PXG Sugar Daddy II Wedge Review

In this PXG Sugar Daddy II wedge review, we find out what performance golfers can expect

PXG Sugar Daddy II Wedge Review
(Image credit: Future)
Golf Monthly Verdict

There’s no doubt the Sugar Daddy II is an improvement on its predecessor. The extra grind option as well as the unique levels of adjustability make it a highly versatile wedge and one that would stack up against any on the market.

Reasons to buy
  • +

    Extremely well balanced

  • +

    Easy to flight and spin

  • +

    Very forgiving

  • +

    Unique levels of adjustability

Reasons to avoid
  • -

    High-toe design won't be for everyone

  • -

    Feel is a little firm

Building on the success of the original model, PXG has launched the second iteration of its Sugar Daddy wedge, and we were keen to find out what improvements have been made. With that in mind, we put it through its paces to see how it stacks up against the best golf wedges on the market. 

First and foremost, the visuals are striking. New for this release is an eye-catching and unique adjustable weight that’s housed at the back of the wedge, meaning golfers who decide to go for a fitting - which we would highly recommend - can get it properly fine-tuned for their needs. It’s an attribute that makes the Sugar Daddy II wedge one of the most well-balanced wedges I’ve tested. 

PXG Sugar Daddy II Wedge Review

The weight at the back can be adjusted in two-gram increments to achieve optimal performance

(Image credit: Future)

Over the ball, much has also changed. Based on tour feedback, PXG has opted for full-face grooves - which take a while to get used to - while also gone is the classic teardrop shaping, replaced by a high-toe design. This combination actually makes each wedge look more lofted when standing over the ball, which was admittedly a little disconcerting at the outset.

PXG Sugar Daddy II Wedge Review

The Sugar Daddy II wedge (right) features full-face grooves and a higher-toe design than its predecessor (left)

(Image credit: Future)

However, away from the visual aspect, these changes married together to make it one of the most forgiving wedges on the market. On mis-hits I was still able to generate great levels of spin from the 100 per cent CNC milled grooves, and the precision weighting technology at the back of the club and in the high-toe design meant the flight and distance was really consistent on full shots. 

PXG Sugar Daddy II Wedge Review

Andy Wright testing PXG's new wedge release at Kings Acre Golf Club

(Image credit: Future)

One thing I did notice when pitching from around 50 yards was that the feel was a little on the firm side. It didn’t take long to get used to but it’s something to bear in mind for those who prefer a softer-feeling wedge. When hitting fuller shots, this effect was largely negated.

As well as the ability to adjust the weight and therefore move the centre of gravity (CG) around, an extra sole option is available which wasn’t before. Golfers can now choose between the 10° C-Grind and the 13° BP-Grind based on their swing and turf conditions.

PXG Sugar Daddy II Wedge Review

Over the ball, this wedge looks more lofted than it actually is

(Image credit: Future)

As someone who has a tendency to get a little steep, this was invaluable, especially when pitching and chipping. It would also allow me and others to tailor their wedge set-up based on certain scenarios they’re likely to find themselves in. For example, while a higher-bounce wedge is great when turf is soft or when a bunker is overfilled, on firm ground or in bunkers with very little sand, the 10° option would likely be best.

The PXG Sugar Daddy II wedge is available in two finishes - chrome and xtreme dark - both of which look excellent from all angles, and comes in lofts of 50° through to 62° in 2° increments. The chrome finish will cost £389 in the UK and $499 in the US, while the xtreme dark model will be a little more - £469 and $599 respectively.

It's already available to buy in the US and goes on sale in the UK on February 4.

A lifelong golf fan, Andy graduated in 2019 with a degree in Sports Journalism and got his first role in the industry as the Instruction Editor for National Club Golfer. From there, he went on to enjoy a spell freelancing for Stats Perform producing football reports, and then for RacingNews365 covering Formula 1. However, he couldn't turn down the opportunity to get back into the sport he grew up watching and playing and now covers a mixture of equipment, instruction and news for Golf Monthly's website and print title.


Andy took up the game at the age of seven and even harboured ambitions of a career in the professional ranks for a spell. That didn’t pan out, but he still enjoys his weekend golf at Royal Troon and holds a scratch handicap. As a side note, he's made five holes-in-one and could quite possibly be Retief Goosen’s biggest fan.


As well as the above, some of Andy's work has featured on websites such as goal.com, dailyrecord.co.uk, and theopen.com.


What's in Andy's bag?

Driver: Callaway Mavrik Sub-Zero (9°)

3-wood: TaylorMade M1 (15°)

Driving iron: Titleist U500 (17°)

Irons: Callaway Apex Pro '19 (4-PW)

Wedges: Titleist Vokey SM9 (50°, 54° and 58°)

Putter: Titleist Scotty Cameron Newport 2.5

Ball: Titleist Pro V1