High Post Golf Club Course Review

High Post Golf Club is one of Wiltshire's finest, blessed with both free-draining downland turf and glorious far-reaching views

High Post Golf Club - 8th hole
Greenside mounding is a prominent High Post feature as here on the 8th
(Image credit: High Post Golf Club)

High Post Golf Club Course Review

GF Round: two-ball £90; three-ball £120; four-ball £140
Par 70, 6,305 yards
Slope 128
GM Verdict – An elegant downland course not far from Stonehenge with an attractive opening trio and a strong run for home.
Favourite Hole – The par-4-9th may not be long but it serves up a lovely uphill approach round to the right after a blindish drive.

High Post Golf Club - 9th hole

The approach to the mid-length par-4 9th hole

(Image credit: High Post Golf Club)

Opened in 1922 and extended to 18 holes in 1931, High Post Golf Club is situated about halfway between Salisbury and Stonehenge. Its fine downland layout is one of the best golf courses in Wiltshire, offering up expansive views and generally easy-walking over free-draining turf. The opening trio sets the mood nicely, starting with a relatively friendly, mid-length downhill par 4. The par-5 2nd’s bunkering looks very attractive from the tee, while the 3rd is blessed with some interesting mounding short-right of the green.

High Post Golf Club - 1st hole

The green on the inviting downhill 1st

(Image credit: Jeremy Ellwood)

In fact, the banks, slopes and hollows that surround many of the greens rank among High Post’s key features and perhaps its main defence. Sometimes they feed the ball in, sometimes they don’t! The gently undulating fairways are well-bunkered and many holes are lined with often quite dense hawthorn and blackthorn to provide a good test of your accuracy 

High Post Golf Club -10th hole

Approaching the 10th and more of those distinctive greenside mounds

(Image credit: High Post Golf Club)

The 5th is a very pretty uphill par 3 towards a copse of pines and two of the other par 3s at 11 and 17 also play uphill and will require considerably more club than the scorecard suggests into any sort of wind. The target on 17, in particular, can look very distant when the wind is in your face! It forms the middle part of a particularly strong closing trio, with the par-4 16th a test of length for many at 439 yards off the tips, and the 18th fairway then sloping awkwardly away to the right – a tough ask for many club golfers, especially if the wind is off the left.

High Post Golf Club - 12th hole

The 12th is one the best par 4s coming home

(Image credit: High Post Golf Club)

Right next to 18 lies the excellent 12th hole, another fine back-nine par 4 with a stand of pines long-left of the green and, beyond that, a glorious vista across to the distant hills. Overall, High Post is a fair test, and a course on which you may well need to make your score early on, for there are no par 5s coming home and even the shorter par 4s, such as the great-looking down-and-up 15th, play trickier than their yardage might have you wanting to believe.

Jeremy Ellwood
Jeremy Ellwood

Jeremy Ellwood has worked in the golf industry since 1993 and for Golf Monthly since 2002 when he started out as equipment editor. He is now a freelance journalist writing mainly for Golf Monthly across the whole spectrum from courses and Rules to equipment and even instruction despite his own somewhat iffy swing (he knows how to do it, but just can't do it himself). He also edits The Golf Club Secretary Newsletter, has authored or co-authored three books and written for a number of national papers including The Telegraph and The Independent. He is a senior panelist for Golf Monthly's Top 100 UK & Ireland Course Rankings and has played all of the Top 100 plus 89 of the Next 100. He has played well over 900 courses worldwide in 35 countries, but put him on a links course anywhere and he will be blissfully content. On his first trip to Abu Dhabi a decade ago he foolishly asked Paul Casey what sort of a record he had around the course there. "Well, I've won it twice if that's what you mean!" came the reply...