne out most noticeably during my first round using the Hex Soft where I hit one of the best greenside bunker shots I’d played for some time, but it didn't spin and check in the way I’d have expected it to, but rolled out quite a long way past the flag.

Maybe I’m being overly critical and not applying a fair comparison by putting it up against a premium urethane ball. Quite frankly if you’re not used to playing a premium ball or if you don’t strike the ball consistently with your wedges to generate a lot of spin, then you won’t miss what you don’t know!

One thing that Callaway doesn't focus on in its marketing, but I'd say was another positive, is its durability. I managed to go two and a bit rounds with the same ball before losing it and despite a few brushes with trees, a cart path and plenty of short game shots using wedges with fairly fresh grooves, the ball held up well with only minor scuffing to the surface.

In summary, if you want a ball that offers distance and a genuinely soft feel at a value price then the Callaway Hex Soft should be on your short list.

Mike has been a journalist all his working life, starting out as a football writer with Goal magazine in the 1990s before moving into men’s and women’s lifestyle magazines including Men's Health, In 2003 he joined Golf Monthly and in 2006 he became only the eighth editor in Golf Monthly’s 100-plus year history. His two main passions in golf are courses, having played over 400 courses worldwide, and shoes; he owns over 40 pairs.

Mike’s handicap index hovers at around 10 and he is a member of four clubs: Hartley Wintney, Royal Liverpool, Royal North Devon and the Royal & Ancient Golf Club of St Andrews.