Prince’s Golf Club Shore & Himalayas Course Review

Considerable investment in recent years plus new holes and a dramatic re-styling have seen this famous Kent coast links break our Top 100 for the first time

Princes' Golf Club Shore Himalayas
The 4th and new par-3 5th on the Shore nine (Photo: Getty Images)
(Image credit: Getty Images)

Considerable investment in recent years plus new holes and a dramatic re-styling see this famous Kent coast links crack our Top 100 for the first time

Prince’s Golf Club Shore & Himalayas Course Review

Top 100 Ranking 2021/22 - 76

Previous Rankings New entry this time

Summer Green Fees

Roung: £100 Mon-Thu, £120 Fri-Sun

Visitors: no specified restrictions

Medal Tee: Par 72 - 6,795 Yards

W: princesgolfclub.co.uk

Changes since previous ranking (on the contender list last time)

There have been wholesale changes to all three nines here, with the Himalayas and Shore nines both boasting brand new short par 3s playing towards the sea.

The 2nd and 3rd on the Himalayas nine have been merged into a new par 5. The character of the links has changed considerably too with the introduction of several large sand scrapes and the remodelling of other holes.

Prince’s Golf Club Shore & Himalayas Course Review

It can be easy to forget that Prince’s, too, is an Open Championship venue along with Royal St George’s and Royal Cinque Ports on the Kent coast.

Princes' Golf Club Shore Himalayas

The shelf green on the Shore nine's 7th hole (Photo: Jason Livy)

Gene Sarazen won the Claret Jug here in 1932, introducing his new-fangled sand wedge to the golfing world to deal with the deep pot bunkers.

Today’s Prince’s bears little resemblance to the 18-hole course over which Sarazen triumphed 89 years ago.

Indeed, today’s 27 holes have changed beyond all recognition over the last three years thanks to major investment and the design mind of Martin Ebert. It started with a ‘re-imagining’ of the Himalayas nine.

Princes' Golf Club Shore Himalayas

Renovations started with a new look on the 're-imagined' Himalayas nine (Photo: Jason Livy)

New holes, new look

It is these dramatic changes that have led to promotion for this long-time Next 100 course. Perhaps only Ebert’s work at Turnberry and Royal Portrush has been on a similar scale in recent times.

Indeed, there are similarities between Turnberry’s transformation and that of Prince’s. All three nines are now adorned with extensive sandy scrapes that give them a completely new look.

Princes' Golf Club Shore Himalayas

The former 2nd and 3rd holes were merged into a new par 5 on the Himalayas (Photo: Jason Livy)

The 2nd and 3rd on the Himalayas nine have merged into a testing par 5, paving the way to the beautiful new par-3 5th – ‘Bloody Point’ - a hole which plays directly towards the sea, something which Prince’s previously lacked.

Princes' Golf Club Shore Himalayas

The short new par-3 5th on the Himalayas plays straight towards the sea (Photo: Jason Livy)

More recently, a new par-3 5th has also been introduced on the Shore nine, again playing towards the sea, with the old 8th hole now retired.

It is the extent of the transformation and the introduction of two fine sea-facing par 3s that have seen Prince’s finally break into our premier league.

Assessor Feedback

Prince’s has always been a very good course but perhaps lacked the real credentials to push into the next level. The recent improvements throughout, and wholesale makeover to Himalayas nine, have really brought the club into a new era.

The sandy waste areas are a good feature and the improved greens and approaches plus more bunkering have upgraded Prince’s. Your chipping and putting will be put to the sword here!

GM Verdict

Considerable investment in recent years plus new holes and a dramatic re-styling of the course have seen this famous Kent coast links break our Top 100 for the first time.

Jeremy Ellwood
Contributing Editor

Jeremy Ellwood has worked in the golf industry since 1993 and for Golf Monthly since 2002 when he started out as equipment editor. He is now a freelance journalist writing mainly for Golf Monthly across the whole spectrum from courses and Rules to equipment and instruction. He also edits The Golf Club Secretary Newsletter, a highly regarded trade publication for golf club secretaries and managers, and has authored or co-authored three books and written for a number of national papers including The Telegraph and The Independent. He is a senior panelist for Golf Monthly's Top 100 UK & Ireland Course Rankings and has played all of the Top 100 plus 91 of the Next 100, making him well-qualified when it comes to assessing and comparing our premier golf courses. He has now played well over 950 golf courses worldwide in 35 countries, right across the spectrum from the humblest of nine-holers in the Scottish Highlands to the very grandest of international golf resorts, but put him on a links course anywhere and he will be blissfully content.

Jezz can be contacted via Twitter - @JezzEllwoodGolf


Jeremy is currently playing...

Driver: Ping G425 LST 10.5˚ (draw setting), Mitsubishi Tensei AV Orange 55 S shaft

3 wood: Ping G425 Max 15˚ (set to flat +1), Mitsubishi Tensei AV Orange 65 S shaft

Hybrid: Ping G425 17˚, Mitsubishi Tensei CK Pro Orange 80 S shaft

Irons 3-PW: Ping i525, True Temper Dynamic Gold 105 R300 shafts

Wedges: Ping Glide 4.0 50˚ and 54˚, 12˚ bounce, True Temper Dynamic Gold 105 R300 shafts

Putter: Ping Fetch 2021 model, 33in shaft (set flat 2)

Ball: Varies but mostly now TaylorMade Tour Response