Best Iron Headcovers 2024

If you've previously scoffed at iron headcovers then maybe it's time to think again?

Best Iron Headcovers
(Image credit: Golf Monthly)

Best Iron Headcovers

People tend to scoff a bit at iron headcovers but, when you’ve splashed out a large chunk of your hard-earned cash, then you want to look after them and, for anyone carrying or using a trolley, there is a lot of clanking around with your irons.

Aaron Rai uses them on tour and his reasons are particularly valid and, if it’s good enough for a DP World Tour winner, then it’s good enough for you.

“I grew up in very much a working-class family, and golf has always been a very expensive game,” Rai said. “I started from the age of four and my dad used to pay for the equipment, pay for my memberships, my entry fees. And it wasn’t money that we really had, to be honest, but he’d always buy me the best clubs.

“When I was about seven or eight my dad bought me a set of Titleist 690 MBs, and they were like £800-1000, just for a set of clubs for a kid. I cherished them. When we used to go out and practise, he used to clean every single groove afterward with a pin and with baby oil. To protect the clubs, he thought it would be good to put iron covers on it. I’ve pretty much had iron covers on all of my sets ever since just to appreciate the value of what I have, and it all started with that first set.” 

Let's get to the list...

Best Iron Headcovers

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How we test golf gear

At Golf Monthly we test golf gear with the same ethos in mind - testing products properly and extensively to see if they are actually worth buying, and then passing on our findings onto you, the reader. That way, we can produce extensive reviews that help you make an informed decision regarding possibly buying a certain model.

The Golf Monthly team are all regular golfers and with decades of experience, we look to understand new technology and design features on products. The best way of doing this is by simply using them regularly, especially when it comes to golf accessories. 

The team tests the models out on course for a number of rounds, learning what it is like to truly live with the product over a number of weeks and number of rounds to truly understand the product. 

How to choose iron headovers

What factors should you consider when thinking about buying iron covers? Let's take a look.

Number of covers

First things first you need to make sure you pick a brand or design that offers enough covers to protect all your irons in the bag. There is not much point in having 7 covers when you carry 9 irons is there? As such read the product specifications properly to see how many covers come with the set. 

Strength

The whole point of iron covers is to protect your irons underneath so they need to be well made, and strong enough to deal with the movement in the golf bag. Additionally, they need to be strong enough to deal with every day use properly, especially in terms of getting taken off and put on irons regularly. Specifically, we would be aware of the fabrics or materials used here. We have seen the models that are from leather to be very good in terms of strength, whereas cheaper models tend to be made from thinner polyester, 

Ease of use

Ultimately an iron cover needs to be easy to get on and off the iron because if not, this is adding unnecessary seconds and annoyance to your round, which is not needed especially when face with a tricky iron shot. 

Design

Brands seem to make different iron cover designs out there so you don't need to go for the simple black leather finish. Instead you can get flags, symbols, or just about anything on your iron cover so it is just a case of picking one you like the look of.

Budget

Our final factor is budget. Given how expensive iron sets can be, it does make sense to invest properly in something that will protect them but given you have already spent hard earned money on clubs, bags, balls, apparel and so on, have a think about how much you are willing to spend on iron covers. Importantly, there are models at different price points. 

FAQs

Do people put covers on their irons?

Yes there are some people who put covers on their irons as well as their woods and putter. One notable player to do so is professional Aaron Rai who does it to protect his clubs.

What do iron covers do?

Iron covers are there to protect the golf clubs from clanging into one another, and therefore damaging the metal heads. This is especially the true for clubs made from soft metals like blades or forged irons. 

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Mark Townsend
Contributing editor

Mark has worked in golf for over 20 years having started off his journalistic life at the Press Association and BBC Sport before moving to Sky Sports where he became their golf editor on skysports.com. He then worked at National Club Golfer and Lady Golfer where he was the deputy editor and he has interviewed many of the leading names in the game, both male and female, ghosted columns for the likes of Robert Rock, Charley Hull and Dame Laura Davies, as well as playing the vast majority of our Top 100 GB&I courses. He loves links golf with a particular love of Royal Dornoch and Kingsbarns. He is now a freelance, also working for the PGA and Robert Rock. Loves tour golf, both men and women and he remains the long-standing owner of an horrific short game. He plays at Moortown with a handicap of 6.


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