Mazel Golf Chipper Review

In this Mazel Golf Chipper review, Neil Tappin takes it out on the course to assess the performance benefits

Mazel Golf Chipper Review
Golf Monthly Verdict

After an hour of short game testing, we could really see the benefits of the Mazel Golf Chipper. If you struggle with your short game or face a lot of scrappy lies around the greens at your course, this club (along with a putting technique) could be the answer. You will have to figure out whether the benefits of added consistency are worth removing a traditional wedge for, but for certain golfers, this could make a big difference.

Reasons to buy
  • +

    A different approach for anyone who struggles with chipping

  • +

    Plenty of forgiveness

  • +

    Surprising levels of spin

Reasons to avoid
  • -

    Not as versatile as regular wedges

  • -

    Less effective for pitch and bunker shots

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For some golfers the long game comes more naturally than the short game. If you fall into this category and delicate chip shots threaten to ruin your score, a new approach around the greens could make all the difference. 

The Mazel Golf Chipper is designed to offer a different solution for the game around the greens. The shallow profile head has a wide sole, making it one of the most forgiving wedges available, while the beveled leading edge should help the club get through the turf without digging. 

Perhaps the most important element of the design however is in the length and lie angle of the shaft - it is slightly shorter than the best wedges and it sits more upright. This promotes more of a putting action and by simplifying the technique, the aim is to help improve the quality of your greenside ball striking.  

We wanted to test the effectiveness of the Mazel Golf Chipper for ourselves so we bought one for $81.50 and took it out onto the course at West Hill Golf Club. We hit a series of chip, bunker and pitch shots with the 45˚ version (equivalent of a pitching wedge). 

Mazel Golf Chipper Review

That this wedge has been designed with forgiveness in mind is clear as soon as you put it down behind the ball. There is a very generous hitting area and it has a shallow, almost putter-like profile. It might not be the most aesthetically pleasing club to look at in the bag but if it is confidence you are looking to build, this will fit the bill. This also makes it one of the best golf wedges for beginners.

The area we struggled with most during our testing was on pitch and bunker shots. We felt as if the lie angle was causing the shots to go left and when making a bigger swing, we weren’t in as much control with the Mazel Golf Chipper as with regular wedges.

However, there were some areas around the green where the benefits became very clear. When the grass beneath the ball was particularly tight or if the ball was on a slightly muddy lie, the Mazel Chipper (along with a putting technique) came into its own. 

We hit a series of shots from very difficult lies and the results were better than we would expect from our own wedges. The simplicity of the technique combined with a club that is designed to be used that way and didn’t get caught in the turf, delivered clean contacts and consistently impressive results.

Mazel Golf Chipper Review

(Image credit: Golf Monthly)

What’s more, because we were using a traditional putting technique, this way of playing required very little getting used to. Within a few minutes we were hitting good shots from lies that would usually instil fear. 

Related: Kirkland 3-Piece Wedge Set

The key decision for many will be whether they would be prepared to drop a traditional wedge in favour of a chipper. This might restrict the versatility of your shot selection around the greens but for those in more need of consistency, we can see this being a compromise well worth making.

Neil Tappin
Digital Editor

In his current role, Neil is responsible for testing drivers and golf balls. Having been a part of the Golf Monthly team for over 15 years and playing off a handicap of 3, he has the experience to compare performance between models, brands and generations. For 2022 he thinks the main trend in drivers is: "In a word, consistency. Whilst all the brands are talking about ball speed (and the new drivers are certainly long), my biggest finding has been how much more consistent the ball flights are. Mishits don't seem to be causing the same level of drop-off or increase in the spin numbers. This means that more shots seem to be flying the way you want them to!" As far as golf balls are concerned the biggest development is in the, "three piece, non-Tour, urethane-covered section. For regular golfers, these models offer superb performance at both ends of the bag without denting your wallet quite as much as the premium Tour-played options."


Originally working with the best coaches in the UK to produce instruction content, he is now the brand's Digital Editor and covers everything from Tour player interviews to gear reviews. In his time at Golf Monthly, he has covered equipment launches that date back well over a decade. He clearly remembers the launch of the Callaway and Nike square drivers as well as the white TaylorMade driver families, such as the RocketBallz! If you take a look at the Golf Monthly YouTube channel, you'll see his equipment videos dating back over a decade! He has also conducted 'What's In The Bag' interviews with many of the game's best players like Rory McIlroy, Dustin Johnson and Jon Rahm. Over the years, Neil has tested a vast array of products in each category and at drastically different price-points. 

Neil is currently playing: Driver: TaylorMade Stealth Plus Fairway Wood: Titleist TSR2 Hybrid: Titleist TS3 Irons (4-9): Mizuno JPX 919 Forged Wedges: Titleist Vokey SM7 46˚, 50˚, 54˚, 60˚ Putter: Odyssey Triple Track Ten Ball: Titleist Pro V1X