The three-time grand slam champion has said he'd be interested in becoming a caddie when his tennis career is over

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Andy Murray Eyeing Up Post-Tennis Caddying Career

Andy Murray has hinted that he’d be interested in becoming a caddie when he decides to hang up his racket for good.

The three-time grand slam champion is a huge sports fan and told the Gentleman’s Journal that caddying on tour is among the options he’d be open to considering when his tennis career comes to an end.

“I love sport,” Murray began by saying, “so something else that would interest me post-playing would be working in another sport.

“I got asked about this a little while ago and, because I really like golf, being a caddie on a golf tour would be exciting – to be up close and personal with top golfers and to learn about another sport like that.”

Citing the similarity between golf and tennis from a mental standpoint, the Scotsman would certainly be well equipped to lend a helping hand, having achieved what he has, despite his injury struggles, in arguably the toughest era in the sport’s history.

As well as three grand slams – two Wimbledon titles and a US Open – Murray won back-to-back gold medals at the 2012 and 2016 Olympics.

Andy Murray defeated Roger Federer in straight sets to win gold at the 2012 London Olympics

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“There’s probably some crossover between tennis and golf on the mental side of things and helping a golfer with that might be interesting,” Murray continued.

“Or getting my coaching badges in football – that would be fun.”

Growing up, Murray was also an avid footballer, and at the age of 15, was offered a chance to train with Rangers but ultimately turned it down to focus on tennis.

And not to be pigeonholed, the 33-year-old took the opportunity to mix up his training in lockdown and developed yet another sporting hobby.

He said: “For the first two months of lockdown all of my training was done at home. I was doing a lot of cardio work and, for the first time in my life, I did some road biking.

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“To begin with, I got a bike just to be able to go out and exercise. But I got quite into it. I actually think, when I finish playing tennis, cycling is something I want to do more of.

“I live 20 minutes south of Wimbledon in Surrey. So I cycled around Box Hill, where they did some of the Olympic road racing.

“I had two or three routes I was doing consistently and because I’m competitive, I was seeing if I could beat my times each week to see if I was getting fitter.

“I enjoyed going up the hills – so tough, but I really loved it.”

Murray was due to play in the Miami Open which got underway last week but suffered another injury setback when he woke up feeling soreness in his left groin that would ultimately lead to his withdrawal.

It’ll be a sad day when he is eventually forced out of the sport he’s enjoyed so much success in, but tennis’ loss could be golf’s gain should he find his way onto the bag of a tour pro.

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