County Sligo Golf Club Championship Course Review

A great example of Harry Colt’s expertise, this must be one of the most scenic courses in Ireland.

County Sligo Golf Club Championship Course Review

This is a spectacular links with superb views. It’s a great example of Harry Colt’s expertise and must be one of the most scenic courses in Ireland.

County Sligo Golf Club Championship Course Review

Top 100 Ranking 2021/22 - 90

Previous Rankings

2019/20 - 89 2017/18 - 87 2015/16 - 93 2013/14 - 2011/12 - 2009/10 -

Summer Green Fees

Round - €200wd, €215 Saturday, rates available on Sunday

Visitors: Welcome 7 days

Medal Tee: Par 71 – 6,582 Yards

countysligogolfclub.ie (opens in new tab)

Changes since previous ranking

New 15th green complex and a realignment of the bunkering around the 3rd green.

County Sligo Golf Club Championship Course Review

Founded in 1894, County Sligo Golf Club at Rosses Point is one of the oldest links in Ireland. Harry Colt was principally responsible for the design of the championship course and Martin Hawtree has advised the club on more recent improvements to the layout.

Related: Top 100 Courses UK and Ireland

County Sligo

11th at County Sligo
(Image credit: Getty Images)

There’s a distinct feeling of being encircled by the sea at County Sligo, though the flat-topped mountain of Benbulben forms an intriguing backdrop to many holes.

You climb away from the clubhouse before suddenly being presented with a magnificent panorama of virtually the entire course, which is one of the best golf courses in Ireland.

It all seems deceptively open and forgiving from this aerial perspective.

There’s a distinct feeling of being encircled by the sea here, though the flat-topped mountain of Benbulben forms an intriguing backdrop to many holes.

It’s a great example of Harry Colt’s design with some tremendous holes.

The short 4th is a perfect example of a par 3 that simply doesn’t need bunkers, played as it is to a green that slopes away from you and has a run-off area short and right.

From the elevated tee at the next, you see some of the treats in store, but the most magical area is still hidden from view, over the dunes at the far end of the course.

13th hole County Sligo

Throughout the round, the views of the Ox Mountains and the golfing test are outstanding. When you reach the distant loop of holes around the turn, you feel as though you are in a different world.

The short 13th by the beach is another lovely short hole, and the penultimate hole might just be the best on the course – a very demanding dogleg left up to a green tucked away in the dunes.

County Sligo’s most famous golfer was Ceil Ewing. He was six times a Walker Cup player and winner of the West of Ireland on 10 occasions. He was captain at County Sligo in 1950 and again in 1961.

Assessor Feedback

This is an extremely natural links with some stunning views to take in. Benulben Mountain is reminiscent of Cape Town’s Table Mountain, then you have the sweeping bay and glorious beaches. It’s not surprising this landscape was an inspiration for W.B Yeats.

A round here is a real experience and the quality of the layout matches the stunning surroundings.

GM Verdict

This is a spectacular links with superb views. It’s a great example of Harry Colt’s expertise and must be one of the most scenic courses in Ireland.

Fergus Bisset
Contributing Editor

Fergus is a golf obsessive and 1-handicapper. Growing up in the North East of Scotland, golf runs through his veins and his passion for the sport was bolstered during his time at St Andrews university studying history. He went on to earn a post graduate diploma from the London School of Journalism. Fergus has worked for Golf Monthly since 2004 and has written two books on the game; "Great Golf Debates" together with Jezz Ellwood of Golf Monthly and "The Ultimate Golf Book" together with Neil Tappin (also of Golf Monthly)... Fergus once shanked a ball from just over Granny Clark's Wynd on the 18th of the Old Course that struck the St Andrews Golf Club and rebounded into the Valley of Sin, from where he saved par. Who says there's no golfing god?