TecTecTec ULT-G GPS Watch Review

In this TecTecTec ULT-G GPS watch review, we take a look at one of the best value options in the category

TecTecTec ULT-G GPS Watch Review
(Image credit: Golf Monthly)
Golf Monthly Verdict

TecTecTec’s ULT-G GPS watch isn’t going to blow you away with the number of features that it provides, but the features on offer perform extremely well. More specifically, the ULT-G is user friendly and highly accurate, while also providing exceptional value in its category.

Reasons to buy
  • +

    Easy to set up

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    User friendly on course

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    High level of accuracy

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    Premium look and construction

Reasons to avoid
  • -

    No touch screen functionality

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    Limited number of features

TecTecTec ULT-G GPS Watch Review

My first experience with a TecTecTec golf product came earlier this year when I tested the KLYR laser rangefinder, which I came away highly impressed with. More recently, I’ve had the chance to test the company’s ULT-G GPS watch.

I typically prefer a rangefinder over a GPS device, in part because I’m not the most technologically savvy golfer and GPS watches and/or handhelds can be confusing and frustrating in terms of their setup and features. The ULT-G was neither, however, and would be the kind of GPS watch that I’d actually use. It’s basic and simple, and I mean that as a compliment.

In terms of my initial impressions, the ULT-G watch looked sharp and felt far more solid than its lightweight design might suggest. The band was also quite nice, making the watch comfortable to wear, and once I had the device set up, its display was easy to read.

TecTecTec ULT-G GPS Watch

(Image credit: Golf Monthly)

And speaking of setup, the ULT-G was a breeze in that regard. The manual provided was outstanding in terms of directions, and I had no trouble getting the watch ready for play or pairing it with my phone and the TecTecTec GPS app, which offers course and device updates, as well as technical support. It’s also worth noting that you don’t have to use the app to use the ULT-G on the golf course, and the device offers 38,000 preloaded courses with no subscription or update fees.

As soon as I got out of the car when I arrived at my home course for testing, a list of courses was quickly populated upon hitting the Satellite button. And when I clicked on Atlanta National at the top of the list, I was instantly given a front, back, and center yardage for the first hole. As I played, there were no issues with each new hole populating automatically and I could also manually change holes with ease.

In addition to front, back, and center yardages (meters are also available, as well as five language options), the ULT-G provided distances to hazards and to carry them, and it has a distance tracking feature as well, which proved to be disappointing only in terms of how far I was actually hitting my driver! But in all seriousness, when testing the various yardages that I was getting from the ULT-G against the same numbers I was also shooting with a rangefinder, the watch proved to be highly accurate from a data standpoint.

TecTecTec ULT-G GPS Watch

(Image credit: Golf Monthly)

In terms of features, however, that just about covers what the ULT-G has to offer, which for me was perfect but for some golfers might not be enough. It also doesn’t have touchscreen functionality, but it should be noted that the various buttons on the watch are easy to understand and use. But if you’re looking for course mapping and stat tracking, among other features, you won’t find it here.

What you will find, however, is a quality, user-friendly GPS watch that covers the basics in impressive fashion. At at a retail price of $99.99, the ULT-G is one of the best value golf watches on the market and between this device and the KLYR rangefinder, I have no problem recommending TecTecTec to anyone looking to address their distance measuring needs.

Chris Wallace
Chris Wallace

Chris joined Golf Monthly in February of 2022, becoming the organization’s first full-time staff writer in the United States. In his role at Golf Monthly, Chris reviews a broad spectrum of golf equipment, ranging from the latest in golf clubs to what’s new in the world of golf technology. His vast experience in the game allows him to look beyond the marketing hype to judge the merits of the latest equipment for golfers of all ability levels. As for the trend in golf equipment that Chris has been most impressed with in recent years, the Players Distance Iron category would earn that distinction, as golfers now have far better options for irons that provide the assistance that so many need in terms of distance and forgiveness without forcing them to sacrifice look and feel.


On a personal level, Chris played college golf and was a three-year letterwinner and two-year captain at Lynchburg College in Virginia and later spent two years as the assistant golf coach at the University of Virginia. The vast majority of his professional career, however, has been spent as a sports writer and editor. In the early phases of his career, he covered college football, college basketball, and golf for different newspapers and websites before turning his attention solely to golf in 2011. Over the course of the past decade, Chris managed the Instruction Blog for GolfChannel.com and more recently created equipment-related content for TGW.com and 2ndSwing.com.


An avid player, Chris currently maintains a handicap index of 2.4 and has a career-low round of 66, which he has shot on three occasions. He lives about 20 miles north of Atlanta in Roswell, Georgia, with his wife, Stacey, and is a member at Atlanta National Golf Club.


Chris is currently playing:

Driver: Callaway Epic Sub Zero, 10.5*

Fairway wood: TaylorMade M3, 17*

Hybrid: Callaway Apex UW, 19*

Irons: Mizuno JPX 921 Forged, 4-PW

Gap wedge: Cleveland RTX 4, 50*

Sand wedge: Titleist Vokey SM6, 56M

Lob wedge: Titleist Vokey SM8, 60L

Putter: SeeMore Nashville Z3C

Ball: TaylorMade TP5x