New Prince's Himalayas Nine Opens

Prince’s Golf Club in Kent, host of the 1932 Open Championship, has unveiled its newly-redeveloped Himalayas nine.

Prince's Himalayas Nine

Prince’s Golf Club in Kent, host of the 1932 Open Championship, has unveiled its newly-redeveloped Himalayas nine.

New Prince's Himalayas Nine Opens

Prince's, in Kent, has unveiled its new-look Himalayas nine featuring a stunning new par-3 and par-5.

Designed by renowned international golf course architects Mackenzie & Ebert, work began last August to transform the Himalayas into one of the finest stretches of links golf in the country.

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The new nine opened this week and features two new holes, a short, signature par-3 fifth hole which plays out towards the sea, as well as a long par-5 second hole which combines the second and third holes of the old layout and can be stretched to 615 yards.

Rob McGuirk, General Manager of Prince’s Golf Club, commented: “We’re committed to continuous improvement at Prince’s and this is certainly the most ambitious phase of development the club has seen for decades.

The new par-3 5th hole

“We are thrilled with the new look Himalayas nine and thank Mackenzie & Ebert for their hard work, skill and expertise in turning the vision into a reality.”

Martin Ebert and Mike Howard, of Mackenzie and Ebert Limited, visited the links on multiple occasions to assess the land and scope for the project prior to undertaking the work.

Related: Princes Golf Club Course Review

The company subsequently produced a report which analysed historic, pre-war and wartime RAF photography and unveiled a variety of interesting features which helped to frame the narrative of the new nine and restore some of the traditional elements of the course.

To recognise the historical significance of the site, a replica spitfire propeller has been installed by the third tee, paying tribute to the heroics of fighter pilot, PB ‘Laddie’ Lucas.

The new par-5 4th hole

A previous Walker Cup captain and son of one of the founders of Prince’s, Laddie made a forced landing on the site in July 1943 after his aircraft was badly damaged by enemy fire as he returned to RAF Manston from a mission over northern France.

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Another nod to the site’s historical importance sees the new fifth hole named Bloody Point in reference to the great naval battle that took place in Sandwich in AD 851 on the land where the golf course now sits.

This short par-3, with the backdrop of the English Channel, is one of several notable changes that have increased the par of the nine to 36, while extensive changes to the bunkering, water hazards, green surrounds, out-of-play areas, tees and clearance of trees are all included in the complete works.

Elliott Heath
Elliott Heath

Elliott Heath is our Senior Staff Writer and has been with Golf Monthly since early 2016. He graduated in Sports Journalism in 2016 and currently manages the Golf Monthly news, courses and travel sections as well as our large Facebook, Twitter and Instagram pages. Elliott has interviewed some huge names in the golf world including Sergio Garcia, Thomas Bjorn, Bernd Wiesberger and Scotty Cameron as well as a number of professionals on the DP World and PGA Tours. He has also covered three Open Championships on-site including at Carnoustie in 2018 when he was inside the ropes with Tiger Woods. He has played 31 of our Top 100 golf courses, with his favourites being both Sunningdales, Woodhall Spa, Old Head and Alwoodley. He currently plays at West Byfleet Golf Club in Surrey, where his handicap index floats between 3-5. His golfing highlight is making albatross on the 9th hole on the Hotchkin Course at Woodhall Spa, and he has made one hole-in-one.


Elliott is currently playing:


Driver: Honma TR20

3 wood: TaylorMade SIM2 Max

Hybrid: TaylorMade SIM Max

Irons: Mizuno MP5

Wedges: Titleist Vokey Design

Putter: Odyssey White Hot OG #5

Ball: Titleist Pro V1x