TaylorMade Stealth Rescue Review

In this TaylorMade Stealth Rescue review, we take it out on the course to assess the looks, performance and versatility on offer

TaylorMade Stealth Rescue Review
(Image credit: Matthew Moore)
Golf Monthly Verdict

A highly impressive all-round hybrid. Premium looks are impressive, playability and performance are on a par with previous TaylorMade hybrid clubs. Lack of adjustability may put better players off.

Reasons to buy
  • +

    Great looking golf club, high shelf appeal

  • +

    Stable, powerful flight and good stopping power

Reasons to avoid
  • -

    Less forgiving on off-centre strikes

  • -

    Lack of adjustability

TaylorMade Stealth Rescue Review

TaylorMade Stealth is one of the most talked about product lines for years. In particular, the new TaylorMade Stealth Driver, with its distinctive red carbon face; drawing down on titanium and beginning TaylorMade’s Carbonwood era.

Tune down the driver noise for a moment. Coming in under the radar, with less noise and more stealth, is a new family of fairway woods and hybrids with their own place in the Carbonwood story. The new Stealth Plus Rescue and Stealth Rescue replace the TaylorMade Sim2 Rescue and the Sim2 Max Rescue.

TaylorMade Stealth Rescue

L to R: TaylorMade SIM2 Max hybrid from 2021 and the new Stealth Rescue

(Image credit: Matthew Moore)

In this review of the TaylorMade Stealth Rescue, we check out TaylorMade’s latest hybrid release and what’s new in this carbon-inspired long iron replacement.

All the tried and tested TaylorMade hybrid technology is here again, from the V Steel sole to Twist Face and the Speed Pocket. What’s different is a new carbon crown construction. The lighter head lets engineers shift seven grams of weight lower in the head for a better CG (centre of gravity), easy launch and optimal forgiveness.

At address, Stealth Rescue has wow factor. The red black colour story runs from the Lamkin Crossline grip through a Fujikura Ventus shaft to its sleek compact head. It’ll impress your golf buddies on the weekend and the headcover will look smart in any bag.

TaylorMade Stealth Rescue

(Image credit: Matthew Moore)

As with all the best hybrids, golfers want something easier to hit than a 2 or 3 iron and which handles bad lies and rough. I tested this club around The Hunting Course at Slaley Hall, a former European Tour venue in Northumberland and on a TrackMan at Brancepeth Castle Golf Club.

The sleek top line and carbon head do inspire confidence at address which for most golfers leads to a freer swing. I found the Stealth Rescue easy to hit with a firmer feel off the high strength C300 steel face, great acoustics at impact and a stable penetrating trajectory.

It dampened down my tendency to miss left and overdraw shots. Shots came in from a good height with plenty of control into greens. Stealth Rescue performed well on chip putts and chipping from mown aprons. Indoors on TrackMan, results were good compared to other leading brand hybrids but Stealth Rescue came in around five yards shorter than the longest hybrid on test with a total average distance of 220 yards.

With models available in lofts from 19ׄ° to 31ׄ°, the premium is more on accuracy than distance with the 19ׄ° test club, compared to its sibling Stealth Plus, which is available in 17° to 22° and adjustable by 1.5 degrees for better players that like to change set-up.

TaylorMade Stealth Rescue

(Image credit: Matthew Moore)

Average ball speed was ok at 138.6 mph. Some of the higher ball speeds were compromised by some shots coming in 135.6 mph, suggesting that if you don’t absolutely middle it; this hybrid isn’t as forgiving as you’d like. Our test data bore that out, with higher ball speeds and better impacts producing 230 yard shots compared to 210 to 216 yards on poorer contacts at lower speeds.

That said, the Fujikura Ventus stock shaft is not one I’d likely be fit into, which could explain why the Stealth Rescue didn’t give me the distance control and consistency I’d expect. Good news is that there are several custom shaft options available at no additional cost.

The Stealth Rescue retails at RRP £229 and comes in a choice of five lofts: 3/19°, 4/22°, 5/25°, 6/28° and 7/31°. There is also a women’s Stealth Rescue available with the Aldila Ascent shaft and Lamkin Sonar grip (38g). Loft offerings include 4/23°, 5/26°, 6/28° and 7/31°.

Matthew Moore fell in love with golf hitting an old 3-iron around his school playing field imagining rugby posts were flags and long jump pits as bunkers.

He earned golf scholarships to the University of St Andrews and Emory University, Atlanta, U.S.A and dreamed of playing professionally before training as a journalist.

He has worked at Golf Monthly and CNN Sports as well as covering golf news, features, products and travel as a freelance writer and TV presenter for newspapers, magazines and corporate clients. Matthew has interviewed Ryder Cup Captains, Major Champions and legends of the game and rates sharing a glass of rioja and a bowl of nuts with Miguel Angel Jimenez as his favourite moment. Matthew plays off 1, has won five club championships and aced the first hole of Augusta National’s Par-3 course in 2002.