Callaway Rogue ST Max Iron Review

Our full verdict on Callaway's latest distance iron, tested on the launch monitor and the golf course

Callaway Rogue ST Max iron review
(Image credit: Howard Boylan)
Golf Monthly Verdict

Long, forgiving and highly playable, these irons take away the intimidation factor on approach shots. The flight is low, which is unsurprising given the strong lofts, but it is consistent and the feel from the centre is extremely enjoyable.

Reasons to buy
  • +

    Powerful feel

  • +

    Noticeably long and forgiving

  • +

    Easy to align

Reasons to avoid
  • -

    Sole scratches easily

  • -

    Some may want a higher flight

Callaway Rogue ST Max Iron Review

One of two new game improvement irons in the new Rogue ST line, the Max model directly replaces the Mavrik Max iron and continues to have the strongest lofts (the 7 iron is 27.5°) in the range. Callaway kept us waiting for this one (it arrived two months later than the impressive Rogue ST Pro iron) but we finally got the chance to test it both on the Full Swing Kit launch monitor followed by a session on the course.

Callaway Rogue ST Max iron address

(Image credit: Howard Boylan)

Looks-wise not much has changed versus what we saw with the Mavrik Max iron. The cavity is slightly less enclosed and the offset appears to have reduced slightly, although there is still plenty there to correct a miss to the right. It’s right on the edge between being inviting and chunky - this will come down to the individual - either way, there’s a lot of metal behind the ball, especially in the topline. The double white score lines behind the leading edge certainly help with alignment while the reflective mirror chrome finish surrounds a duller hitting area.

Strike this distance iron out of the middle and the feel is incredibly satisfying - solid and explosive, almost like a metalwood. This doesn’t drop off too much either when you make a poor swing, backed up by the launch monitor data that showed only very small reductions in distance off centre. Struck solid, carries averaged 173 yards in the 7-iron topping out at 176 yards. Long, but you’d expect that given the lofts. The spin at around 5,700 rpm not low enough to cause concern although the apex of 87 feet is much lower than we were used to seeing with our 90 mph club speed. While it’s true there is up to 62g of tungsten inside each of these heads, slower swingers that this model is aimed at may struggle to flight shots as they would want to really maximise distance.

Callaway Rogue ST Max iron testing

(Image credit: Howard Boylan)

It's also worth pointing out the scratches quickly accumulate on the shiny sole of these irons. It doesn't effect performance but golfers that like their irons looking pristine for as long as possible may be somewhat disappointed. This aside, it is comfortably one of the best Callaway irons in recent times within the distance iron sector.

Make no mistake, these irons seemed to make the sometimes daunting task of hitting approach shots easier, especially in the long and mid irons where the mid-to-high handicap player often misses big. It isn’t quite as refined as the TaylorMade Stealth iron but it was as consistent and provides a high level of corrective performance for the inconsistent player. At £849 for a set, there’s plenty to like about what’s on offer here given how playable this set is from the wedges right the way down to the 4-iron.

Joel has worked in the golf industry for over 12 years covering both instruction and more recently equipment. He now oversees all product content here at Golf Monthly, managing a team of talented and passionate writers and presenters in delivering the most thorough and accurate reviews, buying advice, comparisons and deals to help the reader find exactly what they are looking for. So whether it's the latest driver, irons, putter or laser rangefinder, Joel has his finger on the pulse keeping up to date with the latest releases in golf. He is also responsible for all content on irons and golf tech, including distance measuring devices and launch monitors.


During these enjoyable years he has had some money-can't-buy experiences, like interviewing Tiger Woods and Rory McIlroy one-on-one and covering the 2010 Ryder Cup at Celtic Manor. 


One of his career highlights came when covering the 2012 Masters he got to play the sacred Augusta National course on the Monday after the tournament concluded, shooting a respectable 87 with just one par and four birdies. To date, his best ever round of golf is a 5-under 67 back in 2011. He currently plays his golf at Burghley Park Golf Club in Stamford, Lincs, with a handicap index of 4.7.


Joel's current What's In The Bag? 

Driver: TaylorMade SIM2, 9° 

Fairway wood: Titleist TSi3, 15° 

Hybrid: Titleist TSi2, 18° 

Irons: TaylorMade P770, 4-PW 

Wedges: Titleist Vokey SM8, 50°, 54° and 58° 

Putter: Evnroll ER2V 

Ball: 2021 Titleist Pro V1x