Tour Edge Exotics E722 Driver Review

This Tour Edge Exotics E722 driver review reveals whether the performance claims deliver for regular golfers

Tour Edge Exotics E722 Driver Review
(Image credit: Scott Kramer)
Golf Monthly Verdict

Even our low-handicap golfers testing this driver thought it may have even out-performed its sister C722 geared for better players. The look is similar, although slightly larger. Put it on record: Both models are Tour Edge’s best drivers to date!

Reasons to buy
  • +

    The sleek look invites you to take a super-aggressive cut at the ball

  • +

    Impressively forgiving

  • +

    Impact sounds mighty

Reasons to avoid
  • -

    Misses high on the clubface tend to rocket skyward and go short

Best known for selling “value” clubs, Tour Edge’s Exotics premium line aims to compete with the major brands. For this club, the company got feedback from its Champions Tour pros – including Bernhard Langer – while creating the design. The 460cc E722 (Extreme) offers high MOI via a 30-gram back weight, higher launch and maximum forgiveness, with more spin and slightly more offset.

We wanted to find out whether this was one of the most forgiving drivers of 2022, so we tested it up against the Tour Edge Exotics C722 driver, to find out for ourselves.

Tour Edge 722 Crown Views

The Tour Edge Exotics 722 series crown view

(Image credit: Scott Kramer)

The design is intricately cool. A thin “Ridgeback” spine acts as a brace – running from the clubface center through the crown and connecting with a new sole plate rail – producing more power across the entire face right to the extreme perimeter. That means a stronger, crisper impact. 

Like many of the best golf drivers, the clubhead’s also made with carbon fiber from crown to sole (optimizing the CG location), and sports variable clubface thickness that extends further out to the heel and toe. This should help your ball speed when you fail to strike it from the middle of the face. In fact, there are 61 diamond shapes comprised of seven different thicknesses in an interweaving pattern on the clubface. They function as mini-trampolines, for hotter strikes all across that get you more distance.

The Tour Edge Exotics E722 driver also has a 30-gram weight at the extreme trailing edge of the sole for an extreme low-rearward CG that increases stability at impact and tightens dispersion. Additional weights are available in 20, 25 and 35 grams – individually or in a weight kit. The company also placed sound-enhancing ribs inside the clubhead, to improve impact acoustics.

E722 driver close up

(Image credit: Scott Kramer)

As the photograph above shows, you can adjust loft up and down by two degrees, from the base lofts of 9.5, 10.5 and 12 degrees. And the shaft is scientifically paired for every flex. 

In our testing, the look at address was outstanding – replete with a clearing across the crown that points squarely to the ball. The shape feel generous too and instils confidence - similar to what you get from the shaping of the Callaway Rogue ST Max driver or the PING G425 SFT driver.

Impact rings loud off the deep clubface, giving you the feeling that you nutted it – even on off-center hits. And right/left forgiveness was also reliably good. Trajectory was pleasantly high and carry was long – perhaps better than most clubs in the best drivers for high handicappers category.

With a recommended retail price of $399, we think that with the level of playability on offer, this represents excellent value for money.

Scott Kramer is a freelance writer based in Southern California. He carries a 5.2 index, along with a hacker's short game. Yet the former Senior Editor of GOLF Magazine always tries to bring his "A" game to his writing. 

Here's what's in Scott's golf bag: Driver: Callaway Epic Speed driver Fairway wood: Titleist TSi2 4-wood Hybrid: Titleist H1 hybrid Irons: Titleist AP1 irons Wedges: Vokey wedges Putter: An old Odyssey Versa putter that's been refurbished twice!